Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Mechanical & Electrical

 
 
SFT Search:
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #131  
Old 06-24-2005, 05:49 PM
jpill's Avatar
jpill jpill is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Nogalus Prairie, Texas
Posts: 546
Default

I didn't figure putting it on a truck for the "practicality"/"relativity" comparison Don. Most guys don't own a 3/4 ton or 1 ton unless they are already hauling something heavy, but most everyone has a 1/2 ton truck or vehicle capable of pulling any of those machines on a trailer.

If the machines were to be mounted on a vehicle thats the key where "practical" comes into play.

Jeff
Reply With Quote
  #132  
Old 06-24-2005, 06:01 PM
DDA52's Avatar
DDA52 DDA52 is offline
Blood, Sweat & Concrete
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Bulverde, Tx.
Posts: 6,716
Send a message via MSN to DDA52
Default

I was just saying it...not looking at any practicality aspect. I personally don't like my machines on a trailer. I have to pull a trailer all the time and am very happy not to have to do it when possible. I also had a welder die as a result of a trailer. It was bouncing all the time and it ended up killing it. It was repaired and worked, but just wasn't the same after...sold it for $50 more than I paid for it though. It was a Blue Star 2E. I think it was just too light for the trailer. It didn't bounce when it had a good load on it. The welder always bounced. ( A SA is a very good load. No bouncy, bouncy there.)
__________________
Don



Grand High Poobah...(by appointment.)
Reply With Quote
  #133  
Old 06-24-2005, 06:19 PM
jpill's Avatar
jpill jpill is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Nogalus Prairie, Texas
Posts: 546
Default

I understand fully on the not wanting to pull a trailer.

I was just trying to make a somewhat apples to apples comparison for Marko.

Course he'll probably torch out the top of his hearse and mount the SA in it.

How much are those things rated for anyway Marko?

Jeff
Reply With Quote
  #134  
Old 06-24-2005, 07:07 PM
Markopolo's Avatar
Markopolo Markopolo is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: West-central Florida
Posts: 1,833
Default

I'm not sure a hearse would be up to the task.

You know, they're built on limousine chassis......not truck chassis.

If I put a heavy customer in the back.....say 300 lbs. body weight.....and another 150 - 200 lbs. for the coffin.......(we're still under 1000 lbs).......And that will cause the coach to hog down noticeably.
__________________
Director of Equipment (by appointment)
"I'll be the LAST person to let you down"
Jezynowka !
Reply With Quote
  #135  
Old 06-24-2005, 07:20 PM
Sberry's Avatar
Sberry Sberry is offline
GOD of Strawberries!!!
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 3,905
Default

Thats a bit what I was talking with Marko about being practical. Where he lives there isnt a lot of heavy industry but there would be a fair mout of small work, the type of thing a guy could do in an evening or weekend, handrail, burgler bars, maintance, even a few welds for sign installers, stuff you wouldnt need to be insured to the gills for, gates, just general stuff. None of it is big time critical and a couple 10# boxes of rod will last a year. I would be looking to outfit something light like York did, quiet as you could get it, something a guy could sell if he wanted to change or found a niche, somethig with AC power you could use in a pinch, make it easy to tow or better yet find an older 3/4 ton truck, keep some basic tools, sawzall, grinder, torch, few wrenches, a couple hammers, a hammer drill and see what happens. I like an older truck better than a trailer, maybe a rack on it to haul some steel, something you wouldnt worry about dings and bumps and people are not as tempted to hit it in traffic.
Reply With Quote
  #136  
Old 06-24-2005, 07:41 PM
jpill's Avatar
jpill jpill is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Nogalus Prairie, Texas
Posts: 546
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sberry27
Thats a bit what I was talking with Marko about being practical.
Theres that dirty word again "practical" .

But, I do see the point of trying to keep quiet around the retirees. Thats where the big azzed muffler would probably have to come in.

As far as the matter of auxillary power thats where I hurt at I've got a 7" ac/dc grinder and two 4 1/2" ac/dc grinders in the tool box, but I am always wishing for my chopsaw or a place to plug it in (its ac only and stays in the shop). But a small ac generator nestled in its own private toolbox could solve that.

Jeff
Reply With Quote
  #137  
Old 06-24-2005, 08:03 PM
Markopolo's Avatar
Markopolo Markopolo is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: West-central Florida
Posts: 1,833
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sberry27
.......small work, the type of thing a guy could do in an evening or weekend, handrail, burgler bars, maintance, even a few welds for sign installers........
Cary.....You hit the nail right on the head !......I'd LOVE to do stuff like that !
__________________
Director of Equipment (by appointment)
"I'll be the LAST person to let you down"
Jezynowka !
Reply With Quote
  #138  
Old 06-24-2005, 08:06 PM
jpill's Avatar
jpill jpill is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Nogalus Prairie, Texas
Posts: 546
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DDA52
I agree with it being a wash either way. The only way I can see it being cheaper is by finding a fixer upper..which is usually more expensive in the long run...and or finding a used small machine.
Before I bought my machine I looked at the fixer upper route and decided quick I would rather be working the welder than having the welder work me. That route is ok if you already have a running and working machine to do work with to fund the fixer upper, and you have the knowledge to do the wrenching yourself.

