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  #11  
Old 12-08-2019, 07:40 AM
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allessence allessence is offline
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Originally Posted by greywynd View Post
Nice work Jen. And yes, a beautiful looking shop. Did it work as well as it looks?
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Its a museum quality shop. But it's a hobbiest shop.. Last time I was there they did not have any welding flux. Though they knew it was a welding demonstration.

So anytime I plan on going there I bring pretty much everything I need just to be prepared.

it is well equiped and well designed. Really just a wonderful shop.

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Originally Posted by Ironman View Post
Beautiful tool Jenifer. I am pleased to see this art and skill survive.
Thanks. Today the blacksmith scene is crazy and there are tons of people out there doing great work. everyday there is someone who is killing it that just started last week..

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Originally Posted by digr View Post
First class as always!

Ted

Thanks Ted. it's a decent piece and should make a decent video.

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Originally Posted by toprecycler View Post
Nice work. Looking at your modern makers mark, I figure you made the stamp yourself? Do you need to have the material you are stamping hot, or can you stamp it cold?

That is a cool looking shop.


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I do. they are all used Hot. I made my makers mark back in 1990 or 1989. It's lasted this long as a hot use. for cold work it needs to be a raised type and for hot work flat or incised type. Just easier to make and back then I had decent skill set but was about all I could come up with with the skills I had vs time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cutter View Post
Splendid looking chisel, Jennifer.
I would love to be able to watch that being done. Chisels are way under-rated in their usefulness these days, IMO. I used to carry a set, mostly of Marples, for mortising door hinges & strike plates. I could usually be done by the time others could get their router guides set up.

Hand work and good tools are still King/queen in my book. someone with skills can usualy do with hand tools what it takes another to do with a whole shop.

Thanks
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  #12  
Old 12-08-2019, 09:32 AM
Lew Hartswick Lew Hartswick is offline
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< someone with skills can usualy do with hand tools what it takes another to do with a whole shop. >
Yep! things like sharpening a hand saw or as Cutter said inletting hinges.
...lew...
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  #13  
Old 12-08-2019, 03:25 PM
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cutter cutter is offline

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Originally Posted by Lew Hartswick View Post
< someone with skills can usualy do with hand tools what it takes another to do with a whole shop. >
Yep! things like sharpening a hand saw or as Cutter said inletting hinges.
...lew...
You know, I should clarify that I don't mean to say that I was actually good at it. I was only barely competent to do a few basic tasks because of my usual dogged determination and because I had put in enough work to acquire a little bit of rudimentary honing skill. You'd probably be safe to bet that 90% of the chisels or hand plane blades sold in America over the last 20 years have never been honed to a useful edge. People buy them expecting them to be ready to use & wind up tossing them into a bucket or hanging them on the pegboard & forgetting about them.
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  #14  
Old 12-13-2019, 07:57 PM
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Cutter humbleness is sometimes a way to hide ones true ability.

I have come to the conclusion that everyone should not shun a natural ability or the ability to do a good job.

Somehow when someone does something better than someone else today they have to apologize for doing it better.

I'm not saying that it should be flaunted to insult or to make others feel badly..

but ideally it should to shown to inspire others to do, or want to do better.


I am not as good as smith as I used to be simply because my mind is not as sharp as it was 20 years ago and I can't see in dim light worth beans.

Much of it now is slower, and i am pickier today then 20 years ago.. I think this is because my skills are not as good so have to take the time to think about what I am doing..
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Jennifer

If I defend myself I am attacked.

My meaningless thoughts are showing me a meaningless world.

My attack thoughts are attacking my invulnerability.

I'd like to think of something smart, but I don't want to hurt myself.

My google+ page

DoALL 36"
Another Johnson model J Project
Lathe? Maybe..... 1958 SBL 13"
Yeti Esseti Aka running welder on 3phase.
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  #15  
Old 12-13-2019, 08:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by allessence View Post
Cutter humbleness is sometimes a way to hide ones true ability.



