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Old 08-08-2023, 09:30 AM
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CaddmannQ CaddmannQ is offline
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Default TIG Brazing the Unknown…

I’m looking for advice and suggestions before I make a mess.

My wife has this decorative astrolabe in the garden and it needs some repair to the steel portions from being knocked over. The pointer is made of brass or bronze rods & tubes, with a cast arrowhead and fletching.

There is also a spun brass sphere representing the earth.

The brass parts are all put together with little stainless screws and it’s not a solid assembly. I’m going to braze the yellow parts together with the TIG machine and some silicon bronze filler. Nothing I have to braze is thinner than ~3/32.

I have laid brass with an O/A torch before, but just on steel, and I have never done it with a TIG.

I could easily do this with lead solder and a propane torch, but I’m looking to expand my skills.
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Old 08-08-2023, 09:39 AM
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Here she is, ready to strip down and buff off all the corrosion. I will braze the brass pieces to the steel frame also, before painting the steel. I’ll put black paint on the frame and then clearcoat the polished brass.
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Old 08-08-2023, 11:18 AM
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It helps me to think of silicon bronze tig welding as hot glue. You do not want to melt the base materials. The challenge lies in getting the base materials hot enough to melt the filler wire and getting it to flow onto both pieces at the same time. It gets more challenging when you have vastly different thicknesses of base metals trying to join together.

It may help you to butter up a layer on the thinner piece first, before joining it to the thicker piece, whichever that one may be. And take into consideration how fast one material may transfer the heat away from your weld joint.

Brass will transfer the heat away faster than the steel.


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Old 03-05-2024, 10:22 AM
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Brian, I never did thank you for this advice. As it turns out the whole assembly was so stiff by the time I got it together that I had to press the pieces, and they needed no brazing after that.

It seems that I have still done no tig brazing, and I think the last time I did any was with an O/A torch over 10 years ago.

Eventually I plan to try this out on some old bicycle frames.
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