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  #21  
Old 11-26-2018, 04:00 PM
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  #22  
Old 11-26-2018, 10:31 PM
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The money would have to come out of my building fund.

Basically comes down to....$2000 for a lathe or $2000 towards a well?

Then there's storage. It would be outside under a tarp. It's been raining at least one day a week here for about a month. Won't be pouring my slab anytime soon.

If my slab was already done I'd be more inclined to swing for it.

Also this isn't the only lathe I have my eye on. Just unsure of the 800 rpm top speed. It's a Monarch.
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  #23  
Old 11-27-2018, 12:30 AM
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Originally Posted by OldRedFord View Post
The money would have to come out of my building fund.

Basically comes down to....$2000 for a lathe or $2000 towards a well?

Then there's storage. It would be outside under a tarp. It's been raining at least one day a week here for about a month. Won't be pouring my slab anytime soon.

If my slab was already done I'd be more inclined to swing for it.

Also this isn't the only lathe I have my eye on. Just unsure of the 800 rpm top speed. It's a Monarch.
I know its a very tempting thing.... An this is just my opinion.
BUT....I say drill the well there will always be a good lathe or mill come along for a good price later after your all done with your building
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  #24  
Old 11-27-2018, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by toprecycler View Post
Sounds like you are interested Ron.
Not in the slightest, I have my lathe and mill.

Quote:
Originally Posted by OldRedFord View Post
The money would have to come out of my building fund.

Basically comes down to....$2000 for a lathe or $2000 towards a well?

Then there's storage. It would be outside under a tarp. It's been raining at least one day a week here for about a month. Won't be pouring my slab anytime soon.

If my slab was already done I'd be more inclined to swing for it.

Also this isn't the only lathe I have my eye on. Just unsure of the 800 rpm top speed. It's a Monarch.
Yeah having a building is a priority.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MetalWolf View Post
I know its a very tempting thing.... An this is just my opinion.
BUT....I say drill the well there will always be a good lathe or mill come along for a good price later after your all done with your building
If you are willing to drive a bit you can find the cheap enough up north of you.
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  #25  
Old 11-27-2018, 07:12 PM
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What the others said--have a rigger do it. And I'd get a quote before I even considered it again. Most riggers will know how much it weighs and if they can even bring a forklift large enough to lift it. But a rigger will know how to move it without damaging it--it is not just "lift it up"--there is a bit more to it than that otherwise it could be damaged and THEN what is it worth?
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  #26  
Old 11-28-2018, 03:45 AM
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I know a 4 foot radial drill press that a millwright dropped . They spent a good amount of time sewing that thing back together.They were tired of drilling and screwing before our head machinist was happy .23 years later it was still solid and had made 1 move .
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  #27  
Old 11-28-2018, 04:35 AM
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Originally Posted by midmosandblasting View Post
I know a 4 foot radial drill press that a millwright dropped . They spent a good amount of time sewing that thing back together.They were tired of drilling and screwing before our head machinist was happy .23 years later it was still solid and had made 1 move .
We had a rigger break a strap when moving the table on a 5" G&L Fraiser boring bar. That was a $250,000 mistake.

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  #28  
Old 11-29-2018, 07:05 AM
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I've had my Pacemaker for a while now and if I could only have one lathe, the Pacemaker would be it.

When Trever realized that I would eventually be taking the Pacemaker to Florida, he went looking.
He found an 18x54 for $2500. The seller loaded it on the trailer for him and when he got home we unloaded it and stuffed in in the garage until he builds his own shop. This was my third time moving a Pacemaker lathe. At about 8K #'s, you just have to plan out every move in advance and do everything slowly.

I will be moving my Pacemaker to FL sometime after the first of the year.

If I already had my new shop built, I would consider going up to GA for another Pacemaker.

Once you run one of these lathes, you'll know what all the fuss is about.
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  #29  
Old 11-29-2018, 07:06 PM
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Transport does not have to cost much if you do it right, and if you are competent to use a lathe and welder you don't need a rigger.

In that case ~8K or whatever is heavy duty rollback territory so any towing company can haul it, but not any towing company can pick and place it. Any suitable flatbed trailer would work too if a winch were used to load it. A rollback is much quicker and less work.

The way to safely move tippy unstable heavy loads it to put "axles" beneath them. I put together a kit of channel, industrial casters and allthread which self and friends use to move lathes, mills, tool and cutter grinders and more. The gear is designed to fit standard car trailers.

