Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Blacksmithing & Forming

SFT Search:   
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #61  
Old 08-30-2012, 09:45 PM
kiwi's Avatar
kiwi kiwi is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 854
Default

Beautiful job.
Nick
Reply With Quote
  #62  
Old 08-31-2012, 09:02 AM
allessence's Avatar
allessence allessence is online now
Gadget Girl
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: MA, 01543
Posts: 6,426
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Lee View Post
Nice job on the apron, Jen. It's great to have someone like your friend to turn to, to get you through a project. I gotta say, you're one hard working lady!

Dave
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boogity View Post
Thanks, Jen. I had an idea but needed some backup 'cause I do get things wrong sometimes. OK, a lot.


Thanks guys.. It's been a learning process.. I'm still amazed at how strong leather can really be..

I went yesterday back to see Mr Pelkey to do a few modifications to the apron.. At this point I have 2 shoeings and 10 trims and I found that with the pad leather as thick as it is though getting more supple was increasing the amount of labor going out into the trimming/shoeing since every rasp stroke was being diverted by the lower part of the apron..

My worst fears have been realized as with any proto type it's money well spent but also it's money spent..

So, back to the pictures..

I had the bottom portion of the apron modified to configure more around my knee which I hope makes it easier to get my rasp into position..

Ideally I can see another apron coming down the road sometime soon as is another set of hoof knives and a new hoof stand..

The new apron will be made from oil tanned Bison with oil tanned Bison knee pads.. The flexibility of this stuff is good but also stronger..


1,2, 3 are off the modifications.. Reason why I don't like the mod is it puts the stitching right in line with the rasp and is the reason why I designed the apron with full pads instead of just a pad over the knee..

The 4th pic is of the interior part of the foot for those that are curious..

Never know if it comes up on trivia pursuit..
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	20120830_124039.jpg
Views:	137
Size:	96.2 KB
ID:	94904   Click image for larger version

Name:	20120830_124047.jpg
Views:	150
Size:	96.2 KB
ID:	94905   Click image for larger version

Name:	20120831_090257.jpg
Views:	146
Size:	99.5 KB
ID:	94906   Click image for larger version

Name:	BASICHOOFANATOMY_002.jpg
Views:	153
Size:	56.5 KB
ID:	94907  
__________________
_________________
Jennifer

If I defend myself I am attacked.

My meaningless thoughts are showing me a meaningless world.

My attack thoughts are attacking my invulnerability.

I'd like to think of something smart, but I don't want to hurt myself.

My google+ page

DoALL 36"
Another Johnson model J Project
Lathe? Maybe..... 1958 SBL 13"
Yeti Esseti Aka running welder on 3phase.
Reply With Quote
  #63  
Old 08-31-2012, 09:28 AM
JWS's Avatar
JWS JWS is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: North West Indiana
Posts: 1,353
Default

Don't cha just hate breaking in a new apron??!!! Like getting a new pair of boots. uuuuugggggghhhhhhhh. Steel toed boots, in 1977 went to an Amishman's shop as he had a dealership in boots, while waiting for him to finish shoeing this big belgian gelding that horse which had to of weighed close to a ton jumped straight up in the air, all four hooves off of the ground and landed on the toe of the guy's foot. Landed on the rear of the steel toe, curled it into the man's foot basically where his toes attach to his feet. Ended up cutting his boot off of his foot, still had to go to the hospital. Didn't buy steel toed boots that day or any day. Have had all toes broken at one time or another.
When I went to shoeing school, the instructor had a garden hose running and had all of us take our new shoeing aprons and throw them in that mudhole. He said nothing screamed "greenhorn" more than a bunch of new aprons! I have my welding students throw their new greens on the floor and walk on them also.
Reply With Quote
  #64  
Old 09-01-2012, 07:39 AM
Brian C.'s Avatar
Brian C. Brian C. is offline
Director of Security
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Waverly, OH
Posts: 2,848
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JWS View Post
When I went to shoeing school, the instructor had a garden hose running and had all of us take our new shoeing aprons and throw them in that mudhole. He said nothing screamed "greenhorn" more than a bunch of new aprons! I have my welding students throw their new greens on the floor and walk on them also.
Sounds like some rookie Firefighters I have seen rooting around in charred debris trying to look like they have done something.
__________________
"Getting old aint for sissies"

