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Old 09-11-2013, 08:38 PM
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Tally ZJ Tally ZJ is offline
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Default Bush Hog repair today

If you guys get tired of me posting my repair jobs just let me know. I can quit it

Anyway, bush hog needed new lift point mounts. Cancer got them. Wasn't much left of the old mounts so I didn't even bother with the camera.

The new mounts were supplied by the owner. He had them cut at a local machine shop.

Started about 3pm this afternoon and finished just as it got dark.

This is the job I traded for the two welding tanks that I will pick up tomorrow I guess. Too tired tonight to think about it.
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Old 09-11-2013, 09:07 PM
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A bit of help needed here. As I ran the bead, where the upright mount contacts the mower deck, I was getting tremendous undercut. Nothing I did seemed to help. I was running 1/8" Lincoln E7018 DCEN at about 125amps.

I changed the heat, rod angle, travel speed. Still got undercut.
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Old 09-11-2013, 09:25 PM
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Camaro Zach Camaro Zach is offline
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I enjoy seeing everyone's day to day projects.


On 1/4" material like that I usually use 3/32" 7018 DCEP 75-80 amps. Smaller rod, less amps, less undercut on thinner metal.

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Old 09-11-2013, 10:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tally ZJ View Post
A bit of help needed here. As I ran the bead, where the upright mount contacts the mower deck, I was getting tremendous undercut. Nothing I did seemed to help. I was running 1/8" Lincoln E7018 DCEN at about 125amps.

I changed the heat, rod angle, travel speed. Still got undercut.
Did you try moving you ground?
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Old 09-11-2013, 10:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Camaro Zach View Post
I enjoy seeing everyone's day to day projects.


On 1/4" material like that I usually use 3/32" 7018 DCEP 75-80 amps. Smaller rod, less amps, less undercut on thinner metal.

Sent from my iPhone using SFT
That was 3/8" thick material.

Quote:
Originally Posted by digr View Post
Did you try moving you ground?
I had it as close to the work as I thought was necessary. What would moving the ground have done for me? That is a trick I don't yet know about
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Old 09-11-2013, 11:53 PM
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Default The joys of bush hog repairs

I too enjoy seeing the day to day repairs.
It helps me keep motivated on the old junk I work on....although it's for my own use not my daily business.

Got to love bush hogs....they take such a beating and are neglected so badly it's surprising how well the really stand up.

It's looking pretty good though.

Cheers.
Glenn.
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Old 09-12-2013, 12:00 AM
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Originally Posted by stampeder View Post
I too enjoy seeing the day to day repairs.
It helps me keep motivated on the old junk I work on....although it's for my own use not my daily business.

Got to love bush hogs....they take such a beating and are neglected so badly it's surprising how well the really stand up.

It's looking pretty good though.

Cheers.
Glenn.
Thanks! Yeah, the repair went well except for the undercut issue I was having and one boogered up vertical weld I flubbed up.

I am terrible at vertical up so I try a few on each job that I can even if the weld is not necessary. I need to learn that position but I have not enough practice material to waste.

Good strong repair though and will last another couple decades if he keeps the rust at bay.
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Old 09-12-2013, 07:07 AM
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Under cut is usually to much heat or not holding your rod in the puddle long enough so the medal can roll up the side but at 125 amps it should not be a problem. When welding sometimes you get a problem with arc blow when the arc is very unstable and by moving the ground the problem might go away but not always. As far as your verticals try running a down hand pass with 6010 first to get a core bead in there first then go up with 7018. your heat should be the same or a little lower. As I was told years ago "let the puddle push the rod". On a good machine you can feel the rod ride on the metal as it cools. With a weave going up hill you go fast (not to fast) across the center of the weld and pause at each side. I usually count 1-2 at the sides to get a uniform bead. It just takes practice.
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Old 09-12-2013, 07:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digr View Post
Under cut is usually to much heat or not holding your rod in the puddle long enough so the medal can roll up the side but at 125 amps it should not be a problem. When welding sometimes you get a problem with arc blow when the arc is very unstable and by moving the ground the problem might go away but not always. As far as your verticals try running a down hand pass with 6010 first to get a core bead in there first then go up with 7018. your heat should be the same or a little lower. As I was told years ago "let the puddle push the rod". On a good machine you can feel the rod ride on the metal as it cools. With a weave going up hill you go fast (not to fast) across the center of the weld and pause at each side. I usually count 1-2 at the sides to get a uniform bead. It just takes practice.
+1
Tally, letting the rod fill the edges is the hardest part of welding to learn, Digr's pause is the way to cure most undercut issues.
I use what I call a "Z" pattern weave, once you have your puddle established, you travel quickly straight across the center of the bead, pause and let the puddle fill in. Than travel across at an angle, moving forward about the diameter of the rod, pause to fill the puddle, then you move straight across again. repeating the quick travel across the center.
There are many patterns you can use for a pretty weave pattern, but the main part is the pause on the edges. If you get the edge to fill than the center of the bead will take care of itself.
I would not have used 1/8" rod on that job, I would have run 3/32" instead. There is a big difference in the amount of metal deposited by 1/8" rod when compared to 3/32" rod. Managing that extra molten metal can lead to faster then necessary forward travel and a crappy looking weld bead.
When welding uphill, the rod angle has a lot to do with how the bead will turn out. The rod should be 90° to the weld in uphill position.
Nice work.
Dan.
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Old 09-12-2013, 09:58 AM
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Tally ZJ Tally ZJ is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digr View Post
Under cut is usually to much heat or not holding your rod in the puddle long enough so the medal can roll up the side but at 125 amps it should not be a problem. When welding sometimes you get a problem with arc blow when the arc is very unstable and by moving the ground the problem might go away but not always. As far as your verticals try running a down hand pass with 6010 first to get a core bead in there first then go up with 7018. your heat should be the same or a little lower. As I was told years ago "let the puddle push the rod". On a good machine you can feel the rod ride on the metal as it cools. With a weave going up hill you go fast (not to fast) across the center of the weld and pause at each side. I usually count 1-2 at the sides to get a uniform bead. It just takes practice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lu47Dan View Post
+1
Tally, letting the rod fill the edges is the hardest part of welding to learn, Digr's pause is the way to cure most undercut issues.
I use what I call a "Z" pattern weave, once you have your puddle established, you travel quickly straight across the center of the bead, pause and let the puddle fill in. Than travel across at an angle, moving forward about the diameter of the rod, pause to fill the puddle, then you move straight across again. repeating the quick travel across the center.
There are many patterns you can use for a pretty weave pattern, but the main part is the pause on the edges. If you get the edge to fill than the center of the bead will take care of itself.
I would not have used 1/8" rod on that job, I would have run 3/32" instead. There is a big difference in the amount of metal deposited by 1/8" rod when compared to 3/32" rod. Managing that extra molten metal can lead to faster then necessary forward travel and a crappy looking weld bead.
When welding uphill, the rod angle has a lot to do with how the bead will turn out. The rod should be 90° to the weld in uphill position.
Nice work.
Dan.
Quote:
Originally Posted by smawgmaw View Post
I would have done the same as above and also run my setup DCEP. Put more heat on the tip of the rod and not the material Im welding. Should calm down some of the undercut.
Will try this next time. I have learned to use the "Z" weave with 7018 and have successfully ran 7018 uphill using that method. Just not on this job. This was a horizontal weld and I just couldn't get it to act right.

"Arc blow" best describes what I saw happening. It would just blow out the top edge of the metal and the rod puddled more at the bottom and almost left a gap in the middle.
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