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  #11  
Old 12-31-2018, 10:17 AM
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For larger holes such as windows I have used my Milwaukee metal cutting saw.
I wanted to skirt my shop as it is made of 2 seacans on screw piles.
This was done by going to a fab place where they convert cans into offices and control rooms for the oil industry and buying some scrap.
I got a piece 40 ft long and proceeded to cut two piece 34 inch by 40 ft out of it for the skirting. Done with the metal saw and one blade. I did chip a tooth when it got pinched.
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  #12  
Old 12-31-2018, 04:18 PM
BukitCase BukitCase is offline
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Gerry, dont' have one of those saws; DO have the plaz templates all ready, but don't wanna cut the holes til the mounting bezels are done (including rain shields on the windward side of ONE of the hi-cubes, it's common to see rain coming in AT LEAST 45 degrees from vertical here)

For plaz cuts that will see weld, I normally use a wide flat air chisel followed by a flap disk to get rid of dross/glaze.

I did do a "cheap-ass feasibility study" using one of these
https://www.harborfreight.com/7-14-i...tem-63290.html
and one of their "admiral" metal cutting blades (saw $29 coupon, blade $20) - Actually works better than I thought it would, piece of square tube or angle guide (and leathers + face shield ) cuts 14-16 ga. like it was 1/4" plywood, and 1/4" plate a bit slower.

Also, with the lack of shielding or chip tray it helps to have one of those "magnetic sweepers" for after

My question to you (one of MANY, sorry) is about "bridging" the wide corrugations on sea cans - when you cut your skirts, did you use/need any kind of TOP support so the saw shoe didn't try to dip up and down with corrugations, or was that NOT a problem?

I'll stop for now; I know Dubby's sayin' "just whack it and move on" - sorry Dubby, pretty much NOT in my DNA - (this time of year, OCD definitely beats "D+C" - as in, Drenched and Cold ) ...Steve
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  #13  
Old 01-01-2019, 11:52 AM
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Hey, figuring out what you're gonna do is always more fun than actually doing it. The world would be a whole different place if I did everything I thought about. Reagan's '84 campaign really inspired me...10 year old me couldn't wait to turn 35 to run for Prez myself


I studied our can/office at the range this weekend, but had left my phone in the truck so I didn't take any pictures. It was purchased with a man door and windows already installed, and security bars added on the outside of each. The inside was left unfinished. The big thing that stands out is that the areas around the cuts weren't anywhere near perfect nor straight. Most of it wasn't even filed down or smoothed out. The add-ons all have large flanges built around them to make it quick and forgiving and still water tight. It's far from sand tight though, we still have to sweep/clean every week after being locked from Sunday night through Friday morning.

I think from the amount of prep you've already done, you've got a head start on a better product than was commercially available to us.
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  #14  
Old 01-01-2019, 01:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BukitCase View Post

My question to you (one of MANY, sorry) is about "bridging" the wide corrugations on sea cans - when you cut your skirts, did you use/need any kind of TOP support so the saw shoe didn't try to dip up and down with corrugations, or was that NOT a problem?

...Steve
OK, The saw has a 3 inch depth of cut, and if I remember the corrugations are 1.75 deep so it works fine. It was able to stay up on the surface easily but I did have a chalk line snapped on it for a guide, so it was helpfull to keep from wandering.
If you are using any of these saws, with or without a chip catcher, wear eye protection. These chips are hot and hard and way bigger than grinder grit, which everyone has had as eyewash
The Mw chipcatcher works fine on flat sheets, but in this case with a dip that exposes the blade, there is a lot of shrapnel.
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  #15  
Old 01-01-2019, 02:00 PM
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LKeithR LKeithR is offline
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I used a "Metal Devil" type saw to put a window in a container a few years ago and I wouldn't do it again. First, those things are heavy and awkward and when you're perched on a ladder trying to make a straight cut it was not fun. If i could have stood on the ground it would have been different but this window was almost three ft. by five ft. and they wanted it quite close to the top of the container wall so getting up on a ladder was my only option.

Second, they're a bit hard to control and guide when you're trying to hold them on their side. The saw I used was so well shielded that you couldn't actually see the leading edge of the blade when it was cutting so it was tough to follow a line even on a flat surface--working the saw sideways and at head height was no fun.

I went back a couple years later and added a window to that same container and just used a small hand grinder and a zipcutter and it worked really well. Lines were much easier to follow and the zipcutter is a lot lighter and easier to handle. Just mark out your lines on one side of the wall, cut all the way round and then move to the inside and finish the cut. The zipcutter disk will wear down--I went through several--and not cut full depth but it's real easy to cut out the missing sections from the opposite side. Leave a tiny (1/4" or less) tab on each corner and cut them out last (bottom ones first) and you'll eliminate any binding...
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  #16  
Old 01-01-2019, 02:12 PM
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Whatever you cut with, I'd seal any gaps with 3M 5200, not silicone which has inferior wetting and poor durability.

https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/company-...3241623&rt=rud
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  #17  
Old 01-02-2019, 01:24 PM
BukitCase BukitCase is offline
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Guys, thanks for all the real world experience sharing, especially the "I pee'd on the fence and would NOT recommend it" kind

My tendency next was to irritate Cutter (too much thread drift ) so instead I'll start a "container shop" thread when I get more time, and a link to it from here to minimize confusion.

MW, that 3M 5200 is about 7 TIMES as expensive as the silicone, but if it's that much better it'd probably be worth it; at least for the connections BETWEEN containers, I do NOT want leaks there since it'll be at LEAST 2 years til I can swing the roof over the whole thing (see rudimentary-but-sorta-scaled paint sketch below) ... Steve
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  #18  
Old 01-09-2019, 09:31 PM
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monckywrench monckywrench is offline
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It's absolutely worth it (get the toothpaste tube size and experiment!) but if you want to join roofs together side-by-side an easy and economical way is to get a 4x8 sheet of 1/8" and (to join two 40's) have half of it sheared into 2" wide x 8' long strips. (The rest is left over.) You have to bridge the gap between corner fittings to join containers so the bridge might as well be welded.

If the containers aren't identical one may be higher between corner fittings than the other but no big deal. Corner fitting height is standard. I tacked the ends then stitched the high side, swatted the strip down with a mallet, repeat, then finish welded. Place a tape between yours and you'll see how a 2" strip will bridge them. I stick welded the corner fittings after grinding the joint.

For the roof I used flux core in my suitcase feeder. Ran out of .035" so I grabbed a roll of .045" and started the puddle on the container then ran it to the thinner bridging strip.

For the vertical joints I used 3M and some Pond and Stone foam as an experiment (it's UV resistant). Stuff grows on the foam so I'll eventually hog it out with a wire wheel and 3M the rest. I always 3M wall holes like my weatherhead feedthrough and the two welding panel QDs I use so I don't have to open the end doors to connect welding cables outdoors. (Inside has pigtails for connection to any of my power sources.) You could run strip there too.

Mine has been up a few years with no leaks or deterioration. I also welded an upward facing piece of channel ~10" long to the non-door end roof of one container. That securely holds my ladder. Next to it I welded a vertical pipe to the container and made a rotating jib from a loosely fitted larger pipe. It's T-shaped with a boat winch on one end of the T so I can winch tool and cutting buckets to roof height and swing them over to unload. Great back saver and safety item. If you lack a suitcase feeder, make a larger one if you want your MIG machine on the roof. You could also rent a feeder.

I used common hole saws (I forget the brand) for the weatherhead and panel connectors. A bit of spray lube saved the blades.

Last edited by monckywrench; 01-12-2019 at 11:01 PM.
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