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  #21  
Old 02-07-2019, 10:42 PM
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milomilo milomilo is offline
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Does yours come in one or two pieces?
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  #22  
Old 02-08-2019, 12:19 AM
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Does yours come in one or two pieces?
One chunk
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  #23  
Old 02-08-2019, 12:34 AM
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My house is 27x54 and was brought on site in two pieces. Had been described to me as a "modular" home. It's on wood cribbing only. Screw piles would not be a benefit in my area. The area under the house is framed in and insulated and stays warm enough the bare lines running from the ground to the house dont freezer in the coldest weather. The lines do however freeze below ground if the heat tapes aren't plugged in. The lines are about 3ft from the outside of the house so the frost creeps under and gets them.
Yes, Kev, that is how I understand the terminology, and I was surprised as how the vendors changed it all. Are your underground lines insulated or just under the dirt? If deep enough they will be ok.
Sounds like you have rocky ground.
I have looked under a lot of skirts lately. ( i know, Bill Cosby and I were roommates) I see the vinyl insulated panels are popular, or cheap, or both. This trailer is equipped with them, I'll get the skirting when I have to haul all the scrap shit away from the former site. I see most of the panels have holes shot into them from sighting in lawnmowers. I will put up something, probably the free stuff, but guys are saying use pressure treated plywood and cover with those fieldstone panels. Too far down the road to worry about yet.
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Last edited by Ironman; 02-08-2019 at 12:41 AM.
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  #24  
Old 02-08-2019, 08:07 AM
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Best way is to excavate a hole about a foot bigger than the perimeter of the MH. Dig down about 15’, then set the MH in the hole and backfill and compact.
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  #25  
Old 02-08-2019, 09:12 AM
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Good for you folks. Are you putting it in east of the house?

H
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  #26  
Old 02-08-2019, 09:18 AM
KevinF KevinF is offline
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Yes, Kev, that is how I understand the terminology, and I was surprised as how the vendors changed it all. Are your underground lines insulated or just under the dirt? If deep enough they will be ok.
Sounds like you have rocky ground.
I have looked under a lot of skirts lately. ( i know, Bill Cosby and I were roommates) I see the vinyl insulated panels are popular, or cheap, or both. This trailer is equipped with them, I'll get the skirting when I have to haul all the scrap shit away from the former site. I see most of the panels have holes shot into them from sighting in lawnmowers. I will put up something, probably the free stuff, but guys are saying use pressure treated plywood and cover with those fieldstone panels. Too far down the road to worry about yet.

Its pure sand to 38ft. Fairly uniform and and fine to medium grained. Its a well drained material and not really susceptible to frost heave or differential settlement.

I believe the water lines are wrapped with the heat tape and insulated below ground. They run deep enough, 9 to 10ft, but the part that is the problem is where it comes vertically up. It would probably be fine if it was right in the middle of the house but its only 3-4 ft in. When the old fella built my shop, he ran the water line vertically up the outside wall. It would freeze every winter. When I did the reno I dug down and moved it 12 feet inside the footprint. No issues since.
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  #27  
Old 02-08-2019, 09:21 AM
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Andy, that's exactly what I plan to do....with the house I live in. But I plan to burn it first.
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  #28  
Old 02-08-2019, 09:47 AM
KevinF KevinF is offline
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Maybe you don't want to spend the effort, time or money, but have you considered putting it on a preserved wood basement? Here are my reasons for wishing I had a basement under my current house:
Furnace is noisy F$%^! and you can't close it in because the house doesn't have cold air returns. Turn the TV up to 100 when it kicks on. Would like to have the furnace or even just the fan downstairs.
Would like to have laundry downstairs and other utilities like water softener downstairs. Any water potentially spilled upstairs from a water softener, washer, dishwasher, is going to be there forever in the R60 insulated floor.
The water lines could stay below frost where they enter the house. Water heat tapes have a 10 year advertised lifespan but we install them and rely on them inside or near structures where they can't really be serviced.

Preserved wood foundations get a thick poly or liner material between the dirt and the wood. Any water that hits the poly gets directed down to a weeping tile. In my area it would be the bees knees because we are so well drained. Its warmer and cheaper than concrete.
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  #29  
Old 02-08-2019, 10:19 AM
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milomilo milomilo is offline
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A basement does eliminate a lot of issues. Cheap square footage too. With our basement the water enters at floor level so way below the frost line. We still open the kitchen lower cabinet doors every night to make sure room air gets in there.
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“Necessity is the plea for every infringement of human freedom. It is the argument of tyrants; it is the creed of slaves"

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  #30  
Old 02-08-2019, 10:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
Maybe you don't want to spend the effort, time or money, but have you considered putting it on a preserved wood basement? Here are my reasons for wishing I had a basement under my current house:
Furnace is noisy F$%^! and you can't close it in because the house doesn't have cold air returns. Turn the TV up to 100 when it kicks on. Would like to have the furnace or even just the fan downstairs.
Would like to have laundry downstairs and other utilities like water softener downstairs. Any water potentially spilled upstairs from a water softener, washer, dishwasher, is going to be there forever in the R60 insulated floor.
The water lines could stay below frost where they enter the house. Water heat tapes have a 10 year advertised lifespan but we install them and rely on them inside or near structures where they can't really be serviced.

Preserved wood foundations get a thick poly or liner material between the dirt and the wood. Any water that hits the poly gets directed down to a weeping tile. In my area it would be the bees knees because we are so well drained. Its warmer and cheaper than concrete.
In my experience in thawing pipes for people in Yellowknife, water that does get into the belly wrap does drain through the material. It is like a woven ground cloth, and once the fiberglas batt is wet it is useless until spring thaws it and then it will drip and dry.
I have not considered treated wood, I find it really expensive in our area, 3/4" around $38 a sheet. I just bought 3 sheets to do a trailer deck. But besides that I worked on a repair years back, for a trio of nuns who had the basement wall pushing in. The ground was stream deposit, gravel, small round rock to big rock.
I have clay, so it may not be an issue. But with a part of my shack sinking now, I am not wanting to take that risk for the future.

In the time we were inspecting the house that we bought, a period of 2 hrs with the outside at -30, the furnace never came on at all.
I'm going there today and I plan to force the furnace to go on, just to hear the noise, if any. You may note that the furnace is 56,000btu, less than 1/2 the size of my furnace in the house now, and about the same size as I use to heat the machine shop seacan. So I am thinking it may make less noise, don't know.
I have a furnace in my basement now, and it can be heard at any point in the house. The biggest noise is from the fan from the return air ducts, and that won't change in my case by having it in the basement.
I have considered a high efficiency Hydronic furnace, just to get rid of the noise and hopefully reduce the bills. But going deaf has it's benefits.

Kev, the way I make decisions of this sort is I look at past experience, and the present economics, and consider any improvements in technology, and try to strike a balance that I can live with and accommodate all the factors to consider.
So far I am waiting for the numbers from an ICF contractor. One of our premier builders in the area, who we contacted when we were planning to build, has flat out refused to build on ICF basements. So we ruled it out.
But I think they had a bad conc supplier, and bad contractor for the install. Done badly it has proved disastrous. Done right it is excellent.

I don't want a basement if I don't have to have one. If I live another 20 years, I will have an increasing need to not deal with stairs, and maybe need wheelchair access. This house can do it. One of the criteria we have is having room for a live in caretaker for us. This is just the reality of dealing with the end of lifespan issues. We are preparing now for the future, we enjoy our property and want to remain on it, and have no intent to suck on the taxpayer as we get older. I did not work and save all my life, to end up doing that.
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