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Old 11-02-2016, 09:18 AM
Rufus Rufus is offline
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Default 7018 info needed on tee joint

Hi all:
My question concerns 7018 used in a tee joint. I was just wondering if the following picture gives the correct information before I try welding a tee joint again. The steel is 3/16 inch thick using an 1/8 inch rod. I have come to the conclusion of using 7018 rods from now on, not because 6013's are so distrusted but for the fact that 7018 seems to be the industry standard.

Thanks
Tim
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Old 11-02-2016, 09:53 AM
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Pic looks fine. With 7018 it is all about rod arc length, amps and rod movement.
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Old 11-02-2016, 10:26 AM
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Pic looks fine. With 7018 it is all about rod arc length, amps and rod movement.
Thanks. My plan of attack will be remove the mill scale, run amperage at 90 amps (as per the tombstone) and if that is to cold, go to 95 amps, angle the rod right into the corner of the joint and proceed with a speed of to where I see the puddle washing out to the sides of the rod. The gap will be at about 1/8 inch and a drag angle somewhere between 5 to 15 degrees.

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Tim
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Old 11-02-2016, 11:16 AM
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With 7018 rod I always start hot and bring the heat down as needed, for 1/8" rod I would start out with at least 125 amps. 90 amps is about right for 3/32" rod IMO.
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Old 11-02-2016, 11:42 AM
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With 7018 rod I always start hot and bring the heat down as needed, for 1/8" rod I would start out with at least 125 amps. 90 amps is about right for 3/32" rod IMO.
I will give that a shot then. 125 amps it is.

Thanks
Tim
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Old 11-02-2016, 12:14 PM
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...for the fact that 7018 seems to be the industry standard...
While 7018 is a solid and popular rod calling it a "standard" might be a bit much. Getting good results when you weld is all about choosing the right rod for each individual job. Besides 7018 you also have available 6010, 6011, 6013, 7014 and 7024. For a simple tee-joint like that any of them would work.

If I was starting with clean material I'd probably use 6013 or 7014; both will provide ample strength and good looking welds. If the material is rusty and pitted then the obvious choice is 6011; it'll cut through the crap and still make for a good strong weld--it just won't be as pretty.

My advice to beginners is to experiment; use different rods on different thicknesses of material. Get a feel for how different rods work and you'll be a much more versatile weldor in the long run...
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Old 11-02-2016, 12:38 PM
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Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
While 7018 is a solid and popular rod calling it a "standard" might be a bit much. Getting good results when you weld is all about choosing the right rod for each individual job. Besides 7018 you also have available 6010, 6011, 6013, 7014 and 7024. For a simple tee-joint like that any of them would work.

If I was starting with clean material I'd probably use 6013 or 7014; both will provide ample strength and good looking welds. If the material is rusty and pitted then the obvious choice is 6011; it'll cut through the crap and still make for a good strong weld--it just won't be as pretty.

My advice to beginners is to experiment; use different rods on different thicknesses of material. Get a feel for how different rods work and you'll be a much more versatile weldor in the long run...
KeithR:
I see where you're coming from. I have 6013s, 7018s, 7014s, and 6011s. I want to get good with 7018s then move on from there. Also, you are correct when it comes to experimenting. I am hoping to take an "enrichment adult class" on welding (no certs given, just a certificate of completion) to get some practice in, such as a Saturday class from 9:00 AM to 3:30 PM. That way I will have access to unlimited amounts of rods and metal. Oh joy That would be right up my ally.

Thanks
Tim
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Old 11-02-2016, 12:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
While 7018 is a solid and popular rod calling it a "standard" might be a bit much. Getting good results when you weld is all about choosing the right rod for each individual job. Besides 7018 you also have available 6010, 6011, 6013, 7014 and 7024. For a simple tee-joint like that any of them would work.

If I was starting with clean material I'd probably use 6013 or 7014; both will provide ample strength and good looking welds. If the material is rusty and pitted then the obvious choice is 6011; it'll cut through the crap and still make for a good strong weld--it just won't be as pretty.

My advice to beginners is to experiment; use different rods on different thicknesses of material. Get a feel for how different rods work and you'll be a much more versatile weldor in the long run...
7018 is pretty much the standard for welding structural steel, and is used a lot on pipelines. But I do agree that if you are welding things in the home shop, or not of a critical nature and where no WPS is provided experimentation is a great way to learn.

But again, if you are looking for a job stick welding it would behoove you to be proficient with 6010 and perhaps more importantly 7018.
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Old 11-02-2016, 01:14 PM
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7018 is pretty much the standard for welding structural steel, and is used a lot on pipelines. But I do agree that if you are welding things in the home shop, or not of a critical nature and where no WPS is provided experimentation is a great way to learn.

But again, if you are looking for a job stick welding it would behoove you to be proficient with 6010 and perhaps more importantly 7018.
I am just a home hobby welder. I doubt if I will ever get a job welding because of my back. However, I have always enjoyed welding and will experiment with all the rods of mentioned. I do hope to make some home projects, but nothing that life or limb will be riding on.

Thanks
Tim
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Old 11-02-2016, 01:21 PM
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I am just a home hobby welder.
Tim
Me too.
just note when the weld cools it is likely that the top will pull in so you will be less than 90 deg. that is if you only weld the one side.
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