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  #11  
Old 02-07-2019, 03:19 PM
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I wish I had put a layer of plastic under my mobile home when moved it to current spot. I dread going under it to work in anything because of the soft dirt. Raises dust real quick. But I was too frugal to pour a pad or anything else.


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  #12  
Old 02-07-2019, 05:28 PM
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If this is a modular, set it on a foundation then no worries about water lines or leveling. I got off track with the mobile home term. I put a plastic sheet in our house in WA. Did make later trips under the house much nicer. Use some blocks or bricks to hold down the plastic sheet before you set the modular down.
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  #13  
Old 02-07-2019, 06:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
Didn't think it would be that much. If you have good insulation in the skirting do you need to insulate the pad? I realize you're also looking at the reality that you're only going to be there for so long so there's a trade off between how much you put into it and how much use you get out of it. We're sort of facing the same thing now that we have the place sold. We've got to put some work into the trailer to make it more livable and presentable but we can't get too carried away, either--we'll have to find a balance somewhere.







Around here they refer to them as modular homes...


I thought modular homes were ones that came on two or more trailers and they put them together on site. If he is getting a 20’x 76’ that might be a piece unit, hence “self contained home”. I bought a 16’x80’ 22 years ago, and I think it is 15’7” at the roof eaves, by 76’ long with the tongue. They liked to round up.

I got some excess ICF foam wall panels from a friend that I put up for the skirting, then put up the vinyl skirting over that. I usually don’t have to much problems with freezing under my trailer, but I do have a couple spots where I had to die repairs over the years so the floor insulation is not 100% intact anymore.

I heat with an outdoor wood water heater that I built, and have the lines run under the house, and into base board heaters in most of the rooms, so I only complain when I am cutting the firewood.

I might have an opportunity to get natural gas hooked up this summer, so planning that for the future when I am too broken up to cut firewood. It might only cost me $3000 to get hooked up now on their initial running of the main line, but if I wait 5 or 10 years, it will be 1/2 mile of current prices of installed pipe, now about $10 a foot, so figure I better take advantage of getting the gas to me now.


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  #14  
Old 02-07-2019, 06:15 PM
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I like the thought of a pad/slab underneath. As high as you can get it. And while your pouring concrete, you can pour the foundation for any patio/porch/Florida room/shed/driveway/carport, etc.

A "Florida Room" is an enclosed patio either under the main roof or attached to a main structure. Usually just screened in. I don't know what you call it there... Maybe an "Alberta Room"?
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  #15  
Old 02-07-2019, 06:28 PM
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Interesting how mobile home setup has changed over time. My current residence is simply sitting on stacked concrete block piers and dirt. The kitchen end is almost sitting on the ground. Forget working under that end. Skirting is not insulated. At some point there was heat tape on the pipes but it was long gone when I replaced the poly pipe. The floor insulation is mostly gone. Probably past it's life expectancy.
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  #16  
Old 02-07-2019, 07:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
Didn't think it would be that much. If you have good insulation in the skirting do you need to insulate the pad? I realize you're also looking at the reality that you're only going to be there for so long so there's a trade off between how much you put into it and how much use you get out of it. We're sort of facing the same thing now that we have the place sold. We've got to put some work into the trailer to make it more livable and presentable but we can't get too carried away, either--we'll have to find a balance somewhere.



Around here they refer to them as modular homes...
I'm referring to $46,000 for the shack repair, not including lifting the sinking kitchen. I suspect the digging, jacking and lifting will add 4-6 thou to the estimate the contractor gave me. This has nothing to do with the trailer, it just pushed me over the edge to tear down the shack and get newer, instead of lather more money on it.

The total bill for everything for the trailer footings is slightly less than 8 grand, and it is then ready to move into.
Once it is set up then it will be summer, and I won't be in any hurry. I plan to rent a hoe and finally dig a trench and lay Teck cable to power it, that roll of Teck has been suntanning for a few years now. And I will probably throw in some CAT5 cable as well to bring hindernet to the shop. The it will be harvest time.