Admit nothing, deny everything, demand proof

Millermatic 211
Harris oxy/act.
2 propane forges
147 lb. Peter Wright anvil
Reply With Quote
  #65  
Old 09-01-2012, 09:35 AM
allessence's Avatar
allessence allessence is online now
Gadget Girl
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: MA, 01543
Posts: 6,426
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JWS View Post
Don't cha just hate breaking in a new apron??!!! Like getting a new pair of boots. uuuuugggggghhhhhhhh. Steel toed boots, in 1977 went to an Amishman's shop as he had a dealership in boots, while waiting for him to finish shoeing this big belgian gelding that horse which had to of weighed close to a ton jumped straight up in the air, all four hooves off of the ground and landed on the toe of the guy's foot. Landed on the rear of the steel toe, curled it into the man's foot basically where his toes attach to his feet. Ended up cutting his boot off of his foot, still had to go to the hospital. Didn't buy steel toed boots that day or any day. Have had all toes broken at one time or another.
When I went to shoeing school, the instructor had a garden hose running and had all of us take our new shoeing aprons and throw them in that mudhole. He said nothing screamed "greenhorn" more than a bunch of new aprons! I have my welding students throw their new greens on the floor and walk on them also.
Ah, glad to hear I'm not the only person who has had that experience.. I have gotten good over the years at being able to curl my toes up in my shoes for that once or twice a year time when the horse does decide to step on my toes.

I'm not ashamed of having a new apron. Mind you I don't think I would take an apron that costs 250-300.00 and throw it into a mud puddle..

My last apron cost me 68.00 and that was the one I just retired. The new apron I bought which I returned was 264.00 and the one I just made cost me 320.00.

I think now that items cost so much that they should get better respect..

GE 15" nippers 200.00 per pair
saveedge 14" rasp 27.00 each
Prefferd hoof mill 56.00 each..

1 horse shoe nail 10 cents each..


I think my tool box has more than quadrupled in price in the last 10 years.
__________________
_________________
Jennifer

If I defend myself I am attacked.

My meaningless thoughts are showing me a meaningless world.

My attack thoughts are attacking my invulnerability.

I'd like to think of something smart, but I don't want to hurt myself.

My google+ page

DoALL 36"
Another Johnson model J Project
Lathe? Maybe..... 1958 SBL 13"
Yeti Esseti Aka running welder on 3phase.
Reply With Quote
  #66  
Old 09-01-2012, 11:23 AM
JWS's Avatar
JWS JWS is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: North West Indiana
Posts: 1,353
Default

You have THE BEST nippers made with those GE's! They are life saving sharp letting us use less energy cutting hooves. I bought new rasps monthly as they were the most labor intensive tool and dull ones cut my productivity. New one used on only hooves, old one under nails and meeting hoof to shoe. Funny thing, had a guy that thought I was nuts and would buy my old rasps for darn near what I paid new so it really didn't cost me any money. Now I wish I had a pile of them for making damascus (sp?) knife blanks. The preferred hoof mill you talk of, don't know what you mean. Tried to google it but a bunch of junk came up. Would be interested in seeing it if you can find it online so I can read about it. I actually don't wear my apron now that I use my shoeing stocks. My daughters wear it as they like to do quick touch up on the hooves before they and their husbands go on a ride as I don't keep them "manicured" enough for them! Kind of neat watching my daughters do that job and their husbands stand with a weird look on their faces as they don't really understand the job as they aren't "horsemen".
Reply With Quote
  #67  
Old 09-01-2012, 12:02 PM
Rich59 Rich59 is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Snellville GA
Posts: 189
Default

I feel your pain on the cost of tools and consumables. Recently needed to replace my seven year old Dewalt cordless drill and circular saw. Thought I was going to have to get a mortgage to make the purchase.

