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Old 08-28-2019, 10:17 AM
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Default cleaning tooling and assorted other things

So I was just trying to organize some of my machining tools and realized I have a bunch of drills with mt2 ends on them. I was thinking I'd clean them up with a scotch brite pad and acetone but figured I'd ask here to get opinions. They have some rust which appears to be not too bad. I also have a dial indicator fixture that could use attention too. Once cleaned up I figured on a coating of oil, but does that ruin the liners in the kennedy tool boxes?
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Old 08-28-2019, 11:07 AM
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Originally Posted by gimpyrobb View Post
Once cleaned up I figured on a coating of oil, but does that ruin the liners in the kennedy tool boxes?
I would use a light coat of Fluid Film. Let everything set out for a day, wipe clean then store.
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Old 08-28-2019, 11:30 AM
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To clean tooling like morse tapers--anything where you don't want to remove material and potentially change the fit of mating surfaces--I would first start with some medium grade steel wool. See where that gets you. There's no doubt that Scotch Brite will make a better job of cleaning rusty surfaces but it is abrasive and it will remove a small amount of material each time you use it.

The whole idea of using tooling with rusty or pitted surfaces is something I won't do. The primary surfaces of a machine tool should always be as pristine as possible; they are, in fact, precision machined. The tailstock and headstock of the lathe and the quills of drill presses and milling machines will eventually lose their precision if they're constantly subjected to rough and rusty tooling...
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Old 08-28-2019, 11:58 AM
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Keith, you're saying that something made of plastic is more abrasive than steel? I was thinking scotch brite would be gentler than steel wool. I'm asking cause I don't know, not to be argumentative.
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Old 08-28-2019, 01:13 PM
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...you're saying that something made of plastic is more abrasive than steel?
I'm not exactly sure what Scotch-Brite is made of but I do know that it's not plastic and it is designed for removing material. We use the 5" brown discs all the time for finishing aluminum and you can actually use it to remove weld beads. Of course the finer grades are less aggressive but it still an abrasive. It would take a lot of work with a hand-held pad of steel wool to remove material but it generally does a nice job of cleaning up rusty surfaces.

Have I ever used Scotch-Brite myself to clean up ground surfaces? Of course--and yes, it does work well; you just need to be aware that, especially if you use it a lot, it will erode some of the metal. Whenever I need to remove rust or other build up from a fine surface I'll always start with steel wool and only move to Scotch-Brite if I can't get the results I want with the wool...
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Old 08-28-2019, 01:22 PM
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A company that manufacturers screw compressors would only allow me to soda blast rusted screws . No scotch bright,no steel wool, they would allow the tarnish that the soda would not remove ,but they claimed they were made to .0001 for fit .
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Old 08-28-2019, 01:25 PM
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I always assume that any process that removes rust ,scale or other material wil affect the precision of machined surfaces.

Good design practice makes the more expensive part harder than the consumable so that the damage that happens in use is mostly confined to the consumables.
We have discussed this before and I pointed out that the tool holder has a power limitation and as the tooling (drill bit or reamer) increases in size the rpm must drop to keep the surface speed within the correct range.
This means that the effective HP or torque on the holding method increases as the tooling gets larger but the breakout limit of the system remains the same.

my lathe has a 7.5 hp motor and a lowest speed of 20 RPM.
at that speed the chuck has an effective hp of 7.5X1800/20 = about 675 hp
there is no way that the #3 morse taper in the tail stock can handle that power.
If the bit jams on break through the safety fuse is the power handling limit of the taper and tang.
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Old 08-28-2019, 03:25 PM
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We use the 5" brown discs all the time for finishing aluminum and you can actually use it to remove weld beads. Of course the finer grades are less aggressive but it still an abrasive. It would take a lot of work with a hand-held pad of steel wool to remove material but it generally does a nice job of cleaning up rusty surfaces.
[/QUOTE]

Ahhh, I was just going to use one of the hand held pads, not one of the whizz wheel types.
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Old 08-28-2019, 03:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gimpyrobb View Post
I was thinking scotch brite would be gentler than steel wool.
Scotch-Brite comes in different "grits". White, (green), grey, maroon (and maybe more) in order of coarseness. Some grits have embedded silicon carbide in them so YES, they are abrasive. I buy 7447 (maroon) by the box of 20.
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Old 08-28-2019, 04:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gimpyrobb View Post
Keith, you're saying that something made of plastic is more abrasive than steel? I was thinking scotch brite would be gentler than steel wool. I'm asking cause I don't know, not to be argumentative.
The scotchbrite product line is ALL a series of embedded abrasive in a plastic matrix. Their trick is to colour code the aggressiveness of the abrasive with assorted colours in the plastic matrix.
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