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  #21  
Old 06-07-2020, 10:53 PM
Folkpunk Folkpunk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GWIZ View Post
We have this thread about the 6011 Lincoln rods.
https://www.shopfloortalk.com/forums...ad.php?t=33337
I will check this out. Thanks!
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  #22  
Old 06-08-2020, 11:01 AM
Folkpunk Folkpunk is offline
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Originally Posted by Matt Shade View Post
Just to clarify as you seem confused by the whole AC and DC thing.

AC is alternating current, the same as what comes out of the outlet you are plugged into. It switches from positive to negative at 60 times per second. There is no electrode negative or positive, because it is switching from one to the other at a rate of 60hz. If you are using AC, you will need to use an appropriate rod. 6011, 6013 are the most common for that setting and with practice you can get perfectly serviceable results.

DC is direct current. This is like the power from a car battery. The current only travels one way, so if you hook your electrode to the positive lug it is positive, if you hook it to the negative it is negative. Many electrodes can be run positive or negative, you will find that the main difference is how hot it welds and you might switch polarity for different jobs/thicknesses of metal. DC runs smoother and is more versatile. It opens up your options to more types of welding rod and is easier to make a bead with a nice appearance. If you have the option to run DC and you have the appropriate rod, you should probably do so.

6011 sticks fairly easily when you are starting it, but once an arc is going it usually runs pretty easy. I have run 3/32 as low as 45 amps before on an AC machine. If you are able to start an acceptable weld and it suddenly sticks a couple inches in, you probably need to look at your welder, cords, and outlets to make sure you aren't getting a voltage drop as you weld. If you just can't get an arc started, it might just be a matter of practice and you will have other problems if you turn the amperage up too high.

Another thing to look at is the ground clamp on your welder and where it is attached to your work. A poor ground connection can cause intermittent arcs and all kinds of problems. Clean the metal where you are going to attach the ground clamp just like you clean the metal where you are going to weld, and make sure the clamp is attached firmly and as close to the weld area as practical.
Great info. Thanks!
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  #23  
Old 06-08-2020, 06:33 PM
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mccutter mccutter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Folkpunk View Post
Still popping the breaker, but not as often. I will be bringing out an electrician to install a 40amp breaker along with a nema style outlet.
Refresh our memory: what machine are you using? If using 110v, 20A is about the max you want to wire for and I don't see why an electrician needs to get involved but that is just me... As welders, we need to be able to diagnose our machines to be productive and wiring an outlet is really not that hard.

I don't know what this 40A breaker is that you speak of--NEVER over-breaker your wiring because you will start a fire!

If this is a dual voltage machine (ie: 220v, also) the minimum you would/should wire in is a NEMA 6-50 outlet as many welders use this style. 8ga would be the wire to use. It is ALWAYS better to weld on 220 vs 110v...

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Originally Posted by Folkpunk View Post
They're pretty ugly but getting somewhere.
You've used an oxymoron, BTW...
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  #24  
Old 06-08-2020, 06:39 PM
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Matt Shade Matt Shade is offline
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There are 120V receptacles available that are rated for 30amps with the appropriate wiring etc. if you are limited to 120V on your machine.

One farm I regularly do repairs at has a 30 amp normal 120V outlet by the grain bins and I have had good luck both fluxcore and stick welding on it with my MP 210 and a heavy 50ft extension cord. I haven't found that I can do much of anything on a 15amp circuit no matter how thin of stuff I want to weld.
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  #25  
Old 06-08-2020, 07:05 PM
Folkpunk Folkpunk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mccutter View Post
I don't know what this 40A breaker is that you speak of--NEVER over-breaker your wiring because you will start a fire!

If this is a dual voltage machine (ie: 220v, also) the minimum you would/should wire in is a NEMA 6-50 outlet as many welders use this style. 8ga would be the wire to use. It is ALWAYS better to weld on 220 vs 110v...

