Shop Floor Talk  

Go Back   Shop Floor Talk > Welding and Metalworking Forums > Blacksmithing & Forming

SFT Search:   
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 10-11-2013, 11:22 AM
DozerDan DozerDan is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: NJ
Posts: 604
Send a message via AIM to DozerDan
Default

How big of one are you looking for?
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 10-11-2013, 11:38 AM
CEC's Avatar
CEC CEC is offline
Over the Top
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: S.E. Ga
Posts: 2,705
Default

I might be able to get some of the square railroad plates. I'll have to check with my connection.
__________________
"There is one advantage to having nothing, it never needs repair. " - Frank A. Clark -
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 10-11-2013, 05:46 PM
LittleBadger LittleBadger is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Northern New England
Posts: 26
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MetalMangler View Post
Sounds like you're doing a great job of making what you've got work! I look forward to seeing how it's going, and what you're making!

MM

P.S. I took a cursory look in my scrap pile and didn't find the plate near the top, so some digging will be necessary. I'll keep you in the loop.
Will do! on both counts. I'm going to try to post an image of working out the kinks old school style but my posting prowess might not be up to speed so we'll see what we end up with ;-) How far upstate are you? I'm in central VT and would love to see your shop some time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DozerDan View Post
How big of one are you looking for?
Right now, I'm completely flexible. Even if I don't end up using it for an anvil, it would be great to have on hand so do let me know if there's something that's taking up too much space for you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CEC View Post
I might be able to get some of the square railroad plates. I'll have to check with my connection.
That would be sweet! Please, keep me posted.

Drumroll please..... Here is my attempt to attach an image:

You've heard of the Paleo diet, well, here's the Paleo anvil (this one from the garden with a lily for ambiance :-) )....
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Photo Oct 11, 6 29 20 PM.jpg
Views:	68
Size:	99.8 KB
ID:	110162  
__________________
C'mon over to unruly-e.com for a dose of bumbling metal ignorance ;-)
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 10-11-2013, 07:43 PM
MetalMangler MetalMangler is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 42
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleBadger View Post
Will do! on both counts. I'm going to try to post an image of working out the kinks old school style but my posting prowess might not be up to speed so we'll see what we end up with ;-) How far upstate are you? I'm in central VT and would love to see your shop some time.
I'm outside of Albany, NY. Close to the Mass border... So a quick run up the border and I can be in VT, but that can still be a far cry from central VT.

You're more than welcome to stop by and see what I've got, but I'll warn you that it's more mess than shop at this point. I have recently done some cleaning and been able to do a couple of projects out there, but that's been more the exception than the norm. But hey! Things like this give me a kick in the butt to do more cleaning and put things back into shape!

MM
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 10-11-2013, 07:57 PM
MetalMangler MetalMangler is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 42
Default

I did grab a few pics of the various forges and my anvil and stand just to give you some ideas of the range of different means to the same end.

Pic 1 and 2 are of my rivetter's forge. You can see some fire-brick that I used to make a deeper fire at one point.

Pic 3 is of the crank blower that came with the Rivet forge. I put it onto my BBQ forge when I needed a blower when I wasn't around electricity.

Pic 4 is of the hand vacuum that I use when I do have electricity

Pic 5 is of my anvil on a "stump" I made by bolting some wood together.

MM
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Rivet Forge - 1.jpg
Views:	74
Size:	55.3 KB
ID:	110163   Click image for larger version

Name:	Rivet Forge - 2.jpg
Views:	76
Size:	44.3 KB
ID:	110164   Click image for larger version

Name:	Crank Blower.jpg
Views:	80
Size:	31.0 KB
ID:	110165   Click image for larger version

Name:	Vacuum Blower.jpg
Views:	76
Size:	55.0 KB
ID:	110166   Click image for larger version

Name:	Anvil and Homemade Stand.jpg
Views:	76
Size:	52.1 KB
ID:	110167  

Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 10-11-2013, 08:00 PM
MetalMangler MetalMangler is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 42
Default

And just a few more:

Pic 1 and 2 show my BBQ forge
Pic 3 is showing the exhaust tube and plumbing parts used to take the blower air to the bottom of the fire area
Pic 4 is hard to see, but basically a brake rotor bolted through the base of the grill area to prevent the fire from burning through.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	BBQ_Forge - 1.jpg
Views:	72
Size:	47.7 KB
ID:	110168   Click image for larger version

Name:	BBQ_Forge - 2.jpg
Views:	80
Size:	54.5 KB
ID:	110169   Click image for larger version

Name:	BBQ_Forge - Air Plumbing.jpg
Views:	76
Size:	42.4 KB
ID:	110170   Click image for larger version

