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  #11  
Old 01-30-2019, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by greywynd View Post
A Cinci with a CAT 40 holder compared to wolfie's mill drill is like comparing a ocean freighter to a rubber dinghy!!

I ran a #5 Cincinnati vertical at one shop years ago, with a 50 taper, and a 6" facemill, it was crazy the material that it would take off. We only used it on occasion, so we never really got proficient at running it. watching the chips fly was fun though!
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Originally Posted by greywynd View Post
to a rubber dinghy!!
Thanks for the giving it a bit more credit there graywynd, But I'm sure you do know a dingy can float...
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  #12  
Old 01-30-2019, 12:45 PM
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terry lingle terry lingle is offline
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Originally Posted by MetalWolf View Post
Thanks for the giving it a bit more credit there graywynd, But I'm sure you do know a dingy can float...
Wrong fu floats about as well as the Titanic after it danced with the iceberg
but it will remove metal if you are as patient as cutter.

As Greywind and others have said Each tooth in the cut requires some horsepower to remove a certain sized chip and each cutter works best with a specified chip load. ( feed rate plus depth of cut set this )
There are two requirements placed on the machine by these tool dependent requirements they are sufficient horsepower and adequate rigidity to work without destroying tooling and leaving an acceptable surface finish on the work.
If you are patient enough they work. If you value your time rong fu or any other smal light mill = wrong choice.
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  #13  
Old 01-30-2019, 01:05 PM
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Originally Posted by terry lingle View Post
Wrong fu floats about as well as the Titanic after it danced with the iceberg
but it will remove metal if you are as patient as cutter.

As Greywind and others have said Each tooth in the cut requires some horsepower to remove a certain sized chip and each cutter works best with a specified chip load. ( feed rate plus depth of cut set this )
There are two requirements placed on the machine by these tool dependent requirements they are sufficient horsepower and adequate rigidity to work without destroying tooling and leaving an acceptable surface finish on the work.
If you are patient enough they work. If you value your time rong fu or any other smal light mill = wrong choice.
No, I get it, and the choice was a bad one for what I want to do but till I fix my floor problem its what I have to deal with and I do appreciate the help and advice...
I was jokingly meaning he gave the mill drill a wee bit more credit because a dingy can float meaning the mill is a bit of an anchor...
you guys at the beginning of my machining tooling adventure have all been very helpful and pointed out the good the bad and the ugly like when I was buying things I didn't need or should come later etc... because I found my self with a few things I no doubt didn't need and without tooling I did need and didn't have
as you can see I haven't been buying blindly then asking after the fact but now I've developed a kind of gunshy sort of issue on buying anything for the most part when it comes to certain tooling without asking first now...
but the fly cutter as cutter said if it works for his Mildred it should work for mine as well but will only work as good as the operator here
So please don't feel I am not appreciative of the help and advice you guys give me it is one of the reasons I'm here and still here...
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  #14  
Old 01-30-2019, 02:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MetalWolf View Post
Ok for the Rung Fu mill drill, what would the best type of cutter for facing
using a basic fly cutter...

Or if using a carbide facing tool which one would be better and put less stress
on the small mill drill a 4, 6 or 8 flute cutter
and if you were going to buy one of the mentioned in this from the banger-good website and which one would you buy from lowest to lets say middle of the road to chose from off the BG site...
IIRC you have an RF30 or so.

Go with a 4 flute face mill about 3" diameter, cheaper replacing 4 inserts than 8 at a time, as others stated keeping up chip-load with more than 4 will be a waste.


get a cheap 5 piece fly cutter set there may be a time you want to open up a hole, a selection of diameters will help get into tight slots.

each size fly cutter will require a tool bit for its size slot, I don't recall if mine starts from 1/8" or 3/16" on up.
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  #15  
Old 01-30-2019, 02:47 PM
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Originally Posted by MetalWolf View Post
No, I get it, and the choice was a bad one for what I want to do but till I fix my floor problem its what I have to deal with and I do appreciate the help and advice...
I was jokingly meaning he gave the mill drill a wee bit more credit because a dingy can float meaning the mill is a bit of an anchor...
you guys at the beginning of my machining tooling adventure have all been very helpful and pointed out the good the bad and the ugly like when I was buying things I didn't need or should come later etc... because I found my self with a few things I no doubt didn't need and without tooling I did need and didn't have
as you can see I haven't been buying blindly then asking after the fact but now I've developed a kind of gunshy sort of issue on buying anything for the most part when it comes to certain tooling without asking first now...
but the fly cutter as cutter said if it works for his Mildred it should work for mine as well but will only work as good as the operator here
So please don't feel I am not appreciative of the help and advice you guys give me it is one of the reasons I'm here and still here...
Those little mills are not a terrible choice they are just limited
The problems start when you ask them for more power or rigidity than they have.
Since most of the tooling and almost all of the better tooling falls into that category and most light duty mill owners do not have the experience to make intelligent choices mistakes become the rule rather than the exception .
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  #16  
Old 01-30-2019, 07:51 PM
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I was not down playing any mill with my thread.. More of posting links to show you don;t have to run scared of tooling cost.. I also think running a horizontal Arbor with good cutters will probably be where I end up over the face mill for most things.. Found New USA cutters on Amazon Cheap..

Like this one for $65.00

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00GWI9762...v_ov_lig_dp_it
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  #17  
Old 03-25-2019, 10:18 PM
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MetalWolf MetalWolf is offline
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Default Old thread revival

I figured I'd bring this thread back instead of just making another.
Been picking up some end mills and other odds and ends some of which ill keep and others I may end up selling off or trading off...

I made a few orders price was rite more or less considering I don't really know how to buy high-end American stuff without paying for it but buying use and unwanted tooling the out with the old and in with the new CNC a lot of people are going to...

I thought these would be a fair use end mill for roughing in something then I could go back later for a better finish if I needed to.

plus I picked up a new set of edge finders from Shars tools, Also a couple of vise stops from another guy for the mill drill and drill presses.
and one little deal to help me get on center on the lathe...

I picked up some extra tool holders and some other things from SHars I'm pretty happy with...
But am waiting on A lot more stuff to replace some of the wrong stuff I bought a while back.

I think one of the rough in cutters might be bigger than I need but it came with the others goes from 3/8" to 3/4" But done and gone got my self bit by a bug... to do this

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  #18  
Old 03-26-2019, 08:10 AM
Lew Hartswick Lew Hartswick is offline
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Here is a handy addition to your lathe tooling . :-) That thing in the last pix is difficult to hold in position.
...lew...
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  #19  
Old 03-26-2019, 09:25 AM
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I usually eyeball to get close, then do the scale between the work and the tool pinch. If the scale is vertical, it’s pretty damn close to being on centre.


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  #20  
Old 03-26-2019, 12:30 PM
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terry lingle terry lingle is offline
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Now now lets not over complicate this. If I need dead nuts on center I just chuck up a piece of scrap and make a facing cut then adjust til it faces clean at the center with no tit or wipe.
All my common tooling is mounted in a holder set up and left in that holder
insert changes are dang close. If a cut is critical I use the pinch test before I start turning.
Unless your machine has zero play or movement the instant you start a cut the tool bit moves down a few thou.
That deflection changes with the power required to make the cut.
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