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  #31  
Old 06-03-2021, 03:32 PM
Normans54 Normans54 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GWIZ View Post
Does any one know what gas the turbo torch is using now a days?
you don't want get one that you can not get refilled.

I'm thinking they likely did away with the old acetylene turbo torch.
Based on my research, turbo torches use acetylene in MC tanks (which I know my local Airgas will swap.)
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  #32  
Old 06-03-2021, 04:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GWIZ View Post
Does any one know what gas the turbo torch is using now a days?
you don't want get one that you can not get refilled.

I'm thinking they likely did away with the old acetylene turbo torch.

Not sure what you’re talking about.

I have one, and they are still available through the welding suppliers. Mine’s setup to use a ‘B’ tank, (next size up from MC’), with the right adapters one could run them off larger tanks too if so desired.


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  #33  
Old 06-03-2021, 06:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Normans54 View Post
Thanks for the explanation, however I am still a bit confused as to how the size of the acetylene tank has an impact/what that impact is. Can you clarify?
The volume of fluid in the tank directly impacts how fast the acetylene will bubble out and produce gas for the torch. If you try to draw more gas than the bottle can produce, you start sucking up the acetone in the bottle. The space left in the tank when you draw the acetone from it is a hazard as the gas is unstable.

A properly filled tank has a very small space in the top that allows the gas to collect outside of the acetone. The thickness of the tank in that area also acts as a heat sink and helps stabilize the gas outside of the acetone.
If you pull the acetone level down, you create a larger area for unstable gas to form. Eventually you have enough unstable gas formed that it explodes.

If you want to use a really large torch you have to use a larger tank as it allows a bigger volume of acetylene to bubble out of the acetone. Eventually for serious set ups you start running multiple tanks on a manifold.

Think of it kind of like you wanted to put a balloon over the neck of a bottle of pop and collect the CO2 that fizzes out over time. A 20 ounce bottle will not produce as much gas as a 2 liter bottle.
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  #34  
Old 06-03-2021, 06:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Normans54 View Post
Based on my research, turbo torches use acetylene in MC tanks (which I know my local Airgas will swap.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by greywynd View Post
Not sure what you’re talking about.

I have one, and they are still available through the welding suppliers. Mine’s setup to use a ‘B’ tank, (next size up from MC’), with the right adapters one could run them off larger tanks too if so desired.


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yes at one time I seen the acetylene ones then I started seeing this other style see picture.
it just happens last week I was looking at this one but he did not list the gas, he just updated his listing and now states propane.
I was thinking it may have been Mapp or that other P gas I don't remember.

as a note to our new member, bottles need to be hydro tested every so many years.
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  #35  
Old 06-03-2021, 07:02 PM
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As an aside to the newer weldors, look very carefully at what tanks are available local to you. Bear with me.

Locally, I have 2 options for tanks - outright purchase or annual lease.

The owned tanks are not truly my property, but are exchange tanks. I take in the empty and, for a fee bring home a full tank. No additional charges. Pay as you go. For low consumption operations, it makes perfect sense for reasons that will become clear in one or two more paragraphs.

Leased tanks hereabouts are not refilled locally, but exchanged as above for a lower fee. There is an annual lease charge to pay as well.

So I have 3 types of " owned" exchange tanks. 20 lb propane, 40 ? Cu ft acet, and 80 cuft oxygen. A propane refill locally is 15-20$ for 20 lbs. Replacement tanks are about 45$. Recertification is about 40$. Exchange tanks are 20-25$ to exchange no recert/ replacement required.

My acetylene tank cost 280$ to "buy" and about 90$ to exchange. No recert or hydrotest - ever. Exchange on a lease acetylene tank is about 75$ and the annual lease is about 100$/yr. no recert or hydrotest. I can exchange 2-3 tanks per year for what a lease tank will cost (with the same gas consumption). Best is for my usage, There is no meter running.

Economics for my oxygen bottle are similar.
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  #36  
Old 06-03-2021, 07:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Normans54 View Post
Thanks for the explanation, however I am still a bit confused as to how the size of the acetylene tank has an impact/what that impact is. Can you clarify?
As stated before
"2) Acetylene gas is very unstable in larger cavities at pressures higher than 15 PSI. "

the Acetylene regulator has a red line above 15psi..... just about all the things I welded I adjust the regulator about 5psi.

I think my bottle is a "B" at 36 cu-ft
so no more than 1/7 for the 36 cu-ft with-draw rate.
there is a chart that gives the flow-rates for tips/hole sizes


..... IIRC the new rate may be 1/10

other bad thing (hi flow rate for bottle size) if liquid acetone starts spraying into the regulator ... acetone can melt the rubber diaphragm inside the regulator and hoses.

never open the Acetylene valve more than 1/2 turn so you can turn it off fast in an emergency..
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  #37  
Old 06-03-2021, 10:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GWIZ View Post
another bad thing (hi flow rate for bottle size) if liquid acetone starts spraying into the regulator ... acetone can melt the rubber diaphragm inside the regulator and hoses.

never open the Acetylene valve more than 1/2 turn so you can turn it off fast in an emergency..
To add to this, if an acetylene tank is stored on its side, it must be put upright for at least a couple hours--I wait at least a half a day. This allows liquid to leave the valve and settle as low as possible for reasons Matt outlined above.

As acetylene liquid could have entered the regulator and damaged it, always watch the gauges when you open the valve on the tank (cylinder). The regulator adjustment knob/t-handle should be backed out to relax the diaphragm spring after bleeding the hoses before storage and/or at the end of the day.

IF, when you open the tank valve, the low-side gauge climbs to max, immediately close the tank valve because the regulator needs repair/replacement and is unsafe to use. Used equipment may have this issue and should be inspected before purchase. If the low-side does not rise, the gauge should be ok to use and the high side will read the pressure in the tank. I think the last acetylene tank I picked up was about 220psi or so and the oxygen was around 2200psi.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Acetylene Fact Sheet.pdf (118.7 KB, 29 views)
File Type: pdf AR-oxygen-acetyleneuseandsafety.pdf (1.74 MB, 29 views)
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Last edited by mccutter; 06-05-2021 at 08:54 PM.
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  #38  
Old 06-04-2021, 01:08 PM
BukitCase BukitCase is online now
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Gwiz is correct about the newer acetylene withdrawal rate -

https://www.thefabricator.com/thewel...fety-knowledge

My plasma can (if you're patient enough) cut up to 1", so usually when I need to break out the O/A it's either a jeweler's torch or a rosebud, + I have tips for my cutting torch that can handle up to at least 4": so when I bought my O/A tanks about 40+ years ago I bought the biggest non-manifolded tanks available (mostly because of the then 1/7 thing)

There's times when I'll go thru a full tank or two, but mostly they sit for a few YEARS between uses. No biggee, I ALWAYS double check for valve leaks when I change cylinders.

Decided it was time for new hoses a year or so ago, added a hose reel then - I pretty much never need more than maybe 40' reach, so 50' hoses do me - last pic is the last time I used the rosebud - My old 580B can be almost as stubborn as I am... Steve
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  #39  
Old 06-04-2021, 10:16 PM
slip knot slip knot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GWIZ View Post
Does any one know what gas the turbo torch is using now a days?
you don't want get one that you can not get refilled.

I'm thinking they likely did away with the old acetylene turbo torch.
My plumber still runs an acetylene torch for his work. He had it in his truck when he came by to test the backflow preventer's.
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