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Old 05-11-2020, 09:41 PM
JBFab JBFab is offline
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Default Idea for a shop hoist

Since working on the smoker project as well as a couple of others over the last few weeks, I've come to desire a better way to move heavy shit around. A gantry crane would be the cat's ass, but I only have 8' ceilings, and a gantry beam plus the amount of space eaten up by the hoist, rigging, etc. would make it nearly useless. I should also note that a taller shop is NOT in the 5 year plan (unfortunately).

I first had an idea to add an electric hoist and a couple of sheaves to my engine crane, but thought better of it since it seems to have taken on a bit of a lean, and has seen it's better days.

My latest idea is to build a new hoist of the same basic design as an engine hoist, except more substantial. I don't want it to get ridiculously heavier, but I am thinking a lattice boom with a tube steel fly. Keep a long ram for raising the boom (except upgrade to an air/hydraulic) and add the winch I spoke about. I know that I want to make the pivot points wider and more stable.

Has anyone done anything like this? What are your thoughts? What do you guys and gals use for moving things around the shop?
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Old 05-11-2020, 09:51 PM
JBFab JBFab is offline
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Talking about it forced me into sketching something out...Click image for larger version

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Last edited by GWIZ; 05-12-2020 at 01:46 AM. Reason: Upload pic to SFT
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Old 05-11-2020, 11:23 PM
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greywynd greywynd is offline
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What’s the rating on the current hoist?

I know my current hoist is a one ton, seriously debated about upgrading to a two ton recently when someone offered to buy mine....the offer wasn’t serious enough in the end for it to happen.


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Old 05-12-2020, 06:03 AM
JBFab JBFab is offline
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2 ton fully retracted, 1/2 ton fully extended. I almost always use it fully extended.
Quote:
Originally Posted by greywynd View Post
What’s the rating on the current hoist?

I know my current hoist is a one ton, seriously debated about upgrading to a two ton recently when someone offered to buy mine....the offer wasn’t serious enough in the end for it to happen.


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Old 05-12-2020, 06:16 AM
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I think the winch idea is a great addition. You have a good prototype already to copy, and just upsize what you want to. Will you have all swivel castors?

The bigger you go in these, the easier it will to be to move around.




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Old 05-12-2020, 07:02 AM
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I wouldn't think you would need a lattice boom, a bridged rectangle tube would be fine
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Old 05-12-2020, 09:25 AM
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Quote:
a bridged rectangle tube would be fine
Agreed.

I love using my engine hoists around the place on slabs. Problem is, those darn feet. Never in the right place to straddle anything. sigh
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Old 05-12-2020, 10:11 AM
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I've been considering this for a long time. Some thoughts:
Fold down and break down cranes are rickety and should be welded solid. If it leans, first pull it straight with a come along.
The extended feet are always in the way unless you are pulling an engine or straddling the lift. Forklifts have a counter balance and shop cranes could adapt.
My unit has extendable outriggers and I could make longer ones but it's still sort of a tricycle.

I know I address an existing crane. I think the original crane you have will yield a lot of parts to get started.

You are limited to the capacity of the winch unless you lift directly from the boom.

What do I currently use? I have a small crane that sits on a trailer hitch mounted frame. I back the truck into the garage and off load or move that which I can't otherwise move. But, I'm not trying to move a Bridgeport.
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Old 05-12-2020, 10:29 AM
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https://www.harborfreight.com/2-ton-...ane-69514.html

I have had one of these for 20ish years, replaced the casters once, it is stored
outside. And just replaced the cylinder last year. I have move both machine
tools with it both are just under 2 tons and moved a lot of weldments with it
over the years. You can modify it with you winch if you want but honestly I
don't think you need it.
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Old 05-12-2020, 11:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder View Post
https://www.harborfreight.com/2-ton-...ane-69514.html



I have had one of these for 20ish years, replaced the casters once, it is stored

outside. And just replaced the cylinder last year. I have move both machine

tools with it both are just under 2 tons and moved a lot of weldments with it

over the years. You can modify it with you winch if you want but honestly I

don't think you need it.


I think this is what he has currently.

I can see the winch being a definite improvement, although like Ron says, not needed. But helpful in certain situations for sure.

I’m sure you know this already, but make sure any tables or carts you have do not have a shelve or brace lower than what the legs can roll under.

Now that I am thinking about this, I think I might redo my 6’x 12’ x 1” welding table in my shop. The lower braces are only about 3” off the ground, so none of my die carts lifts or motor crane will roll under it, and the top angle support frame is only about 2” in from the edge, so it stinks for clamping on the edge. It also seems like there is a bow in the plate to, probably from the makers over welding it. ( I didn’t make it, my dad bought it for scrap price 25 years ago) Give me a good excuse to clean up the piles of bird shit welds on it from the goons that would burn off the end of the mig wire on the legs and table top support.


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