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  #11  
Old 04-10-2009, 09:12 AM
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Originally Posted by cutter View Post
So who's this Zippy & where the hell have you been hanging out?
Possibly referring to Zippy the Chimp--I can remember a roller skating Chimpanzee in some kids book I had way back in my childhood days (surprised I can remember that, as half the time I can't remember where I put my reading glasses 2 minutes ago).
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  #12  
Old 04-10-2009, 09:19 AM
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Nope...not even close.
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  #13  
Old 04-10-2009, 12:40 PM
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My younger son took one TIG course and got a 3 month job repair welding Inconel turbine blades at Alstom. Very small beads stacked one on top of the other, critical interpass temps & etc. He had no problem with the cert. (He is good with a torch.) You can learn TIG.
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  #14  
Old 04-10-2009, 02:06 PM
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Inconel
Ish. That and monel always gave me a rash. I hated doing tig repairs on the overlays on gun mounts. Usually the ones who tell you how hard tig welding is don't want you to try and find out how easy it is. Go for it.
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  #15  
Old 04-10-2009, 02:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder View Post
20% duty cycle... that just scares me....
I think the torch would get too hot by the time you exceed the duty cycle... :evil:
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Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder View Post
But we can get you welding better than
Zippy in a day or two maybe less.
Is that Zippy of underground comics fame?
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  #16  
Old 04-10-2009, 03:25 PM
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#1 get the biggest machine you can afford. small duty cycles suck....especially when you are waiting for them to cool.

#2 it takes mabey months of practice to be able to lay down an awesome bead time after time on any given material, to make a strong, decent looking weld on one material....a few days.

get your machine, hit us up for start settings, make some welds, post some pics and we'll walk you through it
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  #17  
Old 04-10-2009, 08:28 PM
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I started off on a Miller econotig. Good to learn on, bad to use. Very easy to outgrow a small welder.

I was self taught, so it was a hard learning curve. Start with steel. About an hour to get the basics. Maybe 5 hours to have small jobs that you could send out without someone laughing at you. 20 hours or so and I was pretty confident.

Aluminum on the other hand I never made past the point where I could turn out repeatable quality. Now I have no machine to practice with
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  #18  
Old 04-10-2009, 10:01 PM
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If you can gas weld, you can tig.
Watch your puddle, and keep your electrode out of it!!

Jim is 100% right on this when I bought my Syncrowave I had never picked up a TIG torch but had oxy welded for years. I had the basics down in a few nights of welding scrap together and the welds looked and bend tested good.
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  #19  
Old 04-11-2009, 09:55 AM
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Originally Posted by USMCPOP View Post
My younger son took one TIG course and got a 3 month job repair welding Inconel turbine blades at Alstom. Very small beads stacked one on top of the other, critical interpass temps & etc. He had no problem with the cert. (He is good with a torch.) You can learn TIG.
Inconel... Alstom.... I wonder if I've seen some of your son's handiwork at my power plant? We replaced most of our turbines over the past few years. Thank him for his good work. Those things can wreak havoc if they let loose at 1800 rpm. Housings break, hydrogen explodes, everything burns, folks die. My hat is off to him.
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  #20  
Old 04-11-2009, 10:27 AM
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Thanks, I'll pass that on. He was good, but decided that 10 hours a day of welding little 1/8" wide caterpillar beads one on top of each other to build up the eroded tips would drive him crazy eventually. He took quality very seriously. I think they were mainly working on gas units. I recall him grousing about how hard it was to remove the blades and clean the varnish off them.
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