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  #11  
Old 05-31-2013, 11:44 AM
BillR BillR is offline
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That's some nice work. I agree with 22-W, a day at your place would be time well spent.

Bill
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  #12  
Old 05-31-2013, 04:38 PM
troutback troutback is offline
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well,
i saw fish wheel and couldn't help but remember this....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KezvwARhBIc
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  #13  
Old 06-01-2013, 04:11 AM
FabberMcGee FabberMcGee is offline
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Okay Greg, here are all the trailer fabrication pictures I have. My last job was at a power plant and quite a bit of the time was just babysitting a pair of cold turbines. I had to be there to get one or both on line if dispatch needed them and there was a certain amount of daily maintenance to do, but on night shift if the company work was caught up it was unofficially authorized to work on your own projects a few hours a shift. I used that time to build the major assemblies for the trailer. Axles, left and right frame/deck sections and gooseneck parts. After hunting season of 09 I needed a trailer to haul my forklift and man basket to the coast and help my dad install more efficient windows. We spent about 3 days assembling assemblies and got it ready to use. For expediency we decided to let the gooseneck wait for another time and just use a piece of 4" x 1/4 box tube for a tongue and a pintle in the receiver hitch.

The last couple days we've been plundering the scrap yard. Let me tell you it pays to be friends with the guy that owns the scrap yard. Wait til you guys see what we found laying in the mud. Around there, iron is iron, the shape is of no consequence. Our price on anything ferrous is the same, if it's not something they have a need for in their operation.... it's free. Non-ferrous is a different story. I'll start a thread on this topic in a couple days when we get done.
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  #14  
Old 06-01-2013, 08:24 AM
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Scrapper Greg Scrapper Greg is offline
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Thanks for the pics!!! got my gears turning now!!! Can't wait to see the pics of the "find"!
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  #15  
Old 06-09-2013, 03:55 AM
FabberMcGee FabberMcGee is offline
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When I got home from the coast, I went back to work on the fishwheel. Actually on a way to move it 340 miles to the river and back. I didn't have time to build a trailer for it, so I made a tongue extension for my snowmobile trailer.

When my dad got back to town he (a retired carpenter) built a temporary framework of planks on edge to raise the floats up above the fenders. That made the fishwheel too high to launch in the shallow water which in the Copper River is the only place that isn't really roaring. They say the Copper is the fastest river in Alaska, I don't know if that's true, but it really moves.

So the plan we came up with was to jack the fishwheel up off the trailer and put it on stands while the trailer is pulled out from underneath. Then we strapped a pair of temporary wheels to the floats and clamped a lightweight tongue on the front deck.
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  #16  
Old 06-09-2013, 04:17 AM
FabberMcGee FabberMcGee is offline
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Here are photos of the launching gear in use. Also had to build a vertical push bar for the bow of my boat (built the boat too in '96) to move the fishwheel. The push bar hooks over the bow deck and is pulled down and back into place by a little binder. Takes about 10 seconds to install.
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  #17  
Old 06-09-2013, 05:30 AM
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Ahh HA! Now that I see the fish wheel, I can see how your trailer is going to work. I'm a little slow on the up take, but I got there eventually.


Got another couple of questions for you (not trailer related ) What kind of liscence do you have to have for the fish wheel? What kind of catch limits are there? Or is this for "scientific research" or something like that?
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  #18  
Old 06-09-2013, 12:40 PM
FabberMcGee FabberMcGee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by akabull View Post
Ahh HA! Now that I see the fish wheel, I can see how your trailer is going to work. I'm a little slow on the up take, but I got there eventually.


Got another couple of questions for you (not trailer related ) What kind of liscence do you have to have for the fish wheel? What kind of catch limits are there? Or is this for "scientific research" or something like that?
Chris, There is a subsistence fishery on that part of the Copper River that allows dip netting (a big handheld net like cleaning a swimming pool) or fishwheels. Department of Fish and Game issues a permit for the wheel and permits for users. That means my friends and relatives can use the same wheel. It is for residents only and no money may trade hands. It is strictly for Alaskans to feed their families. I can't sell the fish or rent the wheel. Catch limit for individuals is 30 fish and households are 60 fish, with additional permits for up to 200 or 500 available. Everyone I know of respects the fishery and only take what they can use. We won't take more than 50 or 60 fish so we can eat about one a week until next year. If we get that many, lots of variables. The fish have to be running when you're there, you have to have a good location, the river level can't be in flood stage (it is right now) and luck is a big factor. If the stars are correctly aligned and you hold your mouth right, the wheel might get a couple hundred a day or more. Usually that is not the case. When we were there last year, most of the wheels were taking 25 or 30 fish in 24 hours. The nice thing is, they will fish all night while you sleep.

The wheel turned out to be heavier than we expected and we haven't weighed it, but we figured total displacement for the floats at about 1600 pounds each if my memory is correct and they are less than 2/3 under water. So maybe it weighs about a ton.

