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  #251  
Old 07-10-2019, 08:32 AM
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How deep? God knows.
I'll guess 250 ft. The water is within 8ft of the top of the casing. I tied a 12" crescent onto a 100ft tape last time I was into the well, and the tape ran out and the wrench never hit bottom.
There is 44ft of suction line on the pump, and we have never been able to pull down the water level even in the drought years.

I am starting to wonder if, because of government grants to farmers, that many wells have been drilled past the aquifer. I hear of many deep wells and very low flow. If a driller is drilling for money instead of water, he stops when the grant runs out. My neighbor 2 km away as the crow flies, has a 1500ft well drilled down into rock and has 4gpm flow. I think the water is on top of the rock.

Buddy had a well drilled about 15km away, and installed a pump and pitless head. He said around 15 thou. No idea how far down they were.
It is possible that your well is registered at Alberta Environment. Contract well drillers are required to pull permits and file reports on each well they drill. The permit info is available to the public and is searchable by land description. This system breaks down when you realize that many wells were drilled by unlicensed drillers and some were hand dug by landowners early on.

It is common practice to drill through and past the aquifer to get a debris sump and some wellbore storage. Not everyone is convinced it is necessary, but for the most part drillers are paid by the foot or meter of hole drilled.

I am not sure how one would pull 3.5" pipe and stuff 5" down the same hole. It would require reaming to make the hole larger. Might be just as cost effective to drill a new well.
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  #252  
Old 07-10-2019, 09:07 AM
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Ah, you own both ends. I had pictured it differently. Is this a Hughes net service?
No, it is Xplornet. They do both land based and satellite.

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Originally Posted by camdigger View Post
It is possible that your well is registered at Alberta Environment. Contract well drillers are required to pull permits and file reports on each well they drill. The permit info is available to the public and is searchable by land description. This system breaks down when you realize that many wells were drilled by unlicensed drillers and some were hand dug by landowners early on.

It is common practice to drill through and past the aquifer to get a debris sump and some wellbore storage. Not everyone is convinced it is necessary, but for the most part drillers are paid by the foot or meter of hole drilled.

I am not sure how one would pull 3.5" pipe and stuff 5" down the same hole. It would require reaming to make the hole larger. Might be just as cost effective to drill a new well.
I can understand a small extension for trash in the bottom, but some of these are real deep and the water is not.

I understand, and maybe incorrectly, that it is fairly easy for a well driller to ream an existing hole. My drilling knowledge is in rock and it sure is easier in that stuff. I am fairly sure that my water comes from the coalbed, and not solid rock. The coal is above the shale here. That would also explain the high volume, as a flat bed will draw water from miles around.
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  #253  
Old 07-10-2019, 11:18 AM
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Gerry, that heatline is an interesting looking product, let us know how it works out for you. Looks like they're located about an hour from where I was, right near some family cottages, I know the area well.
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  #254  
Old 07-10-2019, 12:18 PM
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$15 - $18 a foot around here.
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  #255  
Old 07-10-2019, 12:42 PM
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$15 - $18 a foot around here.
Went down and talked to my well driller neighbor about your situation. He says they make a submersible pump that will fit in your 3 1/2" steel casing. Said the pump would run about $700. He also says you should have the pipe reamed to get rid of built up scale.

https://us.grundfos.com/products/pro...well-pump.html

Also got an update on new well costs. $22 a foot now.
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  #256  
Old 07-10-2019, 05:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Ironman View Post
No, it is Xplornet. They do both land based and satellite.



I can understand a small extension for trash in the bottom, but some of these are real deep and the water is not.

I understand, and maybe incorrectly, that it is fairly easy for a well driller to ream an existing hole. My drilling knowledge is in rock and it sure is easier in that stuff. I am fairly sure that my water comes from the coalbed, and not solid rock. The coal is above the shale here. That would also explain the high volume, as a flat bed will draw water from miles around.
With careful examination of the well records, which are public data, you may be able to determine the aquifer being drawn from. You may also see if the layer you are drawing from is cased off in those wells (to avoid iron issues?) and a deeper aquifer in use. An excuse for a rainy day research project....