Same day I ordered up consumables for my plasma cutter. Found out I had spent about $30 worth helping my nephew get the front fenders off his 48 ford pickup. Money and time well spent but when you look at the nozzles it's hard to understand why they are so costly.
Reply With Quote
  #68  
Old 09-01-2012, 01:56 PM
allessence's Avatar
allessence allessence is online now
Gadget Girl
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: MA, 01543
Posts: 6,426
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JWS View Post
You have THE BEST nippers made with those GE's! They are life saving sharp letting us use less energy cutting hooves. I bought new rasps monthly as they were the most labor intensive tool and dull ones cut my productivity. New one used on only hooves, old one under nails and meeting hoof to shoe. Funny thing, had a guy that thought I was nuts and would buy my old rasps for darn near what I paid new so it really didn't cost me any money. Now I wish I had a pile of them for making damascus (sp?) knife blanks. The preferred hoof mill you talk of, don't know what you mean. Tried to google it but a bunch of junk came up. Would be interested in seeing it if you can find it online so I can read about it. I actually don't wear my apron now that I use my shoeing stocks. My daughters wear it as they like to do quick touch up on the hooves before they and their husbands go on a ride as I don't keep them "manicured" enough for them! Kind of neat watching my daughters do that job and their husbands stand with a weird look on their faces as they don't really understand the job as they aren't "horsemen".
Wow, did you get a set of portable stocks?

I love your Daugters have taken up the calling.. I love seeing other women getting out there and doing stuff.. It's been very freeing over the years..

I've attached a pic of the rasp as well as a PDF.

Should explain it more.. I have found that the hoof planes work well but I wouldn't say they are worth the extra money..

One place that I do see an advantage is I don't cut my fingers on them unlike a new rasp..

I don't wear gloves when I work..
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	hufhobel_kombi.jpg
Views:	107
Size:	14.8 KB
ID:	94938  
Attached Files
File Type: pdf PFERD_Hoof_Plane.pdf (388.1 KB, 89 views)
__________________
_________________
Jennifer

If I defend myself I am attacked.

My meaningless thoughts are showing me a meaningless world.

My attack thoughts are attacking my invulnerability.

I'd like to think of something smart, but I don't want to hurt myself.

My google+ page

DoALL 36"
Another Johnson model J Project
Lathe? Maybe..... 1958 SBL 13"
Yeti Esseti Aka running welder on 3phase.
Reply With Quote
  #69  
Old 09-01-2012, 01:59 PM
allessence's Avatar
allessence allessence is online now
Gadget Girl
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: MA, 01543
Posts: 6,426
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich59 View Post
I feel your pain on the cost of tools and consumables. Recently needed to replace my seven year old Dewalt cordless drill and circular saw. Thought I was going to have to get a mortgage to make the purchase.

Same day I ordered up consumables for my plasma cutter. Found out I had spent about $30 worth helping my nephew get the front fenders off his 48 ford pickup. Money and time well spent but when you look at the nozzles it's hard to understand why they are so costly.

I used to not worry about replacement costs of things so much, but now that the price of items have gone up consistantly over the years and the profits per hour have diminished it seems I'm counting just about every nickel..

I guess with that being said it's the reason why I get so much done with so little. Or I guess what I should have said is it used to be that way..
__________________
_________________
Jennifer

If I defend myself I am attacked.

My meaningless thoughts are showing me a meaningless world.

My attack thoughts are attacking my invulnerability.

I'd like to think of something smart, but I don't want to hurt myself.

My google+ page

DoALL 36"
Another Johnson model J Project
Lathe? Maybe..... 1958 SBL 13"
Yeti Esseti Aka running welder on 3phase.
Reply With Quote
  #70  
Old 09-01-2012, 03:06 PM
platypus20's Avatar
platypus20 platypus20 is offline
Boiler God
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: camillus, ny (syracuse)
Posts: 9,598
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich59 View Post
Same day I ordered up consumables for my plasma cutter. Found out I had spent about $30 worth helping my nephew get the front fenders off his 48 ford pickup. Money and time well spent but when you look at the nozzles it's hard to understand why they are so costly.
By the time I figure in cutting speed, consumable durability, time saved and a few other factors, I find plasma cutter consumables to be rather cheap. I've find the consumables, with clean dry air, last a long time and I cut slimy, scaly and dirty steel on a day to day basis.
__________________
jack
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.