The trailer frame is 4 x 4 x 1/8 box tube that we plated top and bottom with 1/4 inch. The bottom plate is 6" wide and the top has 5" in the center 20' (ripped from 1/4 x 10") and 1/4 by 4 to finish the ends. It is pretty darned rigid for a 30' span and we think it will do fine. We have some braces in mind for the ends, but we're waiting for the fishwheel to be on the trailer for final design.
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  #19  
Old 07-07-2013, 12:17 PM
FabberMcGee FabberMcGee is offline
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Been busy around here for the last month with a lot of things not really involving the shop. We said a final farewell to my brother, celebrated 97 birthdays for my dad and finally got the last of the well wishers out of town a few days ago. I'll try to get last years projects posted and finish this thread in the next couple days (since this year is more than 1/2 over already).

Looks like I stopped at the fishwheel. After that I had a couple weeks with no high priority projects on the list, so I finally got started on the leanin' wheel sidecar I've been wanting to build for 30 years.

During the summer of 1980 I was working in remote construction camps on the Arctic North Slope of Alaska (oil exploration). Doing off season maintenance (summertime, nothing moves off the gravel pads we were there to build unless the ground is frozen and covered with a cushion of snow) on a fleet of pickups scattered across several hundred miles of barren tundra. That was before the age of electronic communication, so any available magazine or book was read from cover to cover many times. I had a couple issues of Easy Riders magazine with me and inside one of them there was a picture of a bike turning left and carrying the wheel of it's sidecar about 3 feet in the air. The caption underneath was something about how you could lean left with a sidecar and go pretty fast, but right turns were a pain in the ass.... unless you had a very rare leanin' wheel sidecar. They said there were a couple companies in the early days of motorcycles that built them, but good luck finding one. Well, that planted the sliver of an idea that sort of oozed and festered along until last summer.

A few years ago I came across part of a carnival kiddy ride that I may have ridden in when I was 8 or 9 years old. There was a traveling carnival ride outfit that showed up here early in the summer and came back in August for the State Fair that had a ride consisting of surplus aircraft drop tanks with a hole cut in the top and a seat installed. This was the early 60's, so WWII had been over less than 20 years and there was a lot of surplus items around. Seems like there was 6 or 8 of them suspended from chains on a rotating frame. Centrifugal force would swing the little planes, or bombs, or whatever they were supposed to be out a few degrees and the kids would get to push a button and light up some lights and sound a little buzzer. Anyway, as soon as I saw this thing, I knew what it was and that it would make a really cool sidecar body. The owner didn't love it and was saving it for scrap, but when I told him about it and what I wanted it for he gave it to me.

Last year in the spring, my dog Zip was less than a year old and really enjoyed riding on the seat of my snowmobile with his front legs on my left arm and his head leaned out around the windshield in the wind. When summer showed up I started my bike to run it out of the garage and Zip jumped right up in my lap for a ride. We tried it for a 1/2 mile or so, but he's about 35 pounds and was too big and unruly for riding the bike the same way he rode the snowmobile. That moved the old sidecar project up to nearly the top of the priority list and I started actively accumulating parts and materials.

I put the word out among my friends that I needed a donor bike for rear it's suspension and wheel. One of the guys said "I know someone that has a yard full of junk bikes and 3 wheelers and he owes me some favors." 2 or 3 days later he showed up with some old 70's vintage Kawasaki enduro thing that had a bunch of the engine gone, a dog chewed seat and plenty of rust. It was unceremoniously dumped (kicked) off the back of his flatbed into a mud puddle in my yard where it lay for a few minutes while we studied it's possibilities. Eventually I stood it up and tried to push it out of the way, but one drum brake was rusted tight, so we had to pick up the front and carry it a few feet where it was again dumped on its side, this time in some grass and weeds. It lay there for a few weeks while I hunted for something I liked better. I chased a few dead end leads, seems like everyone with something I liked wanted money for it and of course, spending money on used parts and donors is strictly against the rules around here.

When I got the opportunity to start on the sidecar project, I still hadn't found anything else, so I took it apart and decided I actually did like some of what it had to offer. I used the front wheel with the rear brake and some of the rear swing arm. The shock came from the rear suspension of some undetermined model hot rod Ski-Doo snowmobile and the spring from an 87 Arctic Cat front suspension. The main frame is 1.5 inch tubing partly from a spare tire carrier off the back of a Bronco or Blazer and some other pieces that looked like a heavy tent frame or ??? I don't really know what. It seemed like pretty strong tube, at least not mild steel, so I figured it would work. I don't have a way to make small radius bends in that stuff, so I cut out the factory bends and used them. I did buy some new hiem joints off ebay. I got 5 each 3/4 joints for less than 20 bucks and free shipping.

I figured I needed to have the sidecar frame pivot as close to center line of the bike axles as possible to avoid having a bunch of weird geometry going on, so that took me several days of bracket building, but I finally came up with something that suited me.

There were lots of trial and error revisions before I got things to where they looked usable to me.
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  #20  
Old 07-07-2013, 12:26 PM
FabberMcGee FabberMcGee is offline
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I gotta get away from this computer and get to work, more tonight I hope.
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