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Old 09-04-2023, 07:34 PM
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Default Planning a 30x40 shop

Township regulations I can only build 30x40 18ft tall. I am in the early planning stages but I've had friends tell me I need pex coils for floor heating and drains for washing stuff. I have been reading through this section of thee forum, but I figured I'd ask in my own thread as there are a lot of dead end threads I've read. I can't say for sure I'll keep it updated but that is certainly the plan. I had thought of using an ibc for any water I may need, as I don't see a big need for water hot/cold other that to wash my hands. I don't plan on washing vehicles in the shop at all. I have an ancient waste oil heater I could put in use, but only plan on heating a small portion of the shop that has machine tools in it. I also have a stove or a nat gas heater, I believe it's a modine.

I just want a place that's out of the weather to work on whatever needs maintained and a place to store some crap on pallet racks. Many of the places I've visited/worked in are unheated with no water or drains and I do t believe I'd need that in my place.

What are your opinions?
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Old 09-04-2023, 08:38 PM
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if you have access to water, I would at least get running water to it.

I use an IBC tote at the farm just as you mentioned. I dont have power so I run a generator to run the well. The biggest issue with the tote is freezing weather. it cracks the valve and the tote is no longer usable. Fortunately for me I've got unlimited access to clean totes.
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Old 09-04-2023, 08:47 PM
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If you are going to heat it, use a heater that will run unattended. Whether natural gas, propane, electric, whatever.

Having a shop that isn’t heated 100% of the time, is the same as not having heat at all. Shit freezes and the headaches begin.

Having gone from occasional heat to full time heat in my garages/shops has been a totally different (and better!) game changer. No need to worry about what will and what won’t freeze and all of that.

Floor drains are only needed if you are creating a lot of water inside. House in town didn’t have one, wife’s car was dripping in it all winter. Made a mess but wasn’t the end of the world. A dehumidifier would have helped, but with dry air here it wasn’t a big deal.

Separate the work space from the storage space if you can. Dust and dirt from working doesn’t end up all over the stuff, and the clutter/stuff doesn’t end up in a working space.


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Old 09-04-2023, 09:51 PM
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Heat means a lot for me to be able to go to the shop anytime and go to work, I keep mine at 60 degrees. I would heat at least half of yours with floor heat with a gas fired boiler. And here a floor drain is a must. Depending on regs you might have to sneak one in. If you can afford it now is the time to plumb the entire slab and use zones to heat what you want until you heat the whole building because if you don't you will always regret it.IMHO I have no water running to mine but the boiler does just fine without it using a expansion tank.
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Old 10-10-2023, 10:20 PM
threepiece threepiece is offline
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There are different circumstances which influence the different opinions. I think a fellow should try to predict what activity will take place in the shop before he commits to a plan.

By far the biggest mistake I made in my shop was installing a floor drain. At the time I thought I would use it to wash cars and equipment but it has turned into a huge nuisance whenever I try to roll heavy objects near it. Moreover adding moisture inside the shop does not interest me, the water stays outside.

I don’t feel the need to continually heat my shop. It is fairly well insulated and the many tons of machinery, tooling and metal stock stores plenty of heat. Once everything is warm, it will stay above freezing for over one week even if outside temperatures are in the single digit Fahrenheit.
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Old 10-11-2023, 07:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by threepiece View Post
Once everything is warm, it will stay above freezing for over one week even if outside temperatures are in the single digit Fahrenheit.
It is funny that some people don't understand the Laws of Thermodynamics and have to be reminded. "CLOSE THE FUCKING DOOR!"
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Old 10-12-2023, 04:21 PM
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I spent the weekend at a buddys place and he just put up a 30x40. Man its small. He did only go high enough for his tacoma, as its just dry storage, I plan on going as high as possible.
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Old 10-12-2023, 06:26 PM
threepiece threepiece is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mccutter View Post
Laws of Thermodynamics "CLOSE THE FUCKING DOOR!"
Indeed, so you won’t let the cold air in. Hahaha
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  #9  
Old 12-28-2023, 06:46 PM
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So I may be purchasing a shop from USA buildings direct. Most of the places I've gotten quotes from has said steel prices are heading up in 2024, is that just a sales pitch or have I not been paying attention? ANyhoo, 30x40 for the shop with a 12x12 garage door in the gable end(both sides so I can pull through). The lean-to will be 12ft wide along the 40ft side so the over-all will be 40x42.

Not looking forward to the concrete bill either. I need it thick as the military wrecker I have pushes 33klbs.
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  #10  
Old 12-28-2023, 07:32 PM
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Default Planning a 30x40 shop

I’m sure the doors are in the middle or maybe you can spec them in placement.

I would make sure you have them at least 4’ from the side wall. When my dad and I built our 30x40 pole barn, we put in 10’ sliding doors. The opening started from one wall, and we had one on both ends so we could drive thru. I think I can count on one hand how many times I have actually been able to do that over 30 years.

One problem with our door placement was that really hinders storage / work space along the wall when I can pull a vehicle in. Things tend to collect along the walls, and I lost a lot of valuable storage space against the walls, while I try to keep door opening clear for moving stuff

Just a bit of feedback.


Be sure to plan some spots in the floor with steel plates for being able to weld something to floor for attaching a chain to. Never know when you need to straighten a truck frame, and being able to tie frame down to floor helps.

And some tube sockets, so you can have a vice on a post, or bender or other tools in certain areas, and then removable when not needed.

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