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Old 09-10-2009, 10:36 PM
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Default Asme 9

Can someone give me some information. I have just done my plate codes in ANZS 1554, it's fairly time consuming and I heard that if you do ASME 9 6G it qualifies/ covers all positions, is this true or is it a thing some employers do?
With the Australian standards you have to do every position to be qualified for it, seems to me if I can do one position and get them all it's going to save a lot of time and prep.
Clive

Last edited by clive; 09-10-2009 at 10:37 PM. Reason: punctuation
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Old 09-11-2009, 07:22 AM
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6G qualifies you in all positions on pipe. I have had to run a horizontal and vertical plate test and 6G pipe for the requierments of an ASME shop I worked in.
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Old 09-12-2009, 01:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by journyman View Post
6G qualifies you in all positions on pipe. I have had to run a horizontal and vertical plate test and 6G pipe for the requierments of an ASME shop I worked in.
Thanks for that, it seems a practical approach. In the information I downloaded it also said that if a person continues to use the code they qualified for and there is no reason to question their performance the qualification would continue indefinately.
With our standards they are only for a 6 month period. My company (Education Dept) is reluctant to pay for my tests, so much so that I paid for the testing and the qualification is mine and if I were to change jobs it would still be valid unlike how the situation would be if they paid it. Now I have it renewed they have come up with some work that needs a coded welder. Funny about that.
As the work helps a friend out I am happy enough to do it.
Clive

Last edited by clive; 09-12-2009 at 02:01 AM. Reason: grammer
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Old 09-12-2009, 02:08 AM
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Journeyman,
I have just copied this
The advantage of ASME 9 is that its very workable and very comprehensive, if you have a question you will almost certainly find an answer somewhere in the code, which is more than can be said for its European equivalent EN ISO 15614-1 (formerly EN288-3).

The ASME code may at first glance appear complex and very legalistic but once you understand the basic rules they are very easy to apply in practice. Its main advantage is that it requires very few welding procedures unlike EN ISO 15614-1 which requires a ridiculous number if it is applied correctly.

The main advantages of ASME welding procedures are:-

• All joint types approve each other. i.e. A double sided weld approves a single sided weld and vice versa.
• No limits on diameter approval for pipe. A plate procedures can be used to weld any diameter of pipe
• Materials and welding consumables are listed in groups, unfortunately only American grades are included!
• Any butt weld will qualify all fillet weld sizes on any parent metal thickness.
• A welding procedure qualified in one position approves all positions unless impact tests are required then only a vertical up approves all positions.
• The code covers wide range of welding processes and applications such as hard facing, stud welding, brazing etc.

and it answers all my questions.
Clive
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Old 09-12-2009, 06:51 PM
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"ASME 9" is section 9 in the code I presume? Section 9 is pressure vessels so I am guessing that the items you posted relate to tanks. In the shops I have worked in, full penetration weld tests were used so they would qualify you for a back up strip or joggle joint welded from one side as well as full pen and back gouged welds. Qualification limits are on the material thickness, not diameter or size of the piece being fabricated. Material cross reference tables are available. Usually large suppliers have that information on promotional calendars and the like. That a procedure is qualified for all positions doesn't necessarily mean the company won't require the welder (operator) to test in various positions. The code is standard by which all American pressure vessels and power piping is manufactured and repaired to, I believe the Canadians use some or all of the ASME code or at least have adopted it to a large extent (what it is called though escapes me). The National board certifies the vessel IAW ASME compliance. It's a good workable system. The only way to transfer welding a cert. is to become a member of ASME and comply with the requirements. Very expensive for a small time shop. Check out B31-3(pressure pipe), AWS (structural) and API (pipelines) standards as well there maybe something in there that is of interest to you.
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