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  #31  
Old 06-10-2020, 10:43 AM
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monckywrench monckywrench is offline
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I've run my Miller 340 AB/P (not maxed out of course) off a 50-foot cord to a 50A receptacle with no hassles though running .045" flux core off a suitcase feeder would trip the breaker now and then. My panel is inside a steel shipping container so even a dead short to ground anywhere wouldn't matter. That breaker is now 100A and eventually I'll run conduit closer to the machine.

You can never have too many heavy duty cords (I make my own) so I gradually acquire the parts as opportunity (liquidation auctions, estate sales etc) offers.

Welding cable can be accumulated cheaply now scrap prices are in the toilet. I've bought old welding machines for the cable and since there's no such thing as too many welders I tactically scatter them to avoid having to move machines. QD connectors are cheap (but be warned the rubber on Radnor connectors is trash, they're usually made in India) making it affordable to have many cables then connect just what ya need.

All my welders get heavy castered bases too and I recently discovered scaffolding casters are inexpensive, have large wheels (8" is a good size and will roll on decent gravel or other firm terrain), brakes, swivel and are easy to use. If you weld tubes for them to your bases you can quickly remove and install them by jacking the machine then sliding them into the tube.
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  #32  
Old 06-17-2020, 09:49 AM
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Sberry Sberry is offline
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A couple things. A 6/50 is the correct outlet for 240 on that machine. Second, it will run 50 ft of 12 on 120 and it's not the wire tripping but the breaker. This machine can run from 120/30 but the twist on the outlet and adapter is really the right way to do that. It's fine for the welder but other stuff in the normal world is designed to be run on circuit limited to 20A.
3/32 6011 is a 65A rod. 1/8 85 to 87 or so. Yes, dials are different but it should be able to run from 20. About all that can be had from 120/20 is 90A in a decent inverter. Have never used an Alpha but there are lots guys got them, should be some real world out there.
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  #33  
Old 06-17-2020, 10:55 AM
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camdigger camdigger is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sberry View Post
A couple things. A 6/50 is the correct outlet for 240 on that machine. Second, it will run 50 ft of 12 on 120 and it's not the wire tripping but the breaker. This machine can run from 120/30 but the twist on the outlet and adapter is really the right way to do that. It's fine for the welder but other stuff in the normal world is designed to be run on circuit limited to 20A.
3/32 6011 is a 65A rod. 1/8 85 to 87 or so. Yes, dials are different but it should be able to run from 20. About all that can be had from 120/20 is 90A in a decent inverter. Have never used an Alpha but there are lots guys got them, should be some real world out there.
Umm, interesting coincidence is that Weld. Com recently posted a YouTube video showing an inverter running on a 12/2 extension cord plugged into a 110/20 amp circuit. The welding was done with 1/8" 7018 at 120 amps. There seemed to be lots of heat for the work done, but the energy in vs energy out didn't seem to jive. I have yet to get an answer to the comment I posted questioning it.
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  #34  
Old 07-12-2020, 09:19 AM
o7oBaseMetal o7oBaseMetal is offline
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Not sure if it has been mentioned but there is often differences from one TIG machine to another in actual heat to amperage setting, even same manufacturer and model. Some are worse than others. I noticed quite a major inconsistency between Esab mini arc 161 machines. To match 45 amps on a Miller Maxstar 150 you might need to