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Old 02-09-2009, 08:05 PM
troutback troutback is offline
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Default logan 10" powr-kraft(monkey ward)

hi all,
just got a logan 10" x 30. have been wanting a metal lathe for years for an assortment of different projects. none of them engine or car related.

i have been actively trying to find one for a year. many a bid on ebay, many a pennysaver.....etc. i got a good antique book about lathe work a year ago and read it a couple of times. plus i have a wood lathe so the concept isn't too far away from the established knowledge base.

no issues to speak of with the unit. not bad for a 40 or 50 year old machine. i took it for a test run over the weekend. turned a little barbell for practice. i only have the old lantern style tool post and only modern bits so that made things a bit difficult, but fun nonetheless.

one of the oil-less bushings for the drive shaft connecting the motor to the main started smoking after a while. no biggie, i took off some of the belt tension and oiled again. still got hot, so i ordered new ones today. logan is still in business and have an almost full parts catalogue.

so now i'm looking at proper tool posts.

i do have questions though as i am new to machining.



first, what is the difference between sae 10 motor oil and machinist's oil? can
i substitue one for the other?



can i run an end mill bit on a lathe? high speed steel and carbide?
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Old 02-09-2009, 08:13 PM
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precisionworks precisionworks is offline
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Quote:
difference between sae 10 motor oil and machinist's oil?
SAE10, in a nondetergent oil, is OK for general lubrication. It's somewhat heavy for plain bearing headstocks, and a better oil is Mobil Velocite:

http://www.mobil.com/Canada-English/...l_Velocite.asp

I use Velocite 6 in the headstock bearings, and 10 in the other oiling points. Excellent mineral oil, not expensive, and a gallon lasts for years.

Quote:
can i run an end mill bit on a lathe?
If you buy or build a cross slide milling fixture, you can run a end mill in the chuck. Smaller lathes are OK for light milling in plastics, brass, aluminum, and mild steel (with shallow depth of cut & gentle feed).

Quote:
high speed steel and carbide?
I wouldn't touch that question with a 10' pole
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Old 02-09-2009, 09:07 PM
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Welcome TroutBack

You've come at the right time - Lathes are the project of the month.
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Old 02-09-2009, 09:20 PM
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I'm content looking at the pieces of mine in the box still


Tomorrow, tomorrow, tomorrow...



Welcome to SFT troutback
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Old 02-09-2009, 09:26 PM
troutback troutback is offline
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thanks precision works for the info.

i guess i should've clarified my last question.

in a small lathe(i guess mine would qualify) if i can run an end mill bit in it, should i be sticking to a high speed steel because of the lower speed or can i use a carbide? was that clear to you? i wasn't sure because your answer seems to indicate that the question might be one of those where one sticks his foot in a hornets nest. is that what i did?

and for the second part of that question....can an end mill bit be run in a drill press?

i need to basically cut a quarter out of some round stock(tapered) and i will need to make a sliding jig for the purpose. so with light cuts, i could either do it on the lathe or press. i'm just worried about the speed being high enough to work.

since speed is my concern, should i be looking for a particular bit?....2,3,4 flute? something else? i've got no practical knowledge about this just what i have discovered by endless googling....

anyway, thanks.
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Old 02-09-2009, 10:09 PM
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GWIZ GWIZ is offline
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You lost me somewhere.

end-mill,
Beginners should not use carbide. if you make the slightest mistake, carbide is real hard and will shatter like nothing.

Quote:
and for the second part of that question....can an end mill bit be run in a drill press?
yes, but its not a good idea for milling a slot.

Most drill chucks have a short tapered arbor that does not like side pressure from milling. the chuck may fall out.
Drill press tables like too bounce alot, that's another reason carbide should not be used.
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Old 02-09-2009, 10:34 PM
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GWIZ GWIZ is offline
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If you are cutting steel, and a beginner, I would suggest a 4 flute. its a bit harder too break.
1/4" HS end mill cutting steel. RPM about 700 -1000 rpm.
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Old 02-09-2009, 10:44 PM
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congratulations troutback on your lathe aquisition and welcome aboard.
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Old 02-09-2009, 10:58 PM
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Quote:
should i be sticking to high speed steel because of the lower speed or can i use a carbide?
HSS is less expensive, great for softer materials (no harder than mild steel), but you'll want to run it no more than about 100 SFPM.

Carbide is perfect in harder materials (stainless, chrome moly, etc) and will run twice as fast, around 200 SFPM.

I hate to discuss HSS vs Carbide, as it often gets into "mine is better than yours"

Quote:
can an end mill bit be run in a drill press?
No, they need the rigid set up of a milling machine. A lathe with a cross slide milling attachment simulates a milling machine.

http://littlemachineshop.com/product...ProductID=1681

Quote:
should i be looking for a particular bit?....2,3,4 flute?
4 flutes are common as dirt on eBay, and the cutting load (chipload per tooth) is evenly divided among the four cutting edges
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Old 02-09-2009, 11:54 PM
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Dangit...that could be useful someday.
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