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Old 06-25-2013, 11:03 PM
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Default My Grafting Knife

One of my hobbies is I enjoy growing plants (right now it's trees). I had someone show me last year how to do a cleft graft (didn't have much luck with the cleft grafts I did last year). So this year I've did a few grafts on my own.

I tried my first tongue and whip graft this year. I grafted a cutting from my fathers pear tree back onto a seedling that I grew last year from seed out of a pear from the same tree.

I also grafted a cutting from my grandfather's Satsuma orange tree to a Trifoliate Orange rootstock.

I plan on doing more grafting so.... I made a grafting knife.
I didn't take any progress pictures so a finish picture will have to do.

The blade is cut from a 14" diamond cutoff blade that I retrieved out of a dumpster. I then annealed the blade so I could drill the pin holes and do the final shaping of the blade. Once I had the blade shaped and the edge close to sharp, I brought the blade back up to non-magnetized and quenched it in water. (I tried used motor oil for a quench on a test piece of material and wasn't satisfied with the hardness).

I then finished the blade with a lot of elbow grease, sandpaper, and file work. The cutting edge is only sharpened on one side to give a flat cut when you do the tongue and whip grafts. I also put what I call a hollow grind into the side with the bevel.

I had picked up a Harbor Freight 3" variable speed bench grinder that I used during some of the shaping. I ended up taking the buffer wheel off one side and hooking my cordless drill onto the arbor to get it to turn slow with enough torque to grind the hollow grind. The grinder didn't like to turn slow and grind the harden steel.

The handle is maple. I used 1/8" brass rod for the pins. I next epoxied the handle (scales) to the blade. The handle is then finished with boiled linseed oil.
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  #2  
Old 06-25-2013, 11:15 PM
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Good lookin knife should work well for you since you designed it the way you wanted it instead of one off the shelf.



Rick
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Old 06-25-2013, 11:28 PM
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Knife looks great. Do you have any pictures of the different grafts you have done?

We have a grafted pecan tree here about 15 years old that you can see the drastic change in bark about 12" up from the ground, very interesting stuff!

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Old 06-26-2013, 03:37 AM
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Excellent. I would like to see the grafts as well.
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Last edited by tnmike; 06-26-2013 at 04:47 PM.
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Old 06-26-2013, 06:49 AM
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Nice work on the knife.

When I was in junior high my dad got into grafting. He grafted apples onto pear trees, pears onto apple trees plums onto peach trees, and I don't recall what else. I remember telling about it in a science class and the teacher didn't believe me. Some classmates came over and saw the fruit growing on all the trees. It was odd picking plums off of a peach tree.

His grafting hobby ended when my mother found some grapes grafted onto her wall of rose bushes.
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Old 06-26-2013, 10:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CEC View Post
One of my hobbies is I enjoy growing plants (right now it's trees). I had someone show me last year how to do a cleft graft (didn't have much luck with the cleft grafts I did last year). So this year I've did a few grafts on my own.

I tried my first tongue and whip graft this year. I grafted a cutting from my fathers pear tree back onto a seedling that I grew last year from seed out of a pear from the same tree.

I also grafted a cutting from my grandfather's Satsuma orange tree to a Trifoliate Orange rootstock.

I plan on doing more grafting so.... I made a grafting knife.
I didn't take any progress pictures so a finish picture will have to do.

The blade is cut from a 14" diamond cutoff blade that I retrieved out of a dumpster. I then annealed the blade so I could drill the pin holes and do the final shaping of the blade. Once I had the blade shaped and the edge close to sharp, I brought the blade back up to non-magnetized and quenched it in water. (I tried used motor oil for a quench on a test piece of material and wasn't satisfied with the hardness).

I then finished the blade with a lot of elbow grease, sandpaper, and file work. The cutting edge is only sharpened on one side to give a flat cut when you do the tongue and whip grafts. I also put what I call a hollow grind into the side with the bevel.

I had picked up a Harbor Freight 3" variable speed bench grinder that I used during some of the shaping. I ended up taking the buffer wheel off one side and hooking my cordless drill onto the arbor to get it to turn slow with enough torque to grind the hollow grind. The grinder didn't like to turn slow and grind the harden steel.

The handle is maple. I used 1/8" brass rod for the pins. I next epoxied the handle (scales) to the blade. The handle is then finished with boiled linseed oil.



Nice work.
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Old 06-26-2013, 01:46 PM
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I certainly don't need another hobby, but would like to know more about how this works.

Care to put up a grafting thread sometime?
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Old 06-26-2013, 06:22 PM
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One thing about knives, no two people will use the same style for the same purpose but they will use different knife styles for the same reasons.

CEC, I've seen that style blade used locally by some of my friends that are addicted to this hobby. Actually some of these folk do it to supplement income.

Nice work.
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  #9  
Old 06-26-2013, 07:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rickairmedic View Post
Good lookin knife should work well for you since you designed it the way you wanted it instead of one off the shelf.
Rick
Rick,
Thanks... I used it without the handle attached to make the tongue and whip graft. It worked great in my opinion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Camaro Zach View Post
Knife looks great. Do you have any pictures of the different grafts you have done? .......
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnmike View Post
Excellent. I would like to see the grafts as well.
Zach, Mike,
Thanks....I took some pictures just for ya'll.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brucew View Post
Nice work on the knife.

When I was in junior high my dad got into grafting. He grafted apples onto pear trees, pears onto apple trees plums onto peach trees, and I don't recall what else. I remember telling about it in a science class and the teacher didn't believe me. Some classmates came over and saw the fruit growing on all the trees. It was odd picking plums off of a peach tree.

His grafting hobby ended when my mother found some grapes grafted onto her wall of rose bushes.
Bruce... How long did the pears on apple live... I got one growing that way from last year grafting. The man who gave me the rootstock though it was pear

Quote:
Originally Posted by moe1942 View Post
Nice work.
Thanks Moe.. I enjoyed working on the knife for several nights after the kids got to sleep.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dubby View Post
I certainly don't need another hobby, but would like to know more about how this works.

Care to put up a grafting thread sometime?
Dubby, I'll just starting out myself... there is a whole lot of information on the web by people a lot more experienced than I. But I'll answer any questions that I can.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LW Hiway View Post
One thing about knives, no two people will use the same style for the same purpose but they will use different knife styles for the same reasons.

CEC, I've seen that style blade used locally by some of my friends that are addicted to this hobby. Actually some of these folk do it to supplement income.

Nice work.
Jef,
Thanks.. I copied the shape from knifes I saw for sale on the web. Then adjusted the shape to what felt comfortable in my hand. Right now I'm learning. But who knows.... Right now I'm stooling some rootstock sprouts off my fathers pear tree. Next year hope to do more pears.
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  #10  
Old 06-26-2013, 07:49 PM
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Ok now the pictures of the grafts.

Pic 1 - The cutting (Scion) from Daddy's Pear Tree grafted with a tongue and whip graft to a seedling I grew last year from a seed out of a pear from Daddy's tree.

Pic 2 - close up of the tongue and whip graft union.

Pic 3 - the Scion from my grandfather's Satsuma orange tree to a Trifoliate Orange rootstock using a cleft graft.
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