I have come to the conclusion that everyone should not shun a natural ability or the ability to do a good job.



Somehow when someone does something better than someone else today they have to apologize for doing it better.



I'm not saying that it should be flaunted to insult or to make others feel badly..



but ideally it should to shown to inspire others to do, or want to do better.





I am not as good as smith as I used to be simply because my mind is not as sharp as it was 20 years ago and I can't see in dim light worth beans.



Much of it now is slower, and i am pickier today then 20 years ago.. I think this is because my skills are not as good so have to take the time to think about what I am doing..


Jennifer, I think you are under selling yourself. Your skills might not be up the level you thought they were years ago, but that is probably just because they are a little dusty from not being used daily. I think there are few of us that could start doing something that we had done 10-15 or twenty years ago and do it with the same efficiency and skil level that we had back then. just takes some practice to get back in the swing of things. And with blacksmithing, literal a lot of muscles built back up to get in the “swing” of things.


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  #16  
Old 12-14-2019, 07:35 PM
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Dave Lee Dave Lee is offline
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Beautiful job, Jennifer as always. I can identify with "dusty." I hadn't used my mill for several years. One day, I needed to mill something and I felt like an apprentice, trying to remember, what to do next.

My Dad was an excellent carpenter and could make a chisel sing. Before he died, he bought a router. I think he only made a test cut with it.

There were at least three power tools like that, that he hardly used before he died. I've since worn out one but the other two are still going strong, 50 years later.

Dave
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Last edited by Dave Lee; 12-14-2019 at 07:44 PM.
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  #17  
Old 12-20-2019, 11:45 AM
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Very nice work on that chisel, Jenn.
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  #18  
Old 12-21-2019, 12:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by allessence View Post
Cutter humbleness is sometimes a way to hide ones true ability.

I have come to the conclusion that everyone should not shun a natural ability or the ability to do a good job.

Somehow when someone does something better than someone else today they have to apologize for doing it better.

I'm not saying that it should be flaunted to insult or to make others feel badly..

but ideally it should to shown to inspire others to do, or want to do better.
Well Jennifer, after a few days of deliberate deliberations , I have decided to clarify my statement.
When you deal with maybe 150 - 250 old rent houses as I did for as long as I did (more than 20 years) and most of them are either managed by, or owned outright by one man, and when that man is an admitted skinflint whose goal is to save every dime he can & still be able to present a livable product to a pool of marginally solvent renters, you have to reach some level of understanding with that man who signs the checks and who also collects the rent. David had a goal of being able to smoothly deliver the income to his clients with as reasonable a deduction for maintenance costs as possible.

He understood that I had to make a living but he would not long tolerate any appearance of gouging. And the lower the quality of the home in question, which almost always delivered a lower income, the more inclined he was to apply bandaids to open wounds so my job was often to do bandaid level repairs just to get by to the next tenant because those low rent houses attracted only low-rent mentality tenants. Those kinds of tenants were also of the mentality to do the most damage to the shitty old houses that were all they qualified to live in.

I dealt with fair share of kicked in door frames, dislocated strike plates and fragmented door trim. I replaced very few complete doors, comparatively speaking. I did a lot of patches, a lot of reinforcing and occasionally came back to my shop to whip out "custom" strike plates that were 8 inches to 18 inches long, long enough to cover the damage to the splintered jamb & bolts of a keyed deadbolt, keyless deadbolt and and entry lockset plus enough length to reach the still useful parts of the door frame. I would install those steel (usually about 11 gauge) strike plates using 3 1/2 inch screws to reach the studs and I never had one of them damaged over all those years. I didn't do tons of those kinds of repairs but enough of them that David saw and appreciated what they meant so he didn't ever beef about paying for them.

So when I speak of my marginal chisel skills, that's the kind of work I was thinking about, not some kind of wizardry secret door cabinetry. I did inlet quite a few residential hinges and locksets over the years but I never inlaid any decorative rosewood.