All of the used small machines I looked at had either had the dog run out of them with high hours (close to rebuild or new engine time) or the guy wanted almost as much as new would cost and wouldn't budge on price.

Plus I just like the SA-200 (and I'm a sucker for a open exhaust on a flathead four).

Jeff
Reply With Quote
  #139  
Old 06-24-2005, 08:38 PM
arcdawg arcdawg is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,973
Default cary is right

marko, you live close enough to ocala and crystal river..........humm horse farms and boats........

so lets see trailer repair/gates/farm eq/ ect...........

if you put $10,000 together you could get a good relieable 4wd pick up/ and trailblazer/ranger8 tools......insurance ect ect.. @ $25 an hour 4 hour min you could really clean up !

I do however understand where you are coming from there is something about what you want........but is it really practial ?

hell I have a 55 belair 4door sitting in my barn bought it close to 10 years ago and never have had it on the road........while I would love to be cruising in it..........well its just not practial

(reality sucks sometime)

dawg
Reply With Quote
  #140  
Old 06-24-2005, 10:21 PM
Franz Franz is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 5,731
Default

Well, since I own both a SA and a LP powered Onan Bobcat, and we all know which machine is for sale, maybe I'm not the best guy to offer an opinion here. If we were to go back 3 years in time, the Bobcat would be a Trailblazer, primarily because of the 3 phase alternator rather than the single phase alternator, but I must confess that may be more a decision based on theory than machine performence. I've owned 2 SAs since 1966, the first went to shidt cause it was parked in a damp building, and the engine wasn't corked up. When we popped the head, the cylinders were full of rust that looked like cornflakes, and the pistons were frozen to the cylinder walls, so it became a parts machine.
The one I currently have gets it's intake, exhaust and oil bypass tube corked when it gets shut down for any period of time.
I don't pound rods 8 hours a day any more, so I really don't need the machine the SA is, although there is no subsititute for rotating mass in a generator. On the other hand, I don't miss listening to the SA all day either. Another thing I don't miss is dragging out 400 feet of cable from the SA sitting outside of a building. I can put the Bobcat inside a building, run it up on an elevator, even a passenger elevator, and run it 20 feet from where I'm working. Yup, the Bobcat is just as loud as the SA, but it's real easy to go 20 feet and shut it down when I'm not welding, and in the work I do, actual welding probably doesn't happen more than 10% of the time overall.
One thing I definitely dislike about the Bobcat, the cheap Chink tires Miller put on the machine. Those things should be crammed up some engineer's a55 without tire lube or vaselene. One of these days, I'll replace them with boat trailer tires.
It's a lot easier to get a crane operator to swing the bobcat up onto a roof or deck than it is to get him to put the SA up there too, and I have yet to get biched at for putting that "Big heavy machine" anyplace like I have been for putting the Lincoln in the work area.

From memory, a gasket kit for the Continental is almost 200 bucks, and even though it includes damn near enough extra gaskets to rebuild another motor, none of them fit the 163 engine, so that isn't a happy factor.
Oil changes, probably about equal, BUT the Bobcat WILL get an oil change every 50 hours, come hell or high water. Oil is one hell of a lot cheaper than engine parts.
The bobcat also makes a nice heat source, and that can be a factor here, especially in winter.
Another thing that concerns me from time to time, the Bobcat is far more stealable than the SA, but it's also very easy to lock down, or put on a truck and bring it home.
As far as using the machine for AC power, I don't do that enough for it to be a consideration, I have generators to serve that purpose. From time to time, I have used it, but I hate listening to a machine running 3600 rpm to make electricity, it just puts too much wear on the machine for what you're getting.

Now, I also own 3 operational SA-250 verticles, one of which is more or less permanently located in my buddy's automotive shop, and has saved me having to drive 40 miles to make a weld more than once. I don't need to run a engine drive at home to have a DC welder any more, although I did exactly that back until 66.
Bottom line, a machine pretty much needs to justify itself. Were I pounding rod like JT is, I'd probably run a Diesel SA. For my current needs, the Bobcat does just fine.
I think one of the best indicators of the durability of the small 2 cylinder machines is an erection outfit that works in this area. They run a fleet of 1 ton trucks with a pair of Trailblazers racked on top of the sideboxes. They have 100 feet of lead on the machine, and use a crane to lift the machine into place from the truck if they can't get close enough with the truck. They have machines in service for 5 years, and then trade them in. They don't seem to have many problems with trailblazers running 10,000 hours in 5 years, but they do maintain them with a preventive maintainence program.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:40 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, vBulletin Solutions Inc.