This is my gunsmithbros lathe moved with plain pipe skids bolted safely to the lathe base. For that Pacemaker I'd buy heavier stock and use whatever was handy for wheels, though pipe as shown worked very well and is superior to point-loading a surface with wheeled casters. We were in a small space with a rotten wood trailer deck and a weak wood room to pass through before final positioning but it still wasn't hard work. All movement was done by one manual Wyeth-Scott power puller with chains and snatch blocks.

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...achine-310749/

More details: http://www.chopcult.com/forum/showthread.php?t=49394

For that Pacemaker I'd use an old dually pickup truck axle (or single, rolling at less than 1MPH isn't the same as highway use) under the heavier headstock end and fab something steerable for the other, for example torching an old solid truck front axle in half to mount on the ends of a suitable box or beam. (I have a C-50 front axle I set aside just in case.) No need for a drag link connecting both sides unless you want to since movement will be so slow. You don't need tires to roll on rims and tires add height, but if it's stored outdoors having tires available would be nice. If it would be stored I'd block it up on old rims and save usable inflated tires for the actual movement.

For lathe moves we pull the drip pan and any loose dangly bits from the bottom, then safely jack from beneath the ways using wooden dunnage. You REALLY want a forklift jack if you move machinery but bottle jacks will do. I have both and a morbid lifting gear fetish (Simplex jack, ag jacks, homebuild pneumatic air bag jack).

Do one end at a time.
With one end bolted to and stabilized by the dolly/outrigger, the machine cannot tip.
Lift very slowly while shimming dunnage so the lathe cannot fall more than an inch or less. I learned to love moving slow and shimming often.
I place a wood block between jack and lathe bed, lift enough to drop precut Grade 8 allthread through the top of the levelling bolt holes in the base, then secure the nuts. We used downward-facing channel to make it even easier as it leave room for the nut and open end wrench. We bring precut allthread in our kit along with cordless tools including an angle grinder to run cutting discs.

This is safer than machinery skates, which can fly free when unloaded or easily catch on imperfect surfaces. Skates don't work on gravel, dirt or other nasty surfaces. I can throw some old mobile home channel down to roll over uneven/soft areas.

This is safer than conventional rigging. No forklift, no straps, the load is lifted as little as practical, and the load is swiftly stabilized against tipping. Loading is by winch so no manual pushing except to help steer. (Long prybars or good 4x4s are useful.)

Wanna protect it outdoors? I'd buy a case of motorcycle chain wax (not chain lube, chain wax) and drench it.

Another good reason to have a machinery moving kit is a rigger is a one time deal every time. OTOH if you set up your machines for easy movement you can do what you want, when you want, for as long as you want to.

That said, do your slab, structure and well first. You aren't a pro machinist and toys can wait. That lathe is still for sale and may be for quite a while. Meantime you can accumulate everything to move whatever you buy without paying a rigger. The longer it sits (scrap prices are in the toilet) the more eager the owner will be to get rid of it. Only old men know what old lathes are good for and most hobby users are afraid to move heavy iron.

Take your time and you'll get there quicker.

Last edited by monckywrench; 11-29-2018 at 07:12 PM.
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  #30  
Old 11-30-2018, 02:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by monckywrench View Post
That said, do your slab, structure and well first. You aren't a pro machinist and toys can wait. That lathe is still for sale and may be for quite a while. Meantime you can accumulate everything to move whatever you buy without paying a rigger. The longer it sits (scrap prices are in the toilet) the more eager the owner will be to get rid of it. Only old men know what old lathes are good for and most hobby users are afraid to move heavy iron.

Take your time and you'll get there quicker.
Plus One on that....Very good advise...…….

I've been there an done that and have spent allot of un-nessocery money
and ended up with things I did not need an then no funds to take care of the truly important things

One thing I have learned being a member here is that people "Members" give advise that is usually "The voice of reason" and from personal experiences past... and we all learn something for one or another

sometimes it may come off as sounding gruff or rough but with the best intentions at heart...

I my self would never tell someone to turn left knowing they should turn rite... and have nothing but respect for those of the same caliber...

I'm not saying I take the advise and just totally run with it as it is on us as to how we use it but I do listen and weigh "The voices of reason" and use as much of it to my advantage as I am capable of....
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