I'll do the burn and bury ceremony next winter. Going to have a demolition sale on water tank, and furnace, and windows, stove, washer etc.

Talked to the nearest thing to a local authority here on trailer site prep, and he said the county wants a groundsheet and gravel laid down under the unit. When I talked to them they never said boo about it, and I did not want to disturb an elephant, so I took their to-do list and beat feet.
I'm ok with the gravel, and I got a 6" thick roll of landscape cloth someone threw away so I'm good.
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  #17  
Old 02-07-2019, 07:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mccutter View Post
I like the thought of a pad/slab underneath. As high as you can get it. And while your pouring concrete, you can pour the foundation for any patio/porch/Florida room/shed/driveway/carport, etc.

A "Florida Room" is an enclosed patio either under the main roof or attached to a main structure. Usually just screened in. I don't know what you call it there... Maybe an "Alberta Room"?
Sounds right. We eat and live in the carport all summer, It's not enclosed, just roofed over.
Quote:
Interesting how mobile home setup has changed over time. My current residence is simply sitting on stacked concrete block piers and dirt. The kitchen end is almost sitting on the ground. Forget working under that end. Skirting is not insulated. At some point there was heat tape on the pipes but it was long gone when I replaced the poly pipe. The floor insulation is mostly gone. Probably past it's life expectancy.
There's nothing wrong with that setup, it is done all the time. But less common in the future I suspect, as they are going away from steel frames and using wood frames instead.
Trailers built for southern or coastal conditions are not well insulated to start with. And when global warming happens and a pipe breaks, the belly wrap gets ripped into, and most people call a plumber, and don't care that he took a knife to it instead of removing and replacing it, and the plumber leaves the soggy insulation on the ground, and then son of a gun,....the durn thing froze up again. Call that plumber back.
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  #18  
Old 02-07-2019, 07:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by milomilo View Post
If this is a modular, set it on a foundation then no worries about water lines or leveling. I got off track with the mobile home term. I put a plastic sheet in our house in WA. Did make later trips under the house much nicer. Use some blocks or bricks to hold down the plastic sheet before you set the modular down.
Chris, in our terminology it is a single wide trailer. The make them up to 22" wide. The trailer can also be called an 80 footer, but the reality is the dwelling is 76' and the hitch makes 80'
A double wide is what we always considered a modular and now is called a RTM home. Ready to move.
When we decided to look at this option we were stunned that no one makes mobile homes and our searches were empty.
Then we learned the terminology.
Once we figured that shit out, we started looking at used, and of course everyone calls them mobiles.
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  #19  
Old 02-07-2019, 10:14 PM
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I've been studying on this all day and creating digital map of the property to scale in metric to satisfy the boffins.
I talked to my buddy Tim, who has a Hitachi 200 and a hoe-pak. He drives piles for mounting pump jacks, but right now he is on a pipeline job and he says it is going through breakup.
I wanted him to drive plain straight sched 40 pipe in to when it stops, and I know he can do a straight and proper job.
He and his machine are tied up.
So that leaves screw piles or ICF block or a pad.

Pad requires a level site and mine has 18" slope over that distance.
Concrete cost for 2500lb is $4813
Done in summer only.

ICF would work and give a level on sloping land. Has to go below 4 ft for frost, so might as well call it a basement.
Concrete $98168
No price on ICF block yet. Can be done in mild cold, 10 degrees of frost max, not this stuff.

Screw piles will work on an uneven site.
Cost quote today $6810
Complete and ready to place the house in one day. Can be done in winter.

Getting the house lifted and on the road will be easy. Getting into this site will be a trip.
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  #20  
Old 02-07-2019, 10:33 PM
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My house is 27x54 and was brought on site in two pieces. Had been described to me as a "modular" home. It's on wood cribbing only. Screw piles would not be a benefit in my area. The area under the house is framed in and insulated and stays warm enough the bare lines running from the ground to the house dont freezer in the coldest weather. The lines do however freeze below ground if the heat tapes aren't plugged in. The lines are about 3ft from the outside of the house so the frost creeps under and gets them.
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