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  #31  
Old 09-22-2006, 10:44 PM
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No worries. I don't perzactly think a video is in my future...but who the heck knows?
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  #32  
Old 09-23-2006, 09:52 AM
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Don, I hope this goes with the topic. In case you haven't seen it at the hobart site. This guy needs help. Here's the thread title..

welding to a weld plate in concrete footing
Tumbleweed



Gotta run. I'm allergic to concrete..
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  #33  
Old 09-23-2006, 10:23 AM
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Yup, I posted on it.
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  #34  
Old 09-23-2006, 10:25 AM
LeonS LeonS is offline
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Don, seeing those guys w/the comealongs makes my back hurt right now.

BTW, I was curzzin the loop out by the Dome and of course alot of construction going on, noticed a large slab these guys were finishing, the trowel machine the were using was a sit down model, cat was driving the thing sitting on top of the machine, first I'd see of such. Pretty kool.

Thanks for your effort in explaining the cement pouring process.
L*S
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  #35  
Old 09-23-2006, 11:00 AM
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No prob and thanks, Leon. The rakes don't really make my back hurt much...it is that dang screed that gets me. That pulling action gets me right where my back is injured. I can do it, but I will pay dearly for it for several days.

Yup, the riders are pretty cool. I have never run one, but the principles are much the same. The controls operate like a Bobcat/skid steer. You really need a lot of space to run one. A buddy had one for a short time. He would not even get it out unless there was more than 10,000-14,000sf. It just depended on the job. They come in two trowel and three trowel models with either big gassers or small diesels. They even have hydrostatic controls and liquid spray systems......and cup holders on the big ones! Really!
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  #36  
Old 05-13-2008, 05:46 AM
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Hi Don,

Dragging this up from the depths with some newbie questions.....

I helped out pouring shed floors years and years ago, but they were never finished with anything more than a screed as a rough surface was desirable for grip. I also tended to a guy who put in a floor in a house for my parents nearly 10 years ago but didnt pay much attention and just shovelled into the mixer for the day. so i have an idea of all this, just no recent experience.

I'm planning on pouring a 20x14 slab in a few weeks for my little shed. I'm happy out on the forms and prep work, and everything up to screeding but have some questions about the rest:

what does the jitterbug do? how far into the surface should it be pushed?

Bull float, does this happen straight away after the jitterbug?

For the finish hits you mention when using a machine to wait till you leave a footprint X deep. is there any similar rule of thumb for hand floating before throwing out a knee board to see if it'll sink and potentially making a huge mess.....

In the first finish hit you refer to cutting it open with a float and finish it with a trowel. what the difference between a float and a trowel? is a float wooden and a trowel steel? what does cutting open mean?

really appreciate your help.

I intend on printing the thread off and reading it a few more times before the big day.
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  #37  
Old 05-13-2008, 10:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnBoy View Post
Hi Don,
what does the jitterbug do? how far into the surface should it be pushed?

Bull float, does this happen straight away after the jitterbug?

For the finish hits you mention when using a machine to wait till you leave a footprint X deep. is there any similar rule of thumb for hand floating before throwing out a knee board to see if it'll sink and potentially making a huge mess.....

In the first finish hit you refer to cutting it open with a float and finish it with a trowel. what the difference between a float and a trowel? is a float wooden and a trowel steel? what does cutting open mean?

really appreciate your help.

I intend on printing the thread off and reading it a few more times before the big day.
No worries. Lessee if I can get you going here.

The Jitterbug pushes the rock down below the surface, so all you have on the immediate surface is paste. Rocks on top are irritating to try to finish as they do not stay put and create holes. You want them below the top. I also have a bullfloat that has a half corrugated face that does much the same thing. They also make a roller with a wire cage that will roll across the top and do much the same thing.

Bullfloating is done directly after the jitterbug. All other hand finishing steps are done after the bullfloat.

As far as timing for the kneeboards, it is just a matter of waiting until you can get on it and not make a huge mess. I use large boards so as to be able to gt on quickly. It takes longer to hand finish, so the quicker you can get on without making a mess, the better.

A float is wood or magnesium and has a very thick, non flexible blade. It is used just to roughly smooth the concrete out before you can trowel. The trowels have thin stainless or spring steel blades and are flexible. The blade on a float will open up a surface while the trowel blade will seal it up tighter and much smoother. Cut open means to open up the surface and let it breathe, or begin drying it out. When concrete sits after pouring, water from the mix will start to rise. Once this disappears, it will leave behind a crust. The looks of this crust will depend on the materials used in the mix. Most of the time, it will look lighter in color and very dry compared to the wet stuff. This is just a surface crust and needs to be broken open to begin the finishing process. By breaking it open, you allow even more water to escape and that helps the drying proces. If you can't break through he crust...you unfortunately waited way too long. In that case, put a LITTLE bit of water on the surface and try to work it back up. This happens often with a machine and can be dealt with semi easily, but by hand, it can be a nightmare as it takes three times the work and effort...and will get you behind on all the rest of the slab.

Does that help?
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  #38  
Old 05-13-2008, 11:17 AM
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cheers don, makes a lot more sense now.

does the jitterbug go far down? an inch or so is all I'm guessing.
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  #39  
Old 05-13-2008, 11:35 AM
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Jitty is for the very top. It wouldn't need to be more than 1/4" to 1/2" max. If you slam it down too hard, it will wreck the grade. Just pop the top hard enough to leave an imprint of the grate pattern....that is all it needs.
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  #40  
Old 06-16-2008, 08:02 PM
southonbeach southonbeach is offline
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You mentioned about sealer and saw cutting the joints right after finishing the concrete.
Which do you recomend doing first, sealing or cutting?
What kind of sealer do you use for on a shop floor?
I've heard someone talk about a slab cracking within the first 24hrs, I know all concrete cracks eventually, but is 24hrs or less a normal thing or did someone mess up?
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