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  #61  
Old 01-15-2020, 05:38 AM
MrCrankyface MrCrankyface is offline
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Managed to make some filler rod holders using the machine!
The thick white slab is machined in one go, terribly convinient.
I think total runtime was maybe 10 minutes, excluding tool swap time between drill and endmill.
The tubes are regular plumbing pipe, roughly 1.5" diameter.
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Also started hacking together a cover for the X motor, probably among my worst welds I have ever made.
Between the lack of gas and extremely thin sheet(23 thou), it was overall a horrible experience but I was impatient.
Some grinding and paint will fix it up.
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I started over on the doors, replacing the square tubing, painted the steel sheet and redesigned every plastic piece in one way or another..
Assembly is now smooth as butter and functions as it should.
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Here's the completed setup.
The doors rotate out and raise the windows at the hit of a switch whilst the middle window is on a hinge and manually operated.
I skipped the doors folding in half, simply wasn't worth the mechanical complexity that it caused.
I also simplified the middle window with just a hinge, which works out well as when it's folded down, it protects the control panel really well whilst still letting you operate the switches.
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Here's a short video earlier in the process, of one door opening and raising windows.
https://youtu.be/JJAiUSBVzYE
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  #62  
Old 01-16-2020, 04:41 AM
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GWIZ GWIZ is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrCrankyface View Post
Managed to make some filler rod holders using the machine!
The thick white slab is machined in one go, terribly convinient.
I think total runtime was maybe 10 minutes, excluding tool swap time between drill and endmill.
The tubes are regular plumbing pipe, roughly 1.5" diameter.
Nice, I assume the backlash was not a problem cutting circles with an endmill.
Back in the days it would take longer to program the part than machine time, setups took an average 4 hours, mounting fixtures and setting tools/cutters, dry run, inspection.
About 1985 the shop I worked at purchased a demo CNC at a machine show and a AppleII computer to make programs for the CNC that was a big deal back then.
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  #63  
Old 01-16-2020, 10:40 AM
MrCrankyface MrCrankyface is offline
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Tech has made some amazing steps forward, in affordability as well!
I sketched that part up in CAD and then generated the code, total time around 15 minutes.
Setup was basically just screwing it onto a sacrificial board as it was a simple part.
Granted I also take shortcuts and don't do dry-runs and so on.

The control software works pretty well for compensating the backlash!
The circles are definitely not perfect but very close!
When it changes direction it pauses a tiny bit and takes up the slack(which you have to measure and write into the software) before it starts feeding again.
As long as you take light cuts it works great!

I could easily plunge with a 20mm end mill into this material without problems but quickly noticed I need to be more careful with aluminium for example.
Table was moving in X but the milling forces also moved the table in Y due to my backlash.
Granted this was with the same 20mm end mill with full engagement and DOC of almost 8mm.
I changed the code to 50% engagement and made sure the forces would always push against the screw and it worked great!
Definitely need to think like it's a manual machine when programming the moves.

Here's the finished X-cover, not too pretty but it'll serve it's purpose.
I believe there was some silicone left on the sheet which caused the paint do ripple a bit.
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A bit better photo of the opening mechanism that I previously milled out.
Basically just a rack and pinion system.
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And I believe I posted earlier about what kind of cooling systems to use ... After using flood and air blast, I've realized it would also be incredibly convenient to have a fogbuster or similar.
When cutting aluminium with high engagement of the cutter it sticks like **** with no fluid but using flood feels way overkill and soaks everything within 4 square meter.
So here's my attempt at making the same old cooling unit do 3 functions.
3 different solenoids will control the 3 modes:
1. Air only
2. Air+small amount of liquid injected into airpath(Needle valve to control the liquid)
3. Large amount of liquid through flood nozzle
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Last edited by MrCrankyface; 01-16-2020 at 10:45 AM.
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  #64  
Old 01-19-2020, 02:25 PM
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Some day you will have to tell us the story of how you came to be named MrCrankyface.
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  #65  
Old 01-20-2020, 11:17 AM
MrCrankyface MrCrankyface is offline
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Long story short ...
I have what some may call 'resting bitch face' and being a typical swede, often seem quite careful/reserved in face-to-face situations.

This often makes people think I'm cranky, it was actually my fiancee who coined the term mrcrankyface a few years ago when I was trying to think of a good online nickname.

Probably further reinforced by how frustrated I can get during my projects, and how stubbornly I refuse to give up despite failing(and cursing) for hours.
Granted I've gotten a lot calmer about it with age.

As for progress, I started yesterday evening on the new coolant fluid distributor.
I was a bit limited by the solenoids which are 3/4" thread resulting in quite a big piece.
I did the notching in the mill with a little pocket cutting program, not so time efficient but perfect result and way less manual work.
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I of course did not have pipe in the proper dimension so a lot of it had to be lathed out from solid bar.
The pump will go onto the small tube, fill up the larger volume and then go out whichever solenoid is active.
One solenoid will go into the flood nozzle and the other will be activated along with the air for a lighter mist.
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Last edited by MrCrankyface; 01-20-2020 at 11:27 AM.
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  #66  
Old 01-28-2020, 07:40 AM
MrCrankyface MrCrankyface is offline
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After some more time with the lathe I finished off the new coolant distributor, nothing special I guess. Coolant in and 2 solenoids out.
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I finally went ahead and marked up the panel as well and added a small selector switch above the main control for coolant.
It will light up airblast/mist or flood depending on what it's set to, then you activate it with the bigger toggle switch.
Hopefully I can let the CNC activate this itself later on so the user only selects what kind of cooling to use depending on material.
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I've been letting it do some aluminium work and it's been a crazy amount of learning.
All tool paths has been generated by fusion360 and is hands down the most complex thing I have ever tried, although I'm sure it's absolute peanuts to people with the slightest bit of experience! :grin:
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I believe the piece came out quite nice overall despite the little mistakes here and there.
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It's going to be a light fixture after some more work on it.
These faces has had very different programs hence the different surfaces.
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I've already started looking into ball screws as the current screws are highly limited when it comes to rounded paths.
Vibrations and end mill rotation can sometimes cause it to wander into the backlash area and remove material where it shouldn't.
This requires you to run very conservative cuts to avoid it.
This isn't news just stating the obvious :grin:
However ball screw conversion has to wait as this project has taken up too much time from other things that need doing.

What's left to do currently is mostly wiring jobs and screw the panel back into place.
-"error" wire from the stepper drivers so the entire machine stops if any of the stepper drivers gives out.(Almost need to swap pants when one driver faults and the rest keep milling...)
-Wires to each home sensor(I realized it'd be quite convinient to be able to set a "machine home" automatically)
-Extra wire to VFD to make sure it goes into FWD mode. Currently I have to climb behind the mill to go from "neutral" to fwd.

But once this is done it should be a very capable machine even without the ball screws!
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  #67  
Old 01-29-2020, 04:45 AM
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GWIZ GWIZ is offline
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not much I can add you are doing good.

You will have to do your homework on ball screws
looks like they have two different nuts one with a large flange and a flange-less with threads, you may not have the room for a flange.
they may have a coarse thread pitch so you may loose some motor torque.

As for coolant maybe there is a way to engineer a hand pumped type squirt bottle for automatic pumping.
idea is not to mix air in with coolant so you don't fog up the room.
a pressurized tank apposed to a venturi.
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