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  #11  
Old 09-09-2019, 09:04 AM
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Run!!!!!!
Plan B, good back up plan.
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  #12  
Old 09-09-2019, 11:27 AM
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Another issue you'll have with that repair is the solder--or whatever it is--that's gooped on there. It would have to be completely removed; something which is virtually impossible. I think the only way to fix that would be to cut away a small section on either side of the existing joint and then weld a strip in behind. That would keep it from leaking but it will leave an ugly looking patch.

One way to fix that would be cut out a strip across the front of the sink so you had two joints equally spaced from the ends. That would give you clean, square joints which is what you need to weld SS that light.

At one time we did quite a bit of kitchen and sanitary SS welding. It's quite doable but it requires a special approach, the right equipment and very steady hands. To weld that you need a) a small torch, b) a small tungsten (probably .050"), c) low amperage; I'm guessing 20-30 amps, d) a perfect fit up, and e) good steady hands and good eyesight. You could weld that up and buff it out with Scotch Brite so you couldn't even see the weld. Get anything wrong, though, and you'd make a mess of it real quick...
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  #13  
Old 09-09-2019, 02:00 PM
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I would make a small stainless patch and epoxy it over the crack/seam...
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  #14  
Old 09-10-2019, 08:40 AM
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This is why the good Lord invented silver/grey 100% silicone.
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  #15  
Old 09-10-2019, 09:27 AM
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This is why the good Lord invented silver/grey 100% silicone.


This was my original suggestion, but he seems to think he wants it permanent. She is already thinking it might cost too much when I looked at it and started prepping them for the cost and difficulty of this little 2” long weld.

Guess I will see when I meet back up with them with these options.

Sad part it the prep work and the time to move tools needed to the job will far out number the actual “weld time”, but it is what it will be.


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  #16  
Old 09-10-2019, 11:56 AM
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Originally Posted by toprecycler View Post
Sad part it the prep work and the time to move tools needed to the job will far out number the actual “weld time”, but it is what it will be.
Not to mention the time you've taken considering our opinions and suggestions. Welding/fabricating falls into one of those skill areas such as doctoring or lawyering only without the candy-striper or paralegal. Prep, prep, prep for a 30-second weld--people don't quite understand that prep is a MAJOR part of the repair...
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  #17  
Old 09-10-2019, 01:13 PM
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Only two right ways of doing it! One as Zack suggested backing plate and the obvious is to pull the sink and countertop...

There really is no epoxy or sealer that I know of that will hold up on that.
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  #18  
Old 09-10-2019, 04:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder View Post
I think I would try making clearance behind the steel and put a 316 backing
piece behind the crack, and weld the top piece to the backing piece, to create
a double lap weld, likely in 3 passes with plenty of time for cooling to minimize
warping.

Then find the moron who put the seam there in the first place and bitch slap
him.
This!

Look at the back of the sink. There's a matching joint going up the wall. Silver soldered over a big gap?
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  #19  
Old 09-10-2019, 04:47 PM
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I've repaired fuckups like that shipboard in sanitary and medical spaces.

Pull the sink for access,

Use a carbide burr or slitting saw, on a dermal or hand die grinder to square and straighten the edges of the gap. lift the cover away from the wood backer and slide in a formed backing piece (18 to 22 gage SS) Flux the gap, and fill with grade 5 or 6 silver solder. I like a micro torch for this kind of work, but a tig torch with a very small tungsten and helium/argon mix will do as well. (We used TIG to build SS sanitary furniture in the first place, but found silver solder to be easier to work with on curved edges, tight corners and small return repairs)

Work short sections, cool in between passes. Pay close attention to wetting/tinning out the prepared edges. When the edges are married, build up a raised bead, slowly, control heat input to minimize the shrinking/ buckling in the HAZ. If it won't wet out before color change, stop, cool, re prep and go slower/smaller area.

Burr, metal finish smooth and polish the repair to match to match the surrounding area. The color won't match but a fingernail should not catch on any surface imperfections. I like "High force 44 solder" from Brownells, for small holes and cracks. flows well at lower (relatively) temps.

RED
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What I really need to know is, WHEN DOES THE SHOOTING START?

Last edited by RED caddy; 09-10-2019 at 04:53 PM.
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  #20  
Old 09-10-2019, 08:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RED caddy View Post
I've repaired fuckups like that shipboard in sanitary and medical spaces.

Pull the sink for access,

Use a carbide burr or slitting saw, on a dermal or hand die grinder to square and straighten the edges of the gap. lift the cover away from the wood backer and slide in a formed backing piece (18 to 22 gage SS) Flux the gap, and fill with grade 5 or 6 silver solder. I like a micro torch for this kind of work, but a tig torch with a very small tungsten and helium/argon mix will do as well. (We used TIG to build SS sanitary furniture in the first place, but found silver solder to be easier to work with on curved edges, tight corners and small return repairs)

Work short sections, cool in between passes. Pay close attention to wetting/tinning out the prepared edges. When the edges are married, build up a raised bead, slowly, control heat input to minimize the shrinking/ buckling in the HAZ. If it won't wet out before color change, stop, cool, re prep and go slower/smaller area.

Burr, metal finish smooth and polish the repair to match to match the surrounding area. The color won't match but a fingernail should not catch on any surface imperfections. I like "High force 44 solder" from Brownells, for small holes and cracks. flows well at lower (relatively) temps.

RED


Thanks Paul. Another option. And another thing for me to learn to do, Silver solder.


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