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Old 01-28-2011, 04:13 AM
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Default Tractor loader refurb

Splitting out from my farm shop thread here: http://www.shopfloortalk.com/forums/...ad.php?t=26310

I figured I'd start a separate thread for the loader refurb.

The loader is a Steelfab unit, sold by ford dealers in the 60's and 70's and was fitted from everything from a 2000 to a 7600, ours is a late 70's 4600.

1) We brought it home in a trailer last weekend, and as I need the trailer again on Saturday I had to unload it this evening. With a lot of to and fro, and eventually once I got the trailer out from underneath it the engine crane came into play I eventually got it sitting on some trestles and resting on the ground.



2) Close up of the front end. This area needs some repairs, and some changes will be made along the way. The bucket rams need new rods and seals as the chrome is pitted, the crossmember and it's gussets are kinda rotten due to being a water trap and the whole thing needs some cleanup.

3) this is a rough chop of what I plan to do. The crossmember will be replaced with a length of 3 inch box, but I'll move it back up as far as the mounts for the bucket rams. I'll also shorten the ends of the loader arms as much as is reasonable. The combination of these changes will make the loader around a foot shorter. As I mentioned this loader is big enough to go on a 7600 (four cylinder turbo 100hp versus 3 cylinder 60hp) so shortening it a little will put it more in proportion with the machine it's mounted on. Ordinarily I couldnt do that as the bucket is of a design that fits between the loader arms. however the bucket is wrecked so I'm going to switch to a more modern style of mounting the bucket at the back. The fork that is with it (which is a bit rough, but usable) already mounts this way. it'll give me a bit more mechanical advantage (or realistically a bit less disadvantage) on a smaller tractor.

4) this is the bucket I've designed, I can get a friend to cut and fold it for handy enough money and I'll fab the brackets myself.
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Last edited by JohnBoy; 01-28-2011 at 10:43 AM.
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Old 01-28-2011, 08:26 AM
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(Farmer)JohnBoy....
I don't know what the old bucket looked like, but I would recommend
that you add a boxed in section, into the lower right side of
your bucket drawing.

Some commercial buckets have it, it forms a "torque tube"
Much better able to resist the twisting/racking forces when
one corner contacts the load.
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Old 01-28-2011, 09:48 AM
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Interesting, and makes lots of sense.

I plan on running a strip of two or three inch angle across the top edge too.

Would I be best to fold a 90 degree bend and weld in a diagonal piece, or to fold it the same way I'm planning and then weld on an angle piece at the back?

If I used 75mm angle then I could reduce the 150mm to 106mm and get a nice job with it.
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Last edited by JohnBoy; 01-28-2011 at 09:55 AM.
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Old 01-28-2011, 09:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnBoy View Post
Would I be best to fold a 90 degree bend and weld in a diagonal piece, or to fold it the same way I'm planning and then weld on an angle piece at the back?

If I used 75mm angle then I could reduce the 150mm to 106mm and get a nice job with it.

I have seen both ways, the first on a Ford backhoe (made somewhere
in your neck of the woods) formed a pocket that eventually rusted out.

I made mine, what you have drawn (before you edited it), then added a large angle (press braked
from the same material maybe 12" x 9" ) and put it on the outside.

I continous welded the top leg (keep water out), and stitch welded
the edge along the bottom, for a drain.

Let me convert your metric numbers for second (taking off shoes and socks
to count higher...)

75mm angle would be 3" leg ? I'd go at least 6" (150 mm), but a hot rolled section
would be way too heavy, hence have it bent from the same plate as the bucket,
maybe 3/16"-1/4" (5-6mm)

How much does the tractor weigh ? how much horsepower ? 2 wheel drive or 4x4 ?
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Old 01-28-2011, 10:10 AM
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Thats an interesting loader design.
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Old 01-28-2011, 10:42 AM
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tis an interesting way of doing it, but relatively simple compared to some of the bucket tilt contraptions that were tried out in the 70s.

It's a heavy setup just to tilt a feckin bucket it has to be said.


@doug, sorry about the metric, I really annoy cutter by swapping between the two all the time I do it all the time without thinking.

To get something like 12x9 I'd have to buy a whole extra sheet so a length of 3 inch angle (which I have lots) will probably have to do.


Sorry I never actually said in the first post what the tractor is. late 70s (still trying to get an age on it) ford 4600, 3 cylinder, 60hp, 2wd, around 2 tonnes.
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Old 01-28-2011, 11:02 AM
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John, got the same problem. All steel in Canada is in inch. Very near impossible to buy a metric drill bit here, or anything else metric...for a metric country we did a piss poor job of forcing it down our throats. Too bad. I can get metrics out of the US. Strangely.

Do you have steel termites in Ireland...looks like they made a home in the loader arms
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Old 01-28-2011, 11:28 AM
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Ireland is very mixed.

Most stuff is actually metric, but metric equivilants of imperial.

The weirdest is plasterboard. comes in 4foot by 2.4m sheets!!! or maybe the other way round actually, 1.2m by 8foot, cant remember.


steel termites, or maybe pirahnas, something to live in the water that was trapped in the bottom of it!
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Old 01-28-2011, 11:56 AM
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That 3" leg angle iron is a bit small,poke around and see what you can cobble
up, With that size tractor, I would like to see something (triangle wise)
that would contain 4"-5" dia.

If you spend all this time making a nice bucket, then first time out, catch
a root with one corner, and fold it all up, it'll be wasted. If you add a little
too much material (not to the point of being too heavy mind you)
all your building time will not be wasted, maybe just a couple of dollars
extra, for material.

Oh and make sure you weld a couple of chain grab hooks up top,
extremely handy.
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Old 01-28-2011, 01:16 PM
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Another huge advantage with that square back corner is in grading and smoothing, when you go to backdrag, it will cut off the high spots, whereas an angled or rolled corner will ride over most of them. Pretty much all the loader backhoes are square cornered on the backside for this reason now.

Also, plan on a strip down each side, along the leading edge, to act as both a cutting edge, and wear item. It also helps strengthen and reinforce the sides.
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