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  #11  
Old 11-02-2016, 04:48 PM
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platypus20 platypus20 is offline
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Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
While 7018 is a solid and popular rod calling it a "standard" might be a bit much. ...

I guess it depends in what industry your in, in mine, 7018 is not only the standard, its basically the only rod to use on pipes and boilers. They may use 6010 and/or 6011, for the root, but absolutely everything else is 7018. You won't see any 6013, 7014, or 7024, on any jobsite.

The only options I see, is whether its Lincoln Excaliber 7018 or its Esab AtomArc 7018
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Old 11-02-2016, 06:56 PM
Rufus Rufus is offline
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Perhaps with me being a home hobby welder, I suppose there wouldn't be an industry standard. I have thought about trying to weld up some art work and nothing that would put life and limb in danger. I once saw a dog welded up and between the head and body there was a spring that was springy enough to where when the wind would blow the head would bob up and down. I would like to know where to buy a spring like that. Maybe buy some big nuts and bolts and weld up some sculptures out of them. Things like that, or perhaps some metal jigs for various things that I might want to weld up and again those things wouldn't put life or limb in danger.

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Tim
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  #13  
Old 11-02-2016, 08:30 PM
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Originally Posted by platypus20 View Post
I guess it depends in what industry your in, in mine, 7018 is not only the standard, its basically the only rod to use on pipes and boilers. They may use 6010 and/or 6011, for the root, but absolutely everything else is 7018. You won't see any 6013, 7014, or 7024, on any jobsite.

The only options I see, is whether its Lincoln Excaliber 7018 or its Esab AtomArc 7018
Pretty much same same for me. One difference was I would grab Hobart or Eutectic rod if it was available.
The only thing Lincoln rod is good for is knock the flux off and use it for tie wire...or filler material if you must.
I did like AtomArc..

One thing about your diagram, on your rod angle, don't get too hung up on maintaining the exact angle.

What is more important is the puddle.

You have to keep the puddle looking a certain way and you will absolutely have to move your rod practically non stop. Every little twitch of the rod affects the puddle and will show up in the finished weld.
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  #14  
Old 11-02-2016, 09:36 PM
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I don't want it to sound like I don't use or haven't used other rods. I started liking 7014 when I started stick welding. The only reason I don't use it now is anything I would do with 7014 I can do with 7018. No reason to stock 2.

I still use 6011 for non critical things. I used to hate it because I was forced to use it in a previous job. But it's great because it starts easily and is very tolerant of impurities. The downside is the deposition rate is really low, so it takes forever.

I keep 6013 around just because I enjoy using it occasionally.

I used to love stick welding aluminum. Probably because I enjoyed the look of disbelief on people's faces.
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Old 11-03-2016, 06:42 AM
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I would use 3 /32 rod, less heat means less warpage.

If the joint is going to be long, you can tack pieces of steel to the bottom outside edge of the flat and to the top of the upright in few locations to help keep the upright straight while the work piece cools down.

Also I wouldn't weld only on one side if the weld is going to be long, 3/16 isn't that thick. I would weld two or three inches on one side, jump across to the other side and from the other end start coming back towards the first weld, so distortion is kept to a minimum. Tack weld the ends and middle or in a few places, depending on how long the work is.

Last edited by tackit; 11-03-2016 at 06:48 AM.
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  #16  
Old 11-03-2016, 11:59 AM
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When my back eases up I am going to give it a shot and post some pictures. Because the VA's pain clinic is backed up they are sending me to a pain management doctor outside of the VA and my first appointment will be Monday I can't wait

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Tim
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Old 11-03-2016, 02:05 PM
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After many tries here is the best I could do. 3/16 inch tee joint, 1/8 inch 7018, running 115 amps. I did have another one that had a wider weld bead, but it come out looking like a mess. As you can tell, there is potential however I do need a lot of practice.

Thanks
Tim
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  #18  
Old 11-03-2016, 03:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Rufus View Post
When my back eases up I am going to give it a shot and post some pictures. Because the VA's pain clinic is backed up they are sending me to a pain management doctor outside of the VA and my first appointment will be Monday I can't wait

Thanks
Tim
I glad to hear your going to see a doctor, I hope they can help you.

Pain takes all the fun out of life... it takes along time to except it and know when it's time to take a break. Good luck

It's takes time to find the bead look you'll end up with, your weld is like your personal signature, you'll get better at it with practice.

Pay attention to heat, travel and rod angle and don't put a death grip on your rod holder.

Toss the whip over your shoulder so the whole weight of the wire isn't being held in your welding hand. Use two hands, always steady yourself when you can by putting your hip against the table or by hanging a pipe wrench off something close by so you can lay your arm on it to steady yourself..
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  #19  
Old 11-03-2016, 04:01 PM
JBFab JBFab is offline
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There is an acronym around for stick welding: CLAMS

Current
Length of arc
Angle of electrode
Manipulation of electrode
Speed of travel

Get all that right and you can't go wrong.

I'm not sure who came up with the acronym, I heard it from one of Jody Collier's YouTube videos (weldingtipsandtricks).

That being said, your posted attempt doesn't look too bad. Once you got it going it was pretty damn good.

Try traveling a little quicker at the start to avoid the buildup, and either pause or backstep a little at the end to prevent a crater.

It looks like you have figured out how to be steady through the middle, with 7018 and a few others you can actually lay the rod right in the joint with just the right amount of pressure and lay a real nice bead.
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  #20  
Old 11-03-2016, 04:21 PM
Rufus Rufus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBFab View Post
There is an acronym around for stick welding: CLAMS

Current
Length of arc
Angle of electrode
Manipulation of electrode
Speed of travel

Get all that right and you can't go wrong.

I'm not sure who came up with the acronym, I heard it from one of Jody Collier's YouTube videos (weldingtipsandtricks).

That being said, your posted attempt doesn't look too bad. Once you got it going it was pretty damn good.

Try traveling a little quicker at the start to avoid the buildup, and either pause or backstep a little at the end to prevent a crater.

It looks like you have figured out how to be steady through the middle, with 7018 and a few others you can actually lay the rod right in the joint with just the right amount of pressure and lay a real nice bead.
Thanks. I think I had the arc length a little to short. I notice on another tee joint weld that I ran, the weld bead was a little wider. I plan on continuing to weld 3/16 with the 1/8 rods with the amperage being 115 DC+ on the tombstone but for 1/4 and on up, I will switch to my Miller Thunderbolt and run AC at higher amps. Actually, at one time when I went out to the Missouri Welding Institute, I got good at running tee joints One fella that had been out in the field for a while said my tee joints looked better than a guy that had been welding for 20 years. Yeah, I will get better

Thanks
Tim
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