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  #21  
Old 05-23-2020, 10:32 AM
Folkpunk Folkpunk is offline
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Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder View Post
Yep. I'd like a Miller but can't afford the extra 1k. Until then this will due (edit: for learning).

Last edited by Folkpunk; 05-23-2020 at 10:38 AM.
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  #22  
Old 05-23-2020, 10:37 AM
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Keep in mind hot short materials (like many grades of aluminum) cannot be autogenously welded. A filler rod of the proper alloy is required on those materials to prevent cracking.
Good to know. I associate TIG with thinner metals. Am I wrong to assume this?
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  #23  
Old 05-23-2020, 10:41 AM
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Originally Posted by JBFab View Post
Keep in mind hot short materials (like many grades of aluminum) cannot be autogenously welded. A filler rod of the proper alloy is required on those materials to prevent cracking.

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I have only been able to do it with 316 stainless. But you still have to have enough material to fill any gaps.
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  #24  
Old 05-23-2020, 10:53 AM
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That seems to be the theme among DIYers, but it is not limited, it can be scaled. It becomes quite Inefficient the bigger you go, however it is very precise in the hands of a skilled operator.
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Good to know. I associate TIG with thinner metals. Am I wrong to assume this?
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  #25  
Old 05-23-2020, 11:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder View Post
I have only been able to do it with 316 stainless. But you still have to have enough material to fill any gaps.
It really depends on the amount of allowing elements. Most steels that we consider weldable don't have a problem since we have pretty decent control in the mills nowadays. As you alluded to - joint configuration is everything. If it's not a near perfect joint you're going to need to add filler. Autogenous welding typically is only done on butt joints or corner joints. I know you know all this Ron, just posting for the benefit of the OP.

Here's a short article that does a decent job of explaining hot cracking with few words.

https://www.thefabricator.com/thewel...e-to-hot-short

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  #26  
Old 05-23-2020, 11:26 AM
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It can be used for different things. When I was doing mould repair work, we would use tig to put small beads on corners or fill holes in large parts, sometimes 5-10 tons in weight. There was a lot of careful preheating and post heat treatment involved.


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  #27  
Old 05-23-2020, 11:43 AM
Folkpunk Folkpunk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBFab View Post
It really depends on the amount of allowing elements. Most steels that we consider weldable don't have a problem since we have pretty decent control in the mills nowadays. As you alluded to - joint configuration is everything. If it's not a near perfect joint you're going to need to add filler. Autogenous welding typically is only done on butt joints or corner joints. I know you know all this Ron, just posting for the benefit of the OP.

Here's a short article that does a decent job of explaining hot cracking with few words.
At the end of the article it mentions gas tungsten arc weld (GTAW) I assume the acronym is synonomous with TIG?

Is there a rule of thumb to discern what metal you are welding on? Its one thing to differentiate between steel and alloy by looking at it, but distinguishing between different alloys seems more difficult. How do you know?
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  #28  
Old 05-23-2020, 01:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Folkpunk View Post
Yep. I'd like a Miller but can't afford the extra 1k. Until then this will due (edit: for learning).
I understand we have a few pro welder here that run overseas units with good results.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Folkpunk View Post
Good to know. I associate TIG with thinner metals. Am I wrong to assume this?
Yes and no. The control you have at low end with amps allows thin metals to
be readily welded and TIG is commonly used for that, but really TIG allows
very high quality welds. So you see it used on thick sections as well in
Aerospace and nuclear weldments, and anywhere high quality welds are
needed.
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  #29  
Old 05-23-2020, 01:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Folkpunk View Post
At the end of the article it mentions gas tungsten arc weld (GTAW) I assume the acronym is synonomous with TIG?

Is there a rule of thumb to discern what metal you are welding on? Its one thing to differentiate between steel and alloy by looking at it, but distinguishing between different alloys seems more difficult. How do you know?
The current correct terms:

GTAW - Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, is used as not all gases used today are inert. Whereas TIG is Tungsten Inert Gas welding.

GMAW - Gas Metal Arc Welding, former MIG, again not all gases are inert.

SMAW - Shielded Metal Arc Welding or Stick welding.

I am sure some welding engineer got to rename them in his Master's thesis.
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  #30  
Old 05-23-2020, 04:49 PM
Folkpunk Folkpunk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder View Post
The current correct terms:

GTAW - Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, is used as not all gases used today are inert. Whereas TIG is Tungsten Inert Gas welding.
Thank you for clarifying.
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