You've used an oxymoron, BTW...
Oh, definitely don't want start a fire. The manufacturer, AHP, said I should install at least a 40+ amp breaker to power a Nema 6-50 outlet. The machine is indeed duel voltage.

You're right that is an oxymoron.LOL
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  #26  
Old 06-08-2020, 07:08 PM
Folkpunk Folkpunk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Shade View Post
There are 120V receptacles available that are rated for 30amps with the appropriate wiring etc. if you are limited to 120V on your machine.

One farm I regularly do repairs at has a 30 amp normal 120V outlet by the grain bins and I have had good luck both fluxcore and stick welding on it with my MP 210 and a heavy 50ft extension cord. I haven't found that I can do much of anything on a 15amp circuit no matter how thin of stuff I want to weld.
It does 220 as well. The manufacturer recommended a 40+ amp breaker.
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  #27  
Old 06-08-2020, 09:44 PM
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greywynd greywynd is offline
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Some of the machines we use in the field are setup for 30A 120V. Some of the customers shops have them setup. (Not sure the designation, they are a twistlock though.)

We have adapters to drop to 15A supply outlets if we don’t have the 30’s available. It’s a pain in the ass though, overwork the machine and you’re tripping breakers somewhere.


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  #28  
Old 06-08-2020, 10:17 PM
Folkpunk Folkpunk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greywynd View Post
Some of the machines we use in the field are setup for 30A 120V. Some of the customers shops have them setup. (Not sure the designation, they are a twistlock though.)

We have adapters to drop to 15A supply outlets if we don’t have the 30’s available. It’s a pain in the ass though, overwork the machine and you’re tripping breakers somewhere.


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I'll post some pics in the next day or so that may give everyone the full story. I was considering an unboxing vid but right now I don't want to get lost in producing a video and posting etc. I do have a nema to Edison adapter if that's what you're referring to.
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  #29  
Old 06-08-2020, 10:25 PM
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Shade Tree Welder Shade Tree Welder is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Folkpunk View Post
Oh, definitely don't want start a fire. The manufacturer, AHP, said I should install at least a 40+ amp breaker to power a Nema 6-50 outlet. The machine is indeed duel voltage.

You're right that is an oxymoron.LOL
Dual voltage is safer, that way you don't have bullets flying around the shop.

Definitely get a receptacle wired for 230V I would strongly recommend it for 50
amps. You might want to consider a 4 prong outlet. Where you have both hots
and a neutral available and of course a ground. That way if you buy something
down the road you that needs a neutral wire it is there. 50A/230V will cover a
lot of machines.

Since you are a hobby guy learning you really only need 1 outlet. But if you
get an air compressor for lets say a plasma cutter (which use a lot of air.) you
might want 2 x 50A/230V outlets. and if you need an electrician it might be
cheaper to have them do both in one trip.

I have good luck with Nema 14-50 outlets and plugs, I buy either Pass and
Seymour or Hubbell brand. Leviton is garbage.
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  #30  
Old 06-09-2020, 12:24 AM
Folkpunk Folkpunk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shade Tree Welder View Post
Dual voltage is safer, that way you don't have bullets flying around the shop.

Definitely get a receptacle wired for 230V I would strongly recommend it for 50
amps. You might want to consider a 4 prong outlet. Where you have both hots
and a neutral available and of course a ground. That way if you buy something
down the road you that needs a neutral wire it is there. 50A/230V will cover a
lot of machines.

Since you are a hobby guy learning you really only need 1 outlet. But if you
get an air compressor for lets say a plasma cutter (which use a lot of air.) you
might want 2 x 50A/230V outlets. and if you need an electrician it might be
cheaper to have them do both in one trip.

I have good luck with Nema 14-50 outlets and plugs, I buy either Pass and
Seymour or Hubbell brand. Leviton is garbage.
I like that idea of future proofing. Just found a 6-50 to 14-50 adapter for 70 bucks.
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