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Old 12-21-2017, 11:57 PM
Riverr1 Riverr1 is offline
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Default Question about welding cart\table.

This question may be more appropriate elsewhere but I'm using what I have permission and access to.

I work on cars and trucks in my own small, home shop. When it comes to welding, referring to myself as a hobbyist would be generous as my questions may indicate.

I have a Tweeco 211i invertor machine which is capable of TIG, MIG and stick welding. The machine is currently on a cumbersome cart that the shop just doesn't have the space for. I'm currently fabricating a 2' x 4' welding table which I would also like to use as the cart to recover some space. Are there any problems with using the table as a cart also? Internet searches about this have gone nowhere and I don't want to assume that not finding an answer to this equals "no problems with it." My primary concerns are with electrical issues. Does the machine and the work need to or have to be physically separated?

A second question I have is about the power. I've been running the machine on 220 although 110 is an option. For the 220 I use a single pole breaker. Would this set-up create any problems with the table\cart? Should I switch to a 3 pole breaker and use both legs of power because of a phase issue?

I'll appreciate any knowledge and experience anyone can share with me about my concerns. Thank you. River
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Old 12-22-2017, 12:14 AM
Samcord Samcord is offline
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If you are getting 220 with a single pole breaker, I think it means that you have a wire with 110 to ground that doesn't have any over current protection.

If I were you, I would turn off all the breakers, and check with a volt meter.

It is more likely that two single pole breakers are feeding your welder.
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Old 12-22-2017, 12:59 AM
Riverr1 Riverr1 is offline
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Samcord,

This is interesting and I've learned something. I should have called the breaker 2 pole. 2 space breaker but just one switch, Square D QO 230 CP which I've always called 1 pole because of the single switch. Thank you.
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Old 12-22-2017, 02:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Riverr1 View Post
Samcord,

This is interesting and I've learned something. I should have called the breaker 2 pole. 2 space breaker but just one switch, Square D QO 230 CP which I've always called 1 pole because of the single switch. Thank you.
The number of poles on a breaker refer to how many wires are switched when the breaker is thrown...
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Old 12-22-2017, 07:30 AM
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There shouldn't be any problems having the welder sit on the welding table. I would put it on a shelf underneath the work surface so it is protected somewhat from spatter and it doesn't waste room on your table top. If you are worried about it being isolated from the welding current, just sit the welder on a thin piece of plywood.

A 2 pole (2 space) breaker is all that is necessary for 220V single phase. You don't need to break the neutral/ground, just the hot wires. 3 space breakers are for 3 phase power.
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Old 12-22-2017, 09:47 AM
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Having the welder so close to the dirt and crap of grinding and welding and smoke would not be my choice, but not everyone can have a large shop so you must make choices.
I suggest you be religious about blowing the welder electrics clean as the cooling fan will suck in dirt.
The other thing is where do you put your tank if the weld box is under the table.
Read my post here at #7 and on. I have a remote tank with 50 ft of air hose and couplings, which I switch between welders as needed. Putting your tank off in a corner may be helpful to you.
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Old 12-22-2017, 10:05 AM
KevinF KevinF is offline
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I agree with Gerry. No immediate problem with having it there but its not a good environment for a sensitive inverter machine. I never direct grinder sparks anywhere near my welder and if I am doing more than a little grinding I roll it away.

I understand space is an issue but you might not want your welding table and cart together all the time. My welding table is across the shop from where I weld on vehicles. Wouldn't want to have to move the table over to the cars even if it was only 2x4.
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Old 12-22-2017, 10:15 AM
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If you haven’t made the table yet, how about designing a cart for the welder that fits under the table for storage. Then you can either choose to use where is, or you can roll it out to a better or more protected spot when needed.


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  #9  
Old 12-22-2017, 08:00 PM
Riverr1 Riverr1 is offline
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Thank you everyone. I feel more confident with my plans now.

I did consider the potential for damaging my machine because of proximity. I haven't settled on the solution yet but I will be taking measures to protect everything. I also planned on a plywood shelf under the working surface rather then put the machine on the table. I'll probably fabricate a cabinet under the table with a system for keeping the machine cool.

The tanks aren't a problem because they're small and will easily fit anywhere the machine fits. I don't remember the size but they are less than 24" in height. Putting the tanks in a stationary space and extending the hose is an interesting idea I need to ponder. I have 3 different tanks with different mixes but only 1 set of gauges. Making the swaps I need to make would be a lot less cumbersome if done somewhere other than under the table.

Putting the cart under the table I think won't work well. The table is something I will need to put away when not in use. When needed I'll have to pull out the cart and the table instead of just the table.

Thanks again everyone. I have some more thinking to do on this so I'm sure I'll be renewing this topic in the future.
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