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Old 04-20-2018, 09:10 AM
threepiece threepiece is offline
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Default Powetrain Hoist

Something let go on my J20 recently, I suspect it is the transfer case. I'm rather surprised as the drive train on these old Jeeps are over-built by today's standards.

I plan to remove the transmission and transfer case assembly as one. I guess with the PTO (power take off) and cross member it all weighs about 300 lbs. I did this job once as a young man, I question that I could do it now without help.

I did some load testing last night and I found more deflection than I like but I am unfamiliar with this little trailer hoist and am not sure how much load I was applying.
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Old 04-20-2018, 10:28 AM
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What did they put in those for a transfer case? Back in the late 70s and into the early 80s (when the "recreational" 4x4 craze was beginning) we did a lot of power-train work--all the domestic offerings and the CJs but I don't remember ever working on a Jeep PU.

I was also gonna mention that if you managed to get the truck turned upside down like that why not just undo the bolts and let gravity do the work--no need for a hoist...
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Old 04-20-2018, 11:00 AM
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This is better
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Old 04-20-2018, 11:42 AM
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Deflection isn't yield (yet )

It might deflect quite a bit, but still not deform, and collapse.

If you're unsure, put something under the tranny that will prevent it from falling more than a few inches if the lift does fail.

Angle iron is generally a poor choice for a beam, it's one of the weaker shapes out there. Tubing, or channel, is better. Probably tubing would best fit your use because it's more compact, and lighter for its given strength.
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Old 04-20-2018, 11:52 AM
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Hell, looked closer........it's a piece of channel (sorta?) on its flat side. Still the weakest orientation of that shape, but might be ok.

The killer might be the way you got the line running. Be nice if you had a pulley. Lotta friction there.

I hate working with what's on hand. I get all pissy about the design, then go ahead and make something suitable for lifting RR cars
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Old 04-20-2018, 12:38 PM
Farmersamm Farmersamm is offline
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Ran a quickie analysis.

Using a C3 channel (3", laying on its side flat)

At 500lbs it's a bit over 36K stress. That's getting over the yield point on A-36.

Might be why you're seeing a bit of deflection when test loading it.

These figures are for a static load.

Also consider how the deflection of the beam will kick out the side supports, and move the pads.

I'm a safety freak when I got shit over my head, so I might be a little anal about it. Don't get all bent out of shape. It's just my take on the situation.
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Old 04-20-2018, 12:41 PM
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Interesting thing when you look at the deflection.............it only reaches about .4 inches at the 37KSI limit. What this tells ya is.......ain't gonna deflect much before it yields.......not a lot of warning.
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Old 04-20-2018, 12:55 PM
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Even though your beam is peaked, I'd err on the safe side, and treat it as a simple beam.

It's like cambered beams.....everybody thinks their stronger. They ain't They just look better when they start to deflect.
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Old 04-20-2018, 04:02 PM
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Build a truss, then you are lightweight and strong.
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Old 04-20-2018, 04:11 PM
threepiece threepiece is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
What did they put in those for a transfer case? Back in the late 70s and into the early 80s (when the "recreational" 4x4 craze was beginning) we did a lot of power-train work--all the domestic offerings and the CJs but I don't remember ever working on a Jeep PU:
All Jeeps with manual transmission used the Dana 20 transfer case for a period of nearly 10 years or perhaps more. They stopped using it in 1980. Prior to 1974 Jeeps with automatics had the Dana 20 as well.
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Shit began hitting the fan in the 1950's https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nRnNDkHb0MU

A technologically advanced society would teach their children how to start a fire by rubbing two sticks together before teaching them how to use a lighter.

Aren't energy consumption and computers supposed to make life less stressful?

If you are not having fun then you are doing it wrong.
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