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  #11  
Old 03-04-2021, 09:00 AM
threepiece threepiece is offline
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Originally Posted by milomilo View Post
Just curious, would it be critical if the dimensions were off a 32nd or so?
Not at all, I am more concerned if the engineered products relate to size the way dimensional lumber does. As you may know dimensional lumber measures 1/2”-3/4” less than the stated size.
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  #12  
Old 03-04-2021, 09:13 AM
threepiece threepiece is offline
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Originally Posted by arizonian View Post
Page 3 of the Western BCI and VersaLam Specifier download shows actual dimensions. That's where I would start. I look at it as the same as going to a Ryerson steel catalog and finding out a W14x283 has a height of 16.74" and a width of 16.11", not the nominal 14" used in the description.
Yes, the Eastern Specifier that I looked at shows the same but I did not see the word “actual”.

Your reference to a W14x283 had me thinking you made a error in typing as a 283 lb. 14” beam seems ridiculously huge. Imagine my surprise when I discovered a W14x730!!! I have spent a fair amount of time looking at listing specs in my Ryerson, I don’t recall anything like this.
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With the amount of energy that is being consumed I expect most people on earth should be living in Utopia. And now this?

It started hitting the fan in the 1950's https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nRnNDkHb0MU

A technologically advanced society would teach their children how to start a fire by rubbing two sticks together before teaching them how to use a lighter.

If you are not having fun then you are doing it wrong.
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  #13  
Old 03-04-2021, 09:31 AM
threepiece threepiece is offline
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Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
I suspect the Op is building some welded steel sockets to hold the wood I-joist's
Yes, something like that. I am still not committed to using wood, I may use steel in some form.
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With the amount of energy that is being consumed I expect most people on earth should be living in Utopia. And now this?

It started hitting the fan in the 1950's https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nRnNDkHb0MU

A technologically advanced society would teach their children how to start a fire by rubbing two sticks together before teaching them how to use a lighter.

If you are not having fun then you are doing it wrong.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-04-2021, 08:12 PM
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arizonian arizonian is offline
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Originally Posted by threepiece View Post
Yes, the Eastern Specifier that I looked at shows the same but I did not see the word “actual”.

Your reference to a W14x283 had me thinking you made a error in typing as a 283 lb. 14” beam seems ridiculously huge. Imagine my surprise when I discovered a W14x730!!! I have spent a fair amount of time looking at listing specs in my Ryerson, I don’t recall anything like this.
My Ryerson catalog does not say actual, but it does have a section in the appendix for allowable tolerances. If a manufacturer shows a dimension in a catalog, I will take that as gospel WRT tolerances.

Hours and hours of welding 4" baseplates to W14x283 columns. Not very often would you find them used horizontally as a beam, does not make sense material wise, but as a column they are specified quite often. Buckling is not your freind.
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  #15  
Old 03-06-2021, 08:34 PM
threepiece threepiece is offline
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Originally Posted by arizonian View Post
If a manufacturer shows a dimension in a catalog, I will take that as gospel WRT tolerances.

Hours and hours of welding 4" baseplates to W14x283 columns.
Yes, I think the same about dimensions in a catalog but I thought to check with others to boost my confidence. I guess no one here has used LVL.

Below is a picture of pages from my Ryerson stock book. It shows the largest W14 at 99 lbs. The heaviest is a W10 at 112 lbs. The larger ones I found listed on an internet sight. I suppose the others are not available to common folks.
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With the amount of energy that is being consumed I expect most people on earth should be living in Utopia. And now this?

It started hitting the fan in the 1950's https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nRnNDkHb0MU

A technologically advanced society would teach their children how to start a fire by rubbing two sticks together before teaching them how to use a lighter.

If you are not having fun then you are doing it wrong.
Reply With Quote
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