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Old 02-27-2016, 12:57 AM
threepiece threepiece is offline
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Default Starting Over, 28x40 Pole Barn

As I near the end of middle age I find myself compelled to build another "dream shop". I built my first one at the less than ripe age of 27. At that time I had no idea of what I would eventually get involved in. Now nearly thirty years later my dream shop is looking more like a nightmare.

I am starting here with a 28x40. This is not my dream shop but until I get around to building it it will have to do. The plan here is 28x40 with 10' walls and gambrel roof. I want second floor storage so it will have rafters with support beam under the upper floor.

I will be erecting this in a remote area more than two hundred miles away from where I live. Because of the limited amount of time I will be spending on site and the limited resources available there, I am forced to do as much processing of the building as possible in my current shop in the suburbs. I plan to prefabricate nearly all of the pieces as a mostly bolt together building and transport them to the site.

Here is a picture of the build site. There is a three to four feet rise in the forty feet length.
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  #2  
Old 02-27-2016, 01:37 AM
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Lu47Dan Lu47Dan is offline
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Hmmmm....
Bolt together........
I would avoid using bolts in a wood to wood connection. Nails work the best in that situation. Steel to wood, than bolts rule.
Getting the area you are going to build on flat is the first priority, then decide on the building method. I do not have a calculator handy but some rough scribbles says you have about 82 cubic yards of material to move to get the area flat. Give or take ten cubic yards.
A small generator, a small air compressor and a good framing nailer will really help you out.
Dan.
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Old 02-27-2016, 09:14 AM
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There is something to what you say about bolts, but I don't think there is a better way to fasten timbers and poles. Years back, my first, but not last building built as a timber frame....all timber framing is recommended to be fastened with oak dowels.
This is because as the building moves and flexes in the wind a bolt will enlarge the hole and loosen.

I needed to get this building up and I prefabbed and hauled it into the site. I drilled the holes and put in 3/4" bolts as i figured I could drill out and put in 1" dowel pins later. Later never came. A couple years after my timber frame house was up(with oak pins) I went around the shop checking bolts and found them all finger tight. So I tightened them up and figured that's good. So six months later, I checked again, and they were finger tight only. This time I assumed they had worn to a point and loosed and I wondered how bad is it going to get, and will this fall down? So I marked and checked faithfully for a year and a half, and they never budged from that point on. They seem to wear to a set point where the building can move as it wants and then that's all that happens.
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Old 02-28-2016, 07:25 AM
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Seeing as how grading and compacting for concrete is one of the few things I dont have a clue about in building a pole barn, I will keep an eye on this thread.

Then I will probably still pay for it, still not having a clue...
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Old 02-28-2016, 08:40 AM
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Well what type of building material are you using? Red iron, angle iron wood?

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Old 02-28-2016, 11:50 AM
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Build as big as you can afford and zoning (if you have it) will allow. Before you even finish it, it will be too small. My garage is 24x40, I added a 12 x18 shop out the back. I'm at the limit zoning will allow.
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Old 02-28-2016, 12:17 PM
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Congratulations, I look forward to seeing this project develop.

I have a question about the height. It seems fashionable to get a lift nowadays. Is 10" enough for a lift of your Jeep to full height?

The second thing is I when look at my shop which is a 3 car attached garage with about 10.5' ceilings, the floor layout has to be as a car house. I wonder what I would do with it as a dedicated shop space. One thing that strikes me is that it is a 3D space. I think for a dedicated shop I'd use some pallet racking and a pallet stacker. With the first level at 8' feet you can get all the normal floor space functionality. Using the stacker you get another large amount of space. Assuming, you door is in the 28' wall, you could put racks all around the the other three walls. So in a perfect world you could get 10 sections that would hold 20 4' pallets which is another 320' of 'floor space' or more if there are multiple levels.

In my case I'd put the wood working stuff up high. In your case it might be your Jeep resource stuff or your frame jig when not in use. High ceiling would be a bonus. I spend time moving crap (I meant good stuff) out of the way when I have to do something that require lots of space.

It will be interesting to see the stuff that you do as you've obviously thought about the project for a while.
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Old 02-28-2016, 07:46 PM
threepiece threepiece is offline
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Dan, (that's my name too) I never knew of any problem with bolting wood connections. I have used this method in the past without any issue that I am aware of. Perhaps I should inspect those connections again. In any case the bulk of the design work is done for this building with only minor details that I plan to develop as needed. I guess I will be making a habit of rechecking tension of the bolts as Ironman indicated.

I did get a little 2000 w Honda generator. It seems to have enough output to power anything I have although I have not yet tried my magnetic drill press. It was instrumental in building this 22' long cabin which is located about 100 feet from the pole barn build site. This was actually one of two storage trailers that I built a few years ago to hide some of my junk from the city. I disassembled it, loaded onto my 16 foot car trailer, and re assembled it at my new place last summer. It's not finished yet but it will give me a decent place to rest after a day's work.
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With the amount of energy that is being consumed I expect most people on earth should be living in Utopia. And now this?

It started hitting the fan in the 1950's https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nRnNDkHb0MU

A technologically advanced society would teach their children how to start a fire by rubbing two sticks together before teaching them how to use a lighter.

If you are not having fun then you are doing it wrong.
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  #9  
Old 02-29-2016, 10:30 AM
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Lu47Dan Lu47Dan is offline
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The problem with bolting is that as the wood dries out joints loosen up, and have to be tightened. Once the wood has dried down to it's minimum, then you have to deal with the wood compressing from the torque of the nuts and washers
Might be alright once everything is normalized, but you have to avoid over tightening the bolts. I made up plates for a friends equipment shed a few years back as his bolt heads were sunk into the wood.
If you are going to use bolts consider making a drilling jig and using plates on both sides of the joint. This spreads the force over a much larger area than just washers does.
Good luck. Dan.
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  #10  
Old 03-01-2016, 01:08 AM
threepiece threepiece is offline
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RancherBill, this building is not intended to be a work shop. It is actually smaller than the building I have here in the suburbs. I plan to build a real shop with a lift
some time later.

Dan, the bolt plates you recommend are already in my design and the jig for drilling the posts has already been made. I will show these when they are being used.

SmokinDodge, it will be made mostly from wood. Some of the support structure for the second floor and the footings will be steel. I did not know about red iron.

I found some 4" W beam at the scrap yard last Saturday. These will be used to make the footings. I also found a clean 55 gal. container. This will be used to transport water to the site.
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With the amount of energy that is being consumed I expect most people on earth should be living in Utopia. And now this?

It started hitting the fan in the 1950's https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nRnNDkHb0MU

A technologically advanced society would teach their children how to start a fire by rubbing two sticks together before teaching them how to use a lighter.

If you are not having fun then you are doing it wrong.
Reply With Quote
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