I did get a kick out of unrolling my bag of nicely honed planes & chisels and that little bit of skill I gradually acquired probably did distinguish my skillset a little bit from most of the other guys doing the same kind of work. Truth be told, I did not enjoy the typical woodworking jobs or hobbies very much by the time I was moving more into learning a little bit about metal work right here on these pages.

I did very much enjoy learning to use hand planes, cabinet scrapers and chisels. Living in this relatively "young", as in recently settled, part of the country made it a challenge to even acquire a decent set of planes. Power tools were replacing hand tools in the woodworking industry when Lubbock was still a puppy. There was simply not a hoard of fine old wood tools just waiting out here for me or the collector class of buyers to discover them because the town is too young. If I found any in stores they were considered & priced as "antiques", owned by dealers with zero knowledge of grade or intended use and priced from ignorance or frustration. I was one of the fairly early ebay buyers because of my search for actual user grade tools and I eventually had to overcome a mild case of addiction to buying them.

On her last visit here earlier this month my daughter got a quick briefing on the merits of 20 or 30 little planes & scrapers displayed in a bookcase in my living room. I was pleased to see that she "got it", or at least a smattering first step of appreciation. I honestly don't know how many (or where they all are stored) old planes & such tools in the house & shop combined.

Finally, and back to my humble level of skill, I am probably way ahead of the average power jockey hobby level woodworker in the use of hand tools but I would be an insult or an embarrassment to a real old time wood craftsman.
That's really not being humble. It's a fact.
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  #19  
Old 12-21-2019, 07:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cutter View Post
Well Jennifer, after a few days of deliberate deliberations , I have decided to clarify my statement.

When you deal with maybe 150 - 250 old rent houses as I did for as long as I did (more than 20 years) and most of them are either managed by, or owned outright by one man, and when that man is an admitted skinflint whose goal is to save every dime he can & still be able to present a livable product to a pool of marginally solvent renters, you have to reach some level of understanding with that man who signs the checks and who also collects the rent. David had a goal of being able to smoothly deliver the income to his clients with as reasonable a deduction for maintenance costs as possible.



He understood that I had to make a living but he would not long tolerate any appearance of gouging. And the lower the quality of the home in question, which almost always delivered a lower income, the more inclined he was to apply bandaids to open wounds so my job was often to do bandaid level repairs just to get by to the next tenant because those low rent houses attracted only low-rent mentality tenants. Those kinds of tenants were also of the mentality to do the most damage to the shitty old houses that were all they qualified to live in.



I dealt with fair share of kicked in door frames, dislocated strike plates and fragmented door trim. I replaced very few complete doors, comparatively speaking. I did a lot of patches, a lot of reinforcing and occasionally came back to my shop to whip out "custom" strike plates that were 8 inches to 18 inches long, long enough to cover the damage to the splintered jamb & bolts of a keyed deadbolt, keyless deadbolt and and entry lockset plus enough length to reach the still useful parts of the door frame. I would install those steel (usually about 11 gauge) strike plates using 3 1/2 inch screws to reach the studs and I never had one of them damaged over all those years. I didn't do tons of those kinds of repairs but enough of them that David saw and appreciated what they meant so he didn't ever beef about paying for them.



So when I speak of my marginal chisel skills, that's the kind of work I was thinking about, not some kind of wizardry secret door cabinetry. I did inlet quite a few residential hinges and locksets over the years but I never inlaid any decorative rosewood.



I did get a kick out of unrolling my bag of nicely honed planes & chisels and that little bit of skill I gradually acquired probably did distinguish my skillset a little bit from most of the other guys doing the same kind of work. Truth be told, I did not enjoy the typical woodworking jobs or hobbies very much by the time I was moving more into learning a little bit about metal work right here on these pages.



