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  #11  
Old 05-16-2017, 11:21 PM
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The sand method works good. You want dry sand, otherwise you make steam when you heat it. Never tried it cold. I just tack a piece of scrap on the ends, just needs to keep the sand from falling out.
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Old 05-16-2017, 11:50 PM
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Saw that on a "How it's made" episode for tubas
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  #13  
Old 05-17-2017, 05:39 AM
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I have used sand to bend pipe by heating many times but had never tried it before in a tube bender. I first dried the sand with oxy acetylene then poured it in the tube. The trick is to beat on the side of the pipe (we call it rapping the pipe) and it will pack down, then top up and rap it some more.
After it was packed solid I put it in thr bender and it went well to about 70-80 degree, then it just pulled the steel in half. The wall actually thinned and stretched before parting company.
I'll make a new roller following Keith's recommendations. The reason for the sizer rollers I made was I wanted a 180o bend that size for a project so that's buggered too. I found some plans for a bender similar to the Hossfeld so might end up doing that. Thanks for the comments
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  #14  
Old 05-17-2017, 09:31 AM
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I've also heard of filling tubes with water and freezing it before bending. No clue beyond that though!!

Two thumb typing on a phone, as I never have time to use a computer!
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  #15  
Old 05-17-2017, 03:47 PM
o7oBaseMetal o7oBaseMetal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cutter View Post

Do you pack the sand in wet or dry? And how do you cap plain tubing?
I've heard about doing this for years, never seen it done so I just imagine all kinds of ways to screw it up.
I would think you could just weld a chunk of flat metal to it just like a structural end cap if nothing else.
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  #16  
Old 05-17-2017, 03:49 PM
o7oBaseMetal o7oBaseMetal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greywynd View Post
I've also heard of filling tubes with water and freezing it before bending. No clue beyond that though!!

Two thumb typing on a phone, as I never have time to use a computer!
That sounds like a good way to burst the tube before it even gets to the bender.
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  #17  
Old 05-17-2017, 07:27 PM
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When flame bending with sand we always used wooden plugs banged into the pipe.
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  #18  
Old 05-17-2017, 11:05 PM
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I bent some square tubing many years ago. I used dry sand and bent it cold. It was only about 3/4" square and light gage. I packed a wad of paper towels in one end and used a piece of bar stock to ram the sand and then, rammed another wad of paper towel to plug the other end. It worked fine.

I saw a "How it's Made," on trombones, I think, and they froze the tubing with soapy water in it. It worked a treat.

There is a low melting temperature alloy called Cerrobend. It is melted and poured into tubing to solidify and fill the void to aid in bending. Just like the resin process mentioned earlier, You melt it out afterwards. I think the stuff is pricey, though but, it can be reused.


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