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Old 11-03-2011, 05:25 AM
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Default EMT Bender Question

Because of all the electrical installs/modifications we are, and will be doing, I was wondering if anyone here has used a Greenlee or other brand of EMT offset bender such as the Greenlee Little Kicker models 1810 or 1811 like the one in the below link.

Over the years I have gotten by using a regular EMT bender, but sometimes it is a pain to make an offset while up in the lift basket, especially if there is another person taking up room. I have seen these used and it looks like it may pay to get one if you have a lot of offsets, but I really don't know if it would be worth the $300.00 asking price. You still have to take the time to measure and mark for the offsets, so about the only advantage I see is if you are in a confined area and have several standard/common offsets to make. Am I missing any other advantages..................thanks.

http://www.toolup.com/greenlee_1811_...-12-rigid.aspx
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Old 11-03-2011, 06:12 AM
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Pat, I have seen a lot of conduit bent but have never seen one of those used on a job. They probably are useful in some situations. They look like a neat product but the electricians I know would probably think of them as extra weight to lug around and another thing to put away at the end of the day.
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Old 11-03-2011, 09:55 AM
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Don't know what a "lot" means to you as far as connectors,but these require a lot less hands on fumbling and since a connector is required anyway....the time savings might offset (no pun intended) the cost.... I know it's easier Not promoting the following supplier only using them as an example of the fittings themselves...the fittings may be cheaper from another supplier and come in many styles and configurations for different offsets. I've seen them in longer sweeps too.

http://www.garvinindustries.com/Elec...set-Connectors

The real plus side of those offset connectors is they can be swiveled to fit more easily than a piece of pre-bent conduit...eliminates a lot of cussing.

Last edited by mudbug; 11-03-2011 at 10:02 AM.
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Old 11-03-2011, 12:13 PM
bob_e95482 bob_e95482 is offline
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I do box offsets a lot. Make marks at 3", bend 10 degrees each, done.
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Old 11-03-2011, 12:37 PM
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Mudbug,

The outfit I work for figures that as long as we are there they have to pay us. So, if a project does not have too aggressive of a completion date, they will save money on materials. It is kind of wrong headed thinking on their part because with the number of bends required for this project, there are going to be a certain number of bending mistakes (mostly from measuring and calculating) which will waste time and material. Also, you still need a coupler at the box so they do not save hardly a thing by not using the offset and other types of connectors. I don't argue with the desk morons any more.

I am basically just curious about the offset bender because I know it would take an act of Congress to get the purchase of one approved. I guess I am just getting tired of seeing all the nice labor/time saving tools that the outside contractors have. Things will not change until we get a manager that has some actual maintenance experience, instead of one who used to be a news paper circulation boss, and will shine at the weekly budget meetings because he won't spend anything out of fear of not climbing the ladder fast enough.............it really is a joke.
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Old 11-03-2011, 12:44 PM
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LOL...Gotcha'

You obviously understand their thinking processes are flawed.... It would still be more cost effective for them to supply the correct fittings to accomplish the end result.... "The hurrier I go the behinder I get"
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Old 11-03-2011, 07:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat View Post
Things will not change until we get a manager that has some actual maintenance experience
When I worked as an electrician I was introduced to a kicker. It saves a ton of time and like you mentioned is great for close quarters.
I am now the maintenance manager at a medium sized factory. I hire out anything over 3/4" but still bend quite a bit of small stuff. First big 1/2" job I had planned I picked one up. None of my guys had ever seen one before I bet it has paid for itself just in mis-bends. If you are not bending pipe everyday its easy to put your offset on the wrong side If you get one make it idiot proof and mark it with inside/outside up/down or whatever makes sense to you.
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Old 11-03-2011, 10:42 PM
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We had one in maint.at the prison I worked at,it was nice to have but not used alot. If the job hade several offsets we'd take it out but for just a few the regular bender worked fine.

Aaron
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Old 11-03-2011, 11:42 PM
pturner pturner is offline
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I've got a little time on the 1/2" bender and lots of time and bends on the 3/4" one. I love it. I make $50/hr, and most of the time I'm traveling. My loaded labor rate (supervision, tools, training, benfits, travel time and expense) is well over $100/hr. So if it saves me 3 hrs, it's paid for. If I was training a electrcians helper who needs to be able to do offsets, and costs $15/hr, I'd probally hide this.

I'm not an electrician, I'm an engineer who does this from time to time. It's hard to bend perfect offsets without a lot of practice, and with the little kicker, I get them perfect every time. Another cool trick is to take a piece of hardwood, run it through a table saw until it is equal to the offset + radius of 3/4" EMT. This can be used to mark for a single hole, or even better for a whole series of holes.
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