I did very much enjoy learning to use hand planes, cabinet scrapers and chisels. Living in this relatively "young", as in recently settled, part of the country made it a challenge to even acquire a decent set of planes. Power tools were replacing hand tools in the woodworking industry when Lubbock was still a puppy. There was simply not a hoard of fine old wood tools just waiting out here for me or the collector class of buyers to discover them because the town is too young. If I found any in stores they were considered & priced as "antiques", owned by dealers with zero knowledge of grade or intended use and priced from ignorance or frustration. I was one of the fairly early ebay buyers because of my search for actual user grade tools and I eventually had to overcome a mild case of addiction to buying them.



On her last visit here earlier this month my daughter got a quick briefing on the merits of 20 or 30 little planes & scrapers displayed in a bookcase in my living room. I was pleased to see that she "got it", or at least a smattering first step of appreciation. I honestly don't know how many (or where they all are stored) old planes & such tools in the house & shop combined.



Finally, and back to my humble level of skill, I am probably way ahead of the average power jockey hobby level woodworker in the use of hand tools but I would be an insult or an embarrassment to a real old time wood craftsman.

That's really not being humble. It's a fact.


Rod, thanks for the insight on renters. I have had some inkling that that is the thought process behind low rent situations. And here I have been thinking about maybe getting a couple rental houses, to help supplement my retirement income in twenty years. But done wrong, it would probably be the opposite. One thing I do know is, I can’t be the landlord. I need someone else to be the rent collector. I am just too nice for that.


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  #20  
Old 12-21-2019, 07:46 AM
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allessence allessence is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cutter View Post

On her last visit here earlier this month my daughter got a quick briefing on the merits of 20 or 30 little planes & scrapers displayed in a bookcase in my living room. I was pleased to see that she "got it", or at least a smattering first step of appreciation. I honestly don't know how many (or where they all are stored) old planes & such tools in the house & shop combined.

Finally, and back to my humble level of skill, I am probably way ahead of the average power jockey hobby level woodworker in the use of hand tools but I would be an insult or an embarrassment to a real old time wood craftsman.
That's really not being humble. It's a fact.
You're lucky enough to be able to share the info and what they represent to you.

Well you are in good company because I feel the same way about skill sets and the old-timers.. What today is thought of as special. Was just run of the millwork in the old days.. Ideally this has been what I have been chasing. it's just everyday work.. Nothing special at all.

in my adventures in blacksmithing and the journey being involved with all facets of metalworking has taken me to some pretty remote areas and chance encounters. I have met a few craftsmen over the years that to themself they are neither pro nor consider themself that good at working the tools they own.. On a few of these fellas, they were producing work on par or better than some of the top pros that were doing it daily. yet because they were loner types they had no idea the level of work they were indeed producing.. Nevery venturing more than to town and back.

To me, while I marvel at the end of a hand made table(traditional tools). It is what each tool does and the finish that it leaves that I admire the most. the finished item is ok (better than ok), but the skill set applied marvelous.

With this said.. I also apply this to someone's everyday work and the difference between a job well done, done, or just badly done..

I recently had to have a conversation with a millennial about doing a good job even when the work is not fun.. that taking pride in your work is why the job is being done vs just doing the job.. And ideally doing the best job with what you have to do vs how you feel you are treated at the job, or how you feel the job could be better based on what you want (which today seems to be fun)..

So, my point really was the ownership of a skill set.. it doesn't have to be at an expert level, It could be doing a layout on scrap paper. it could be using a chisel to cut a line that you see as perfect. It's all these little things that bring appreciation for the work being done.

I know that what I do while it may or may not be appreciated by others the only person I need to make happy on anything I do, is myself. If the work or one aspect of the work is all I can take away from it, then so be it. As I will do better next time. Or maybe I won't but will put that best attitude forwards.
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Jennifer

If I defend myself I am attacked.

My meaningless thoughts are showing me a meaningless world.

My attack thoughts are attacking my invulnerability.

I'd like to think of something smart, but I don't want to hurt myself.

My google+ page

DoALL 36"
Another Johnson model J Project
Lathe? Maybe..... 1958 SBL 13"
Yeti Esseti Aka running welder on 3phase.
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