Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Mechanical & Electrical

SFT Search:   
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-01-2007, 06:48 PM
Rbryant Rbryant is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 55
Default Is this "black pipe" or "cast iron pipe"?

I am building a simple road gate for my Dad.

He gave me some metal posts that had been used (I believe) for a car port.

They had relatively thin metal plates welded to each end (maybe 12 or 14 gauge), then bolted to the cement floor and ceiling of the carport, so they *can* be welded.

I noticed pipe threads in one end. They are thick, probably 3/16". ID is 2 and a sixteenth inches, OD is 2 and 3/8", just eyeballing with a ruler.

Grinder wheel and flap disk really didn't want to cut it very much. I did get it shiney, but some rust pits are still embedded below the surface.

Question is I want to use these as posts for the gate. I have 4" weldable hinges welded to 1 inch 1/8" thick angle. I want to weld another piece of 1 inch eighth angle (setting against the pipe) to the pipe on the two edges of the angle, then weld the hinge and angle to it.

Any special concerns? I would like to TIG with ER70-2S rod at about 120 amps and get some good penetration into the pipe. Would 7018 rod be better with the rust pits? I just want a good stick. Gate won't be heavy, will be 14 ft triangluar span out of 1x1 sq. tubing...

Also, any idea what a good paint would be to use on these posts? I scrapped off most of the two layers of old paint, underneath looks rusty, not shiney.

THANKS!

RBryant
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-01-2007, 07:28 PM
Harvuskong's Avatar
Harvuskong Harvuskong is offline
The Enforcer
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Big Country Area, TX - Abilene TX area
Posts: 3,726
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rbryant
I am building a simple road gate for my Dad.

He gave me some metal posts that had been used (I believe) for a car port.

They had relatively thin metal plates welded to each end (maybe 12 or 14 gauge), then bolted to the cement floor and ceiling of the carport, so they *can* be welded.

I noticed pipe threads in one end. They are thick, probably 3/16". ID is 2 and a sixteenth inches, OD is 2 and 3/8", just eyeballing with a ruler.

Grinder wheel and flap disk really didn't want to cut it very much. I did get it shiney, but some rust pits are still embedded below the surface.
Sounds strong enough.

Quote:
Question is I want to use these as posts for the gate. I have 4" weldable hinges welded to 1 inch 1/8" thick angle. I want to weld another piece of 1 inch eighth angle (setting against the pipe) to the pipe on the two edges of the angle, then weld the hinge and angle to it.

Any special concerns? I would like to TIG with ER70-2S rod at about 120 amps and get some good penetration into the pipe. Would 7018 rod be better with the rust pits? I just want a good stick. Gate won't be heavy, will be 14 ft triangluar span out of 1x1 sq. tubing...
As always, the deeper the posts into the ground, the better.

Digging a large hole and then pouring concrete hold the post does not cut it in my opinon. I have seen way too many done that way and later, they are blown over high wind. or knocked over by hit from a car or truck.

We drove corner, brace and gate posts 5 feet into the ground. Used 3 in and 2 7/8 in. pipe. No concrete.

Dad's cousin picked up a plow with 3/4 PU and big long gooseneck one day. Leaving out through the gate, he was a bit too close on side. Heavy D-ring sticking out clipped the gate post. Shook the rig loudly. I closed the gate and looked at the base of the post. There was a ring crack in the ground about 1/16 in. wide, all the way around the base. Post was still straight. nothing broken.

As for the welding, 6011 or 7018 stick will be fine. 6010 or 6011 would be better. Tig on this item would be overkill.


Quote:
Also, any idea what a good paint would be to use on these posts? I scrapped off most of the two layers of old paint, underneath looks rusty, not shiney.

THANKS!

RBryant
Sand blasting is one way to clean the posts. Electrolysis is another way or naval jelly to clean posts for paint prep.

I am not an expert on paint. Cutter and/or others can tell you about the paint choices.
__________________
Running away is the coward's way out of war.
Appeasement is the coward's way into one.


Barack Hussein Obama is our enemies favorite candidate


In time the right project will find the scrap pile, no need for the scrap pile to go out looking for a project.

http://www.swiftvets.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=24981

http://tosettherecordstraight.com/index.php
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-01-2007, 11:22 PM
dubby's Avatar
dubby dubby is offline
Director: Fish Seduction
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Lubbock, TX
Posts: 9,351
Default

I've been playing with some similar posts here lately. The crud on the outside is just old age, not much you can do about it except clean it up where you plan to weld. Don't waste too much time prepping it for paint, just hit it with a wire brush. Take a trip to a good paint shop. Possibly a Benjamin Moore dealer if you can find one, and go with a product called MoreGuard I believe. Its a direct-to-metal paint, no primer needed, and they can make it in either an oil or water based.
__________________
I've always had more time than money.

