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  #11  
Old 11-13-2012, 09:05 AM
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Originally Posted by milomilo View Post
If you got the money, here is how you do it.
Thats slicker than snake snot, reminds me of a ball joint press, less the hydraulics. WAY out of my budget.
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  #12  
Old 11-13-2012, 09:06 AM
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Originally Posted by digr View Post
Steel bushings will fall out if you run a bead of weld around the inside, don't have to be pretty! The bushing will shrink and slide out.
Mig or stick ? and if stick, what rod ? I will try it, Ive got two more to remove. BTW, thanks for the tip ! Ive been working by myself for many years now, so I dont get to pick up "tips" personally from working next to other guys. If I dont see it on the net, I typically dont see it.
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  #13  
Old 11-13-2012, 09:09 AM
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Originally Posted by monckywrench View Post
You could use a sharp cape or round nose chisel to split the bushings. Standard cold chisels aren't a good shape for such work.

http://wildetool.com/catid-18.cfm

I tack weld sections of rebar or round stock to my chisels at random angles as handles so I can pound them with a hand sledge while keeping my fingers out of the way. You get better control too, and can often reach deeper than when holding chisels conventionally.
Thanks for the tips, I do have one cape chisel in my collection, but never thought to use it, would be much safer in this instance, as to not disturb the bore. I think I need to pick up a couple more, and maybe a couple "rounds"
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  #14  
Old 11-13-2012, 09:11 AM
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Originally Posted by SmokinDodge View Post
I use an air hammer and a bushing splitter. Once you cut all the way through you can remove the bushing with pliers.

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Another good tip, and I thought those where only for ripping through tin ! I will give it a try too !
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  #15  
Old 11-13-2012, 09:12 AM
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Originally Posted by BurningMetal View Post
If you can get it in a press you can get a washer with the same outside diameter as your bushings grind a flat spot on each side and slide it through and turn it sideways into your slot. I don't know if you have enough room to do that or not. I have done this many times for bearings and bushings. It is a lot stronger than you think it would be.
In this case, I wont be getting it into the press, but I do a significant amount of press work on other items, never tried the washer as you have described it, but I will give it a try in the future, sounds like a good idea, thanks for the tip !
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  #16  
Old 11-13-2012, 09:16 AM
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Originally Posted by camdigger View Post

From the look of the old bushes, I think caving them in with a chisel and pulling them with a vise grip on a slide hammer is your best bet. Even welding a bead around the inside might burn through and damage the bore the bushes set in.
That is how I got them out, I got the torch to turn them red, and then I took a chisel to them to collapse the pressure of them being round, and pulled them out with vice grips. The heat was mostly to break the bond with the bore. I would have not try welding on them, that thin. The next two to come out, are only down about .015-.020 from stock, plenty of meat to weld too.
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  #17  
Old 11-13-2012, 09:23 AM
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Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
I'm a bit cornfused, you used a torch, but didn't blow them out ?

I can't see saving them.

Maybe a fire hazard nearby ?

I'm not the greatest with a torch, but keeping the fire off the part,
and the oxygen on the part (after you get a spot started) will
enable you to cut a nice line right thru the bushing, without
nicking the parent bore.

IIRC they are called spring bushing's, there used to be a shop down in Erie,
that made them.
I used the torch to more or less "break the bond" of the bushing from the bore, that and a cold chisel and vice grips. It took a little work. I did get the better of the two bushings so hot, that it collapsed the pressure that was holding it in, I was afraid of screwing up the bore, so I just heated them past the point of failure, and tried not to cut them, didnt want to "nick" the bore. The one bushing is down in a hole, so its hard to get the angle you want with the flame, let alone be able to see whats going on.

Im pretty good with the torch, when it comes to taking things apart (lots of practice !) but figured that had to be a better way.
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  #18  
Old 11-13-2012, 10:39 AM
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Windy, a long shaft pencil grinder with a stone or a burr works too.
Cut into the bushing with the appropriate cutter for the material,a longitudinal groove just down to the OD of the bushing, then you can break the bushing out of the bore.
I have done this many times when I could not get a bushing to move out of the bore.
It can be slow work, but it does have its advantages.
Dan.
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  #19  
Old 11-13-2012, 10:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Lu47Dan View Post
Windy, a long shaft pencil grinder with a stone or a burr works too.
Cut into the bushing with the appropriate cutter for the material,a longitudinal groove just down to the OD of the bushing, then you can break the bushing out of the bore.
I have done this many times when I could not get a bushing to move out of the bore.
It can be slow work, but it does have its advantages.
Dan.
Gotcha, Ive got a set of carbide bits that I run in a straight die grinder, that and a cape chisel would work too..

thanks for the tip, Windy
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  #20  
Old 11-13-2012, 01:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Windy_Acres View Post
In this case, I wont be getting it into the press, but I do a significant amount of press work on other items, never tried the washer as you have described it, but I will give it a try in the future, sounds like a good idea, thanks for the tip !
I work in a machine shop and we are constantly pressing bearings ,bushings,ball joints,universals,pretty much anything you can think of we have to get pretty creative sometimes. If its not challenging its not fun. Good luck with your bushings.
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