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  #11  
Old 11-16-2018, 10:08 AM
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Originally Posted by OldRedFord View Post
The purchase is official now. Also have a boring head with it.
Good deal, Tim. And about the right size too.
I noted the 440 sticker. Usually a 440 3phase motor can be rewired to 208 3ph, and a VFD fed 220 single phase will make it happy.
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  #12  
Old 11-16-2018, 10:44 PM
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Yeah, the older Gorton 8-1/2D and 9-J mills had two speed motors on them. We got lucky on tow of them having 220V motors. One of them had a 440V motor, we had it rewired for220V, then moved the shop where we had 440v and had to rewire it again. Later moved the shop where we were back to 22ov. Tossed the old motor and bought a newer Baldor two speed motor to take it's place. This was long before VFD's and such. Looks like this one is dual voltage, lets hope. Ken
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  #13  
Old 11-17-2018, 10:40 PM
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The spindle motor is dual voltage.

The power feed for the table and spindle are both DC motors. So far I have not found a diagram to answer the question of how I can change the voltage into the rectifier from 440 to 240.
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  #14  
Old 11-17-2018, 11:24 PM
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Originally Posted by OldRedFord View Post
...So far I have not found a diagram to answer the question of how I can change the voltage into the rectifier from 440 to 240...
I'm not sure what you're asking. Dual voltage motors can be operated on more than one voltage by simply changing the connections on the input side of the motor. If you're asking how to change an input voltage the only way to do that is with a transformer. If the DC motors will run on dual voltages then changing wires at the terminals will do it. If you need a different input voltage you'll need a transformer...
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  #15  
Old 11-17-2018, 11:49 PM
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Normally the control system is fed by a transformer that is capable of being reconnected to any supply voltage that the mill can be operated from.

In the control box there should be a transformer with an input voltage setting terminal strip simply set the links to match the correct input voltage.
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  #16  
Old 11-18-2018, 11:41 AM
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In your 3rd picture of the controls it looks like a transformer for the mags and rectifier.
Find out what the output voltage of the xformer is. Probably 110V.

Mine was 110 and so I tossed the transformer and wired in a plug in it's place. I have one plug for 220V that feeds the vfd, and one plug for 110v to feed the control circuits.
In my case the motor and control circuit transformer was 600V and as the motor was clapped, I replaced it with a 440/208 motor wired for the low voltage.
If you look on the motor label it most likely has a high and low voltage wiring diagram on it to switch from one to the other.
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  #17  
Old 11-18-2018, 12:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Ironman View Post
In your 3rd picture of the controls it looks like a transformer for the mags and rectifier.
Find out what the output voltage of the xformer is. Probably 110V.

Mine was 110 and so I tossed the transformer and wired in a plug in it's place. I have one plug for 220V that feeds the vfd, and one plug for 110v to feed the control circuits.
In my case the motor and control circuit transformer was 600V and as the motor was clapped, I replaced it with a 440/208 motor wired for the low voltage.
If you look on the motor label it most likely has a high and low voltage wiring diagram on it to switch from one to the other.
Ummmm, as a statement of the obvious to all but neophytes, the wiring connection diagrams are sometimes on the inside of the connection box cover. They used to show alternate arrangements of jumper bars for high and low voltage connections ( star vs delta).
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  #18  
Old 11-18-2018, 01:26 PM
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Mine was 110 and so I tossed the transformer and wired in a plug in it's place. I have one plug for 220V that feeds the vfd, and one plug for 110v to feed the control circuits.

Scary method you have two separate circuits feeding power into that mill so you must disconnect two cords to remove power.

The correct way is a 4 wire plug and cord set as used on a range or dryer with the proper breaker in the supply panel.
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  #19  
Old 11-18-2018, 03:46 PM
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Here is a link to a manual that has a diagram for the DC power supply. Looks like it feeds in 115V from the transformer.

http://manuals.chudov.com/Gorton-Mas...nce-Manual.pdf

Ken
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  #20  
Old 11-19-2018, 12:07 AM
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Scary method you have two separate circuits feeding power into that mill so you must disconnect two cords to remove power.
Quite right, as they are side by side receptacles, that's what happens. When I was at your place with it I said I planned to do it that way. You saw no problem. Without the control circuit alive you cannot turn on the VFD so you have no other source of power on board.
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