Wade's Custom Kydex
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-02-2007, 06:58 AM
Rbryant Rbryant is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 55
Default

Thanks guys, that helps.

Harvuskong--how did you drive the pipe in for your fence? I wouldn't mind doing that if you can come up with any easy way to do it! And do you have any rock in the ground in your area?
Otherwise I do have about 300# of concrete I've had sitting around that I'd love to get rid of...

I'm not looking forward to digging 36" holes with post hole diggers, either. I will take my 5 foot long, 1 inch diameter solid steel "root cutter and rock basher" that has a blade on one end (For busting roots, rocks, concrete), and mushroom on the other (for tamping dirt back in).

RBryant
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-03-2007, 06:12 PM
Harvuskong's Avatar
Harvuskong Harvuskong is offline
The Enforcer
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Big Country Area, TX - Abilene TX area
Posts: 3,726
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rbryant
Thanks guys, that helps.

Harvuskong--how did you drive the pipe in for your fence? I wouldn't mind doing that if you can come up with any easy way to do it! And do you have any rock in the ground in your area?
Otherwise I do have about 300# of concrete I've had sitting around that I'd love to get rid of...

I'm not looking forward to digging 36" holes with post hole diggers, either. I will take my 5 foot long, 1 inch diameter solid steel "root cutter and rock basher" that has a blade on one end (For busting roots, rocks, concrete), and mushroom on the other (for tamping dirt back in).

RBryant
Danuser MD-6 Post Driver is what I used. I think that it is no longer in production. Will attempt to find the owner's Manual later tonight.

It was a 3pt. hitch mounted, pto drive operated friction drive post driver. Weight of the driver hammer head looks to be about 200 to 250 lbs. Raise the hammer up and drop it on the post, the post will go down into the ground.

We drove 3 in., 2 7/8 in. and 2 3/8 in. pipe into the ground in Summer of 1998. Hard & dry black heavy ground and dry sandy ground as well. All of them 5 feet deep. No cement used any where at all.

All pipe posts were 3 posts wide from ground level to 3 feet deep, single pipe width the other 2 feet. Like this -- 000 - 3 foot wings were welded to center pipe.

Driving t-posts with the MD-6 was not a problem at all.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Fence posts.JPG
Views:	291
Size:	12.3 KB
ID:	22033  
__________________
Running away is the coward's way out of war.
Appeasement is the coward's way into one.


Barack Hussein Obama is our enemies favorite candidate


In time the right project will find the scrap pile, no need for the scrap pile to go out looking for a project.

http://www.swiftvets.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=24981

http://tosettherecordstraight.com/index.php
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-04-2007, 09:27 PM
Rbryant Rbryant is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 55
Default

Well that explains the D-ring ripped off the trailer.

I'll be post-hole digging 36 inches and pouring concrete around it. Will be stronger than the locust posts that are about 18 to 24 inches in the ground that the folks are putting up with now. My new ones won't be pulling D-rings off passing trailers, but they will stand up long enough.

RBryant
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-06-2007, 10:57 AM
Mikey
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I've done it alot of ways, but my favorite way is to use dry Portland cement.

If you mix it about 5% with the dirt you take it out, and tamp it down, it's less messy, less work, and sets the posts better, IMHO. You don't use any water, either. The ground moisture will make it a very strong mix. This works up to red clay. With that, you mix it 10%.....
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 04-06-2007, 11:02 AM
Mikey
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dubby
I Possibly a Benjamin Moore dealer if you can find one, and go with a product called MoreGuard I believe. Its a direct-to-metal paint, no primer needed, and they can make it in either an oil or water based.
Yup, I tried that with some *clean* square tubing. YUK! That stuff is expensive, and it didn't look worth a hoot, IMHO> I ended up sand blasting it to get it off. A real nightmare and new steel, well cleaned, too.

I use Rustoleum rusty metal primer and top coat now for all this stuff. (wood, too).
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 04-06-2007, 11:54 AM
dubby's Avatar
dubby dubby is offline
Director: Fish Seduction
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Lubbock, TX
Posts: 9,351
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikey
Yup, I tried that with some *clean* square tubing. YUK! That stuff is expensive, and it didn't look worth a hoot, IMHO> I ended up sand blasting it to get it off. A real nightmare and new steel, well cleaned, too.

I use Rustoleum rusty metal primer and top coat now for all this stuff. (wood, too).

Wow, thanks for the heads up. I've never used it on clean stuff before, what'd it do? Maybe the rust/grime/grease/old paint lets it get a better bite? *shrug*


I don't get paid to paint, if it has color usually it's someone else's idea...
__________________
I've always had more time than money.

Wade's Custom Kydex
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:36 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.