Looks like the SQ pump in the link Milo posted is the one for this. The others are for larger casing. 700U$D seems a bit steep. I paid 550 canuckbucks for the submersible pump I bought for 4 1/2" casing this last Feb. It wasn't a name brand though, just what was on the shelf at the local farm supply.

Water well drillers have better success pulling casing than the oilfield. Mostly because they rely on clay seals and cuttings to fill around the pipe, while most petroleum wells have cemented in casing. The other reason is that many wells are only cased as far as the first competent rock and have a liner run below. My well is all of 40' deep and I'm sure only had 25' of 6" steel casing in it. I cased it about 10 years ago with 40' of 4 1/2" sched 40 plastic pipe. I slotted the first 10' joint with a hacksaw and sealed around the top with bentonite.
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Last edited by camdigger; 07-10-2019 at 05:06 PM.
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  #257  
Old 07-10-2019, 07:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by milomilo View Post
Went down and talked to my well driller neighbor about your situation. He says they make a submersible pump that will fit in your 3 1/2" steel casing. Said the pump would run about $700. He also says you should have the pipe reamed to get rid of built up scale.

https://us.grundfos.com/products/pro...well-pump.html

Also got an update on new well costs. $22 a foot now.
There also has to be a minimum charge to cover setup costs, I think.
If I get around to doing this project in a couple of years, I think a well cleanout would be vital, so that the 700 dollar pump would not damage itself with grit and crap.
And thanks for the research, Chris. Nice to have some baseline numbers.
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  #258  
Old 07-16-2019, 08:28 PM
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I was doodling around on daTube recently and saw this video on how they set up homes in Kalifornia. Good grief, Charlie Brown

And then I wandered into Manufactured Home testing.
This is one way to do it in Lubbock, Texas.
You back a C-130 up to the house, and fire up the engines for an hour.
105mph winds at tornado speeds.
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  #259  
Old 07-28-2019, 09:28 AM
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Work continues between lightning and sun and rain. I have been skirting the deck and prepping for the skirt install on the house.

Last Wednesday, I had the wizard come over and move my satellite dish out to the shop. When I laid the fiber optic line I tested it many times and it worked fine. After the dish move I drilled a hole in the shop wall and tried stuffing the FO cable through the wall.....and damaged it.
Now I have shop internet only. Crap.
So I called a fiber optic tech, he agreed to come out and fix it, then he wanted pictures of the cable, and then gave me a quote. Then he disappeared and is not answering text or phone messages. He successfully wasted my time til Friday night.
Lying in bed that night, I thought about this. It is a duplex line and one line is damaged. This means it can run simplex. Then I thought of re-creating my exact setup that I had before, when testing. So I dragged the original router sent by the satellite vulture out to the shop, and plugged in and tried it. According to the lights on the transceiver box, my FO cable has a connection.
I can plug my laptop into the modem and get on the net. But the router will not pass data. Hmmmm.

At this point a miracle occurred. The tech on Wednesday never filed his work order, so another tech comes into the shop full of apologies and wants to move my satellite. WTF? So I said BTDT and your box is full of rocks and it don't work. He tried and verified that it was at fault, and called the company to spike the dish and they did. Then we had internet to the modem. (which, oddly enough, I had with the laptop in the morning, also)
We tried my trusty Linksys router and it would not talk to the modem. Since Xplornet sent me a free router, I have parked the Linksys for the last 4 months.

Well, look at that, once you use their Router, it uploads software that locks out all other modems
So now that I have recreated the exact system setup I had before, I plugged in the FO cable and the house is now on the net as well as the shop, using the Linksys in the house.

At the moment I'm adding additional crossbracing between the piles because I can, and because later would be very difficult, so I welded for 6 hrs yesterday till I was too crippled, and back at it today.
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Last edited by Ironman; 07-28-2019 at 09:37 AM.
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  #260  
Old 07-28-2019, 09:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by milomilo View Post
Went down and talked to my well driller neighbor about your situation.
Also got an update on new well costs. $22 a foot now.
I contacted a recommended drilling co. and they said they cannot pull a well casing. They will move over 10 ft and drill a new one for $40 a ft. The county records show the wells in the area are 160-180ft deep.
So I got an all in quote of between 6500 to 9000 dollars.
I can live without it.
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