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Old 04-29-2020, 01:27 PM
Chrissmomo98 Chrissmomo98 is offline
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Default Lincoln Weldanpower 225

I have a Lincoln Weldanpower 225 with a broken rod in the Briggs engine. I am trying to take the engine off to rebuild but I am having trouble getting the shaft to come out. Any suggestions on how this motor is attached. Is there a keeper of some sort? Do I need to heat where the shaft goes in to the welder. It has been outside in the weather for a long time and shaft is pretty rusty. Any help or ideas would be greatly appreciated!
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Old 04-29-2020, 07:54 PM
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We had a member, Old Man, who removed a crapped motor from a Ranger and replaced it with a Honda twin. Do a search for his thread on this and that will tell you what he did to remove it. The shaft is tapered and the generator shaft is a female taper.
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Old 04-30-2020, 10:46 AM
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Welcome to the site.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chrissmomo98 View Post
I have a Lincoln Weldanpower 225 with a broken rod in the Briggs engine. I am trying to take the engine off to rebuild but I am having trouble getting the shaft to come out. Any suggestions on how this motor is attached. Is there a keeper of some sort? Do I need to heat where the shaft goes in to the welder. It has been outside in the weather for a long time and shaft is pretty rusty. Any help or ideas would be greatly appreciated!
In General there is about 3 different tapers on engines sold, as I recall.
likely there is a 12" or so long through bolt that holds the rotor to the engine that you need to remove first.

there is also a type of puller some type of bolt to break the taper lock once you have removed the ~12" bolt.
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Old 05-01-2020, 11:01 PM
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terry lingle terry lingle is offline
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Once you remove the bolt holding the rotor onto the engine shaft you should see a thread it the end of the rotor. a long threaded rod is used to jack the rotor off the tapered crankshaft.
I have found that later inexpensive units are not meant to be repaired and may not be threaded for removal.

I have such a unit in for service. I tapped the rotor shaft and made a push bolt.
it has been under about 100 ft lbs torque for a couple of weeks and gets a hit with a dead blow hammer every time I check it.
At this point it is probably beyond salvage as I suspect that the rotor is either threaded on ( a tapered shaft with an external thread mated to a rotor with a matching taper and internal thread or was lock tited at the factory. Neither assembly method allows for easy field disassembly.
The truth is that I can supply a new replacement generator for less than the cost of a repair to the windings.
There are diodes mounted on the rotor and I suspect that they are the problem but they cannot be reached unless the rotor is removed.
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Old 05-02-2020, 12:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chrissmomo98 View Post
I have a Lincoln Weldanpower 225 with a broken rod in the Briggs engine. I am trying to take the engine off to rebuild but I am having trouble getting the shaft to come out. Any suggestions on how this motor is attached. Is there a keeper of some sort? Do I need to heat where the shaft goes in to the welder. It has been outside in the weather for a long time and shaft is pretty rusty. Any help or ideas would be greatly appreciated!
I suggest finding the engine code number, model number and serial number for the Briggs first.

Then visit the Briggs website and start the process of finding information that could help you. : https://www.briggsandstratton.com/na.../manuals.html#
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Old 05-04-2020, 02:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terry lingle View Post
Once you remove the bolt holding the rotor onto the engine shaft you should see a thread it the end of the rotor. a long threaded rod is used to jack the rotor off the tapered crankshaft.
I have found that later inexpensive units are not meant to be repaired and may not be threaded for removal.

I have such a unit in for service. I tapped the rotor shaft and made a push bolt.
it has been under about 100 ft lbs torque for a couple of weeks and gets a hit with a dead blow hammer every time I check it.
At this point it is probably beyond salvage as I suspect that the rotor is either threaded on ( a tapered shaft with an external thread mated to a rotor with a matching taper and internal thread or was lock tited at the factory. Neither assembly method allows for easy field disassembly.
The truth is that I can supply a new replacement generator for less than the cost of a repair to the windings.
There are diodes mounted on the rotor and I suspect that they are the problem but they cannot be reached unless the rotor is removed.
Terry, how about taking a bolt that fits the rotor thread, and drilling thru it's entire length in the lathe, tap the head 1/4-28 for a grease zerk
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Old 05-04-2020, 03:42 PM
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I have been thinking the same thing but due to a serious family issue have not been out to work on it. it is rather the last dich effort as it should generate about 10,000 psi
I may get to it later today.
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Old 05-05-2020, 08:31 AM
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If it is locktited , permanent or whatever, at 300 degrees it turns to goo. A heat gun will work to soften that if they used it.
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  #9  
Old 05-05-2020, 11:27 AM
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A heat gun is not practical as the shaft is inside the wound rotor you woud damage the winding before you got hot enough to destroy the bond.
It is all over I went out last night and it had come loose. the problem was ... rust in the joint.
I checked the rotor windings and they are open so the machine is junk as the cost of repair exceeds replacement cost.
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Old 05-06-2020, 07:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terry lingle View Post
A heat gun is not practical as the shaft is inside the wound rotor you woud damage the winding before you got hot enough to destroy the bond.
It is all over I went out last night and it had come loose. the problem was ... rust in the joint.
I checked the rotor windings and they are open so the machine is junk as the cost of repair exceeds replacement cost.
That sucks, but at least you made a few buck on disassembly, if you are charging for it.
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