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Old 06-20-2008, 02:17 PM
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Yup, that is about the same results I have seen with straight fiber....not anywhere near good enough IMO. 1/2" wide cracks are considered a failure of the panel. Actually, wider than a US quarter on end is considered a failure. Fiber alone does not have the strength to hold panels together. It does have the strength to help the steel and prevent random cracking...just like it was made to do. We have done bank vaults with steel and steel fiber. Those suckers are extremely tough after they have cured. The steel fiber makes it 10x tougher than just plain rebar since it runs all throughout the mix. Steel fiber by itself wouldn't be that much of a challenge to break. You just have to use the stuff the way it was designed to be used for best results. Just can't get that through to some of these concrete guys.
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  #52  
Old 06-20-2008, 02:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by comp View Post
i helped on a CHEAP drive one time ,,they used chain link fence,,4" pour for trucks to drive on,,,,it cracked but stayed together

Chain link, chicken wire, hog and horse panels...you name it, it has been used. It is steel and will work well enough. Not the right way to do it, but you can't blame a guy for using what he has. It will still be way stronger than fiber alone.
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  #53  
Old 06-28-2008, 09:35 AM
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Surprise surprise I have another question. This is somewhat off topic of finishing, we can move it to a new thread if the great rulers deem it better.

What’s the main difference between grade 40 and grade 60 rebar? I’ve seen both specified for the same application. When would you use one over the other?
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  #54  
Old 06-28-2008, 07:28 PM
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I can't seem to find my ATSM book at the moment, but G-60 is the preferred grade and all I have ever used. I believe, but need to verify, the only difference would be tensile strength..? I only use 60 anyway. My enginers won't accept anything but G-60.
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  #55  
Old 06-28-2008, 07:30 PM
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could it also have to do with recycled steel ?
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  #56  
Old 06-28-2008, 09:29 PM
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Nope, I looked it up. The ASTM grades are reflective of tensile strength only. The 40 is a 40,000# nominal yeild and the 60 is a 60,000# yeild. Kinda like I figgered. Now, as to the makeup of the bar, steel composition, each bar grade can be one of about 6 different grades of material, but will still fall into its individual grade stamp rating. So, if it was a g60 with a rail steel suffix, it would still be 60,000 yeild...same if it was g40.
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Old 06-28-2008, 09:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DDA52 View Post
Nope, I looked it up. The ASTM grades are reflective of tensile strength only. The 40 is a 40,000# nominal yeild and the 60 is a 60,000# yeild. Kinda like I figgered. Now, as to the makeup of the bar, steel composition, each bar grade can be one of about 6 different grades of material, but will still fall into its individual grade stamp rating. So, if it was a g60 with a rail steel suffix, it would still be 60,000 yeild...same if it was g40.
cool thanks
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Old 12-02-2008, 04:21 PM
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I had a chance to visit Don this weekend. The concrete floor in his shop is in very good condition. Flat and very smooth. I will have to hire Don as a consultant on my next shop.. Not sure if I can afford his fees....
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  #59  
Old 12-02-2008, 07:10 PM
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I work for food, too.
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  #60  
Old 12-02-2008, 07:52 PM
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Don:

First time reading your post on this. I will take my hat off to you, concrete work is about the hardest work on a construction site. I've swung thousands of yards with a crane and worked with some that were good that it was a pleasure. Then others that would fight the bucket and make it hadr for the operator. All in all got it done without a mishap.

Very good documentation from your part. Setting in the crane seat I saw all that you just described in this forum. Keep up the good work.

Mailtrain- retired
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