Name:	Fire Base.jpg
Views:	73
Size:	74.6 KB
ID:	110171  
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 10-11-2013, 08:04 PM
allessence's Avatar
allessence allessence is offline
Gadget Girl
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: MA, 01543
Posts: 6,461
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleBadger View Post
I'm curious about the good technique for cold-steel-on-an-anvil that folks are bantering around. Is it just a function of location of the piece on the anvil? Based on the cold steel being less forgiving than hot? Rocks don't care where you beat on them and their natural curve makes for some great shaping, but with winter coming, I'm thinking indoors has it hands-down on shoveling out the rock fence.
Firstly, never hit a large piece of metal on a cold anvil.. In other words. if the anvil is outside and it's 20F out don't go out with a 6lbs hammer and start smacking on it. This will more than likely bust something off.. Heat it up some first. Ideally with a light bulb box on top of the anvil..


The hardy hole on the anvil is used for straightening bars since an anvil is not flat but convex in it's length from horn to tail.. It should be flat on both edges from horn to tail but smooth just the same..

Not a huge convex but just slight..

When you are straightening something if you hold it against the anvil face and hit it you are simply mashing it or cold forging it.. This is fine for cold working steel for springs and such but remember the anvil is a precision tool..

So you need a hole or dip to let the pressure from the hammer strike actually move the material without forging it.. This is why you do it over the hardy hole.. if you are straightening large sheets then a large tree stump works better than an anvil as it will deaden the impact of the hammer blow..
__________________
_________________
Jennifer

If I defend myself I am attacked.

My meaningless thoughts are showing me a meaningless world.

My attack thoughts are attacking my invulnerability.

I'd like to think of something smart, but I don't want to hurt myself.

My google+ page

DoALL 36"
Another Johnson model J Project
Lathe? Maybe..... 1958 SBL 13"
Yeti Esseti Aka running welder on 3phase.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 10-11-2013, 08:12 PM
allessence's Avatar
allessence allessence is offline
Gadget Girl
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: MA, 01543
Posts: 6,461
Default

On another note..

As for height of anvil.. it depends of the type of work.. general work the standing up straight and making a fist the knuckles will just touch the anvil..


if doing a lot of sledge hammer work you will want the anvil slightly lower since you want to be able to use all the hammers power and once you start using top tools the distance will get used up quick..

I prefer my anvil to be about 2-3" lower than my knuckles since this allows for me to stand and strike to the far side of the anvil more effectively when I'm forming balls and such on bars since the bar has to be held up at and angle and if the bar is placed on the anvil flat at knuckle height and then need to lift a 30lbs bar upwards 45-65Degrees you will tire quickly..

I usually have 3 anvils mounted.. The sledge anvil 330lbs mounted about 6" lower than knuckle, 175lbs general purpose main anvil mounted 2-3" lower than knuckle and then a 150 lbs mounted about knuckle or 1 inch higher..

Each anvil and mounting height works best for different stuff..

I used to make Gates, fireplace tools, hammers, sledges, tongs, hand railing, colonial hardware. etc etc..
__________________
_________________
Jennifer

If I defend myself I am attacked.

My meaningless thoughts are showing me a meaningless world.

My attack thoughts are attacking my invulnerability.

I'd like to think of something smart, but I don't want to hurt myself.

My google+ page

DoALL 36"
Another Johnson model J Project
Lathe? Maybe..... 1958 SBL 13"
Yeti Esseti Aka running welder on 3phase.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 10-12-2013, 07:28 AM
LittleBadger LittleBadger is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Northern New England
Posts: 26
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MetalMangler View Post
I did grab a few pics of the various forges and my anvil and stand just to give you some ideas of the range of different means to the same end.

MM
Many thanks! Those are a huge help in terms of thinking about ways to make both an anvil and forge work with what I have on hand (love the fire bricks too...). At this rate, it will be spring before I get a chance to think about a trek west ;-)
__________________
C'mon over to unruly-e.com for a dose of bumbling metal ignorance ;-)
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 10-12-2013, 07:35 AM
LittleBadger LittleBadger is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Northern New England
Posts: 26
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by allessence View Post
So you need a hole or dip to let the pressure from the hammer strike actually move the material without forging it..
Ah! That's why the rocks work well too. Thanks for the clarification. So much to learn!

Thank you also for the tips on the anvil heights. I'm having so much fun welding found pieces that it will be awhile before I graduate past the sledge and move into skilled hammer work.
__________________
C'mon over to unruly-e.com for a dose of bumbling metal ignorance ;-)
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Web Search:

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:48 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.