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Old 02-10-2020, 12:42 AM
vyork vyork is offline
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Default Mig Welder Power Outlet

I just bought a Chinese DEKOPRO MIG Welder,140 AMP. The power chord has a NEMA 6-50P 3 prong welder plug but on the back of the panel it say its a 110 volt. Isn't the NEMA 6-50P plug for 220/240 volts? I called the distributor and they told me the welder is 110 volts and the plug was a 110 volt heavy duty american plug. Would it be okay to install an NEMA 6-50p outlet in my garage and wire it for 110 volts or should I do something else? Thanks!
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  #2  
Old 02-10-2020, 03:28 AM
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GWIZ GWIZ is offline
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What I see from your picture is at 110 volts it pulls somewhere around 37 to 28.6 AMPS.
If that is true. that would be the reason for a 50amp plug.

I don't know what is legal for 120 volts home, but if the specs are right you have to use wire, plug, and receptacle that can handle that high AMP rating.

The more I think about it
I think I mistakenly purchased a 120 volt 50 amp plug that looks like a 240 but is for 120 volts only.
it maybe they swap the large blade on the other side or the spacing that makes it "NOT" plug into a 240 volt receptacle.

IIRC
the NEMA 6-50P is 240 volts
the NEMA 5-50P is 120 volts .... "5"
https://www.parkworld.us/5-50p-p208.html
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Last edited by GWIZ; 02-10-2020 at 05:17 AM.
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Old 02-10-2020, 12:02 PM
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digger doug digger doug is offline
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...and there's no way that cord will handle that anyways.

should have bought one that is switchable to 240 vac.
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Old 02-10-2020, 12:12 PM
bigb bigb is offline
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Since the nameplate shows the I1eff value code would require that a dedicated circuit for that particular welding machine be rated at a minimum of 30 amps. If it didn't give the I1eff value you would be allowed to use the table in Article 630 which uses the 37 amp input and applies a multiplier according to the duty cycle of the machine which in most cases gives you an even lower required ampacity for the circuit conductors. But the code specifically forbids you to use the multiplier if the I1eff is given. Not sure why the manufacturer put a 6-50P on it other than a misunderstanding of Nema configurations and NEC requirements. I would change the plug to a Nema 5-30P which is rated at 30 amps 125 volts and for the wall receptacle match it with a Nema 5-30R, then run 10 gauge copper wire to a 1 pole 30 amp circuit breaker.

You could also run that machine off of a 30 amp RV hookup.
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Old 02-10-2020, 12:20 PM
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Shade Tree Welder Shade Tree Welder is offline
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I think your cord should be replaced, as Doug pointed out, I doubt it is big
enough to support the load safely from the picture, there wire gauge should
be stamped in outer covering.

I would get a piece of 8 AWG 3 conductor SO cord if you are going to keep
the cord length 8 feet or less, and 6 AWG SO if you are going longer. Also
the wiring to the outlet should be 6 AWG, protected with a 50 AMP fuse or
breaker.

The NEMA 5-50 would be an ideal plug/outlet for this machine. That is the
wrong plug on the machine currently for a 115V service, gotta love the
chinese...
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Old 02-10-2020, 12:28 PM
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digger doug digger doug is offline
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Honestly, it's only a 140 amp machine.
Lincoln (IIRC Miller too) makes a 140 amp plug in the wall lunchbox
machine, and it only needs a 20 amp 120 vac outlet.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Lincoln-...14-1/100670934
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Old 02-10-2020, 12:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
Honestly, it's only a 140 amp machine.
Lincoln (IIRC Miller too) makes a 140 amp plug in the wall lunchbox
machine, and it only needs a 20 amp 120 vac outlet.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Lincoln-...14-1/100670934
Well... I tend to be overkill, melting cords and mig guns leaves you thinking
overkill is good... I have done both, based on what NEMA says... Remember
a welder pulls a constant load, unlike motors. And I tend to run hot and fast.
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Old 02-10-2020, 12:56 PM
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digger doug digger doug is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder View Post
Well... I tend to be overkill, melting cords and mig guns leaves you thinking
overkill is good... I have done both, based on what NEMA says... Remember
a welder pulls a constant load, unlike motors. And I tend to run hot and fast.
Yes, I doo too.

However, I'll bet you can simply chop that plug off, and install a simple 120vac plug and run.

You'll have a 15 or 20 amp breaker protecting everything (at the panel)
and I'll lay money that that POS machine won't trip the breaker, ever.
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Old 02-10-2020, 01:23 PM
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A dedicated circuit is needed. I tend to agree with Ron...Overkill doesn't cost that much more...
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Old 02-10-2020, 01:55 PM
bigb bigb is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
...and there's no way that cord will handle that anyways.

should have bought one that is switchable to 240 vac.
With the duty cycle of most of these machines the machine would likely burn up long before that cord could even get hot. My Millermatic has an input rating of 47.5 amps and a 12 gauge cord. With a duty cycle of 30% at 130 welding amps the cord is not even close to overloaded.

I'd be curious to know the duty cycle of the OPs machine.
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