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  #21  
Old 09-11-2019, 11:26 AM
o7oBaseMetal o7oBaseMetal is offline
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You don't need a large welding machine for this. Assuming TIG process, you should be able to do it with 65 amps or less. Use 1/16 wire. Remove sink and put some kind of shims in place to give you a 1" gap from the wood. Put a backing strip in. Copper would be ideal but stainless steel would work too it just leaves more potential grinding on the difficult side to get a grinder.
Your weld doesn't need to be pretty as you will grind it and polish it afterwards. Don't worry about not being hot enough. Fill that gap as cold as you can get away with. Once you have a rough grind you will probably need to pound the warpage out with a hammer and block before final polish.
Easy as pie except all the nonsense to prepare and reassemble...

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  #22  
Old 09-11-2019, 11:57 AM
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Another possible option. I have no experiencewith this stuff.

https://www.muggyweld.com/products/
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  #23  
Old 10-14-2019, 09:37 AM
NOBLNG NOBLNG is offline
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The reason for the seam location is that there is only a 4"-6" joint in front of and behind the sink, as opposed to a 24" joint across the flat counter top or a miter joint in the corner (I assume this is an "L" shaped or very long counter). For a cheap and easy repair, I like the re-solder idea, or clean up and silicone or epoxy idea. If they want it welded then I would get rid of all the solder and make the tightest fitting patch possible and tig it using no filler or .030 wire for filler if necessary. If they want it invisible then they need a new counter top. Good Luck.

Last edited by NOBLNG; 10-14-2019 at 09:43 AM.
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  #24  
Old 10-14-2019, 11:21 AM
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toprecycler toprecycler is offline
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The more I thought about it, and after doing a test piece at home on a piece of wood,
And due to the fact I would have to haul the heavy Lincoln Square wave 175 in and figure out a power plug, and the challenge of getting the joint opened up to get all the solder removed for tig welding, I recommended to the owner JBweld. All it need to do it to seal against water splashes, so that should do it.

Just because I could have done it, does not mean they would like the price of all the hassle to do it properly.




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  #25  
Old 10-14-2019, 01:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by o7oBaseMetal View Post
...Remove sink and put some kind of shims in place to give you a 1" gap from the wood...
If you do that you open up the gap between the two pieces, leaving yourself with more space to fill. Also, when you're finished welding and you try to push the material down flat there's a good chance that it will buckle and leave a bulge.

Quote:
...Put a backing strip in. Copper would be ideal but stainless steel would work too...
Copper would be the first choice because the SS won't adhere to it. If you use stainless for the backing it will get welded to the underside of the existing material. This wouldn't be a problem as long as you chisel out some of the wood under the stainless sheet so everything can lay flat. In fact, this would probably be your best approach since you wouldn't have to lift the material and widen the gap.

Quote:
...Your weld doesn't need to be pretty as you will grind it and polish it afterwards. Don't worry about not being hot enough. Fill that gap as cold as you can get away with. Once you have a rough grind you will probably need to pound the warpage out with a hammer and block before final polish...
Stainless sheet is a nasty beast. It will buckle and warp substantially in this situation. Getting a good clean, tight weld in there in the first place will make life whole lot easier. Pounding and flattening isn't going to work well.

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...Easy as pie...
Yeah, good luck with that...
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  #26  
Old 10-14-2019, 07:35 PM
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Quote:
Just because I could have done it, does not mean they would like the price of all the hassle to do it properly.
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  #27  
Old 10-14-2019, 07:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GWIZ View Post
Take a piece of SS the width of the sink and glue it on top wrap it down the front.
At least you will have two symmetrical lines and no gap.
Yep,put a patch over it.
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