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Old 02-05-2014, 07:11 AM
Kelly Aitken Kelly Aitken is offline
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Default Tubing bender

I know this has probably been discussed to death but apparently, I don't know how to do a search because when I type in tubing bender, I seem to get everything but. So please read through another question.

I'm looking at the East Wood bender and the JD3. From everything I read, The JD3 is the way to go. It runs about $300 but doesn't come with any dies. The dies run $150 and up each. The East Wood runs about $450 and comes with 5 dies. I like the way the EW operates. I think I want the EW but my gut tells me to go with the JD3. I just hate the thought of laying out $150 every time I want to do something different plus I can get dies for sq. tubing if I want. I can see getting a grand tied up with the JD3 real quick. I'm just a hobby guy so it's hard to justify the JD3.

Any thoughts, opinions, or experience? Thanks.

Kelly
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Old 02-05-2014, 08:59 AM
Lew Hartswick Lew Hartswick is offline
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Not knowing anything about the two mentioned, does the Hosfield do the same thing? The one at school has several tubing dies and seems to do a
good job on the things they do there. I've only used it on flat stock.
...lew...
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  #3  
Old 02-05-2014, 09:42 AM
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mudbug mudbug is offline
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Considering your stated needs (hobby) The Eastwood comes with 5 dies for under $450... The JD will reach a $1000 QUICK

I've examined both a long time ago and you'll probably find the Eastwood unit will do what you need.

http://www.eastwood.com/professional...FXNp7AodvxEApg

There are numerous sources for plans to build your own ,but by the time you find materials & cut & fit things together and make or buy dies.... the Eastwood unit should have you building whatever it is you're actually going to build with far less aggravation & expense (unless you have access to free materials and a plasma table & a metal lathe & know how to operate them all yourself instead of having to pay someone to do any of the fabrication... )

Good Luck... You would think such a basic tool would have gone down in price ,but they still remain high $$$ The Eastwood unit being an acceptable price over most any other options I've seen.

A used Hossfeld (if you're real Lucky) would be a nice score because it's got more options (the dies are still HIGH) ,but that will depend on LUCK and location..... every time I find a deal on one it's across the country sold already..LOL
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Old 02-05-2014, 09:43 AM
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RED caddy RED caddy is offline
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From personal experience, the JD3 is more versitile than Eastwood/Speedway version. (or any of the "verticles") If you are allready familiar with the hossfield, the JD3 is a piece of cake to use. You can build or buy the hydraulic actuator later on, if you need it. I haven't put my back to the bar since I learned to step on the pedal...

You might consider a partnership or sharing arrangement with a local shop or hobby guy. I did that with a chassis shop, years ago. It worked out well for all concerned.

RED
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Old 02-05-2014, 09:44 AM
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I've used the JD3 to bend 1.75" DOM tubing for chassis work. It wasn't my tool, or my chassis, but the bender was pretty nice. It worked well, and the fella that owned it was very proud of his purchase. He had a hitch mount welded up for it, as well as added just about every die and bling accessory that fit what he needed.

If I had spare money, sure, I'd go that way. They're nice tools.

I havn't used the Eastwood, or even looked at it.
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Old 02-05-2014, 10:53 AM
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rmack898 rmack898 is offline
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I have a JD and also made a hitch mount for it. I use it mostly for bending
1-1/2" sch40 aluminum pipe and it works great.
The dies are pricey but there are a few die builders and I think I paid $70 for the last die set I bought.
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Old 02-05-2014, 10:26 PM
Kelly Aitken Kelly Aitken is offline
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Thanks for the input.The reality side of me tells me to buy the EW. I can store it away and drag it out when needed. My gut tells me to buy the JD3. I know it can do more over all but it will cost me. Also I will have to mount the JD3 some where and full time floor space in my garage is limited. I had thought about dropping 4 anchors in the floor and just putting bolts in them when not in use. I think the main hold back that I have with the EW is that it won't bend a 90* in the larger size tubing. It will only do up to 60* I really don't fore see needing a 180 bend. I'll keep pondering. Thanks.

Kelly
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Old 02-05-2014, 11:21 PM
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You need to core a hole in your floor, then weld up a socket for a 3-4" square tube, set it in concrete. Then mount your bender, grinders, etc on 4" posts.
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  #9  
Old 02-05-2014, 11:26 PM
Kelly Aitken Kelly Aitken is offline
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Mac, after further research, the EW does not come with a 1 1/4 die. The main project that I want to build is a hard tail section for my motorcycle. The tubing is 1 1/4. So I can buy a die for the JD3 but it runs close to 2-250 bucks. You say there are some die builders out there that can build them cheaper. Any links? Thanks.

Kelly
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  #10  
Old 02-06-2014, 06:58 PM
astroracer astroracer is offline
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I have a Pro-Tools 105 and am very happy with it.
https://www.pro-tools.com/
Yea, the dies are spendy either way you go but there is really no way around the cost. I bite the bullet every time a I buy a set but it's money well invested from how I look at it.
I also built a roll around bender stand for the tubing bender and my HF roller. makes for a nice compact package and either bender is usable anywhere in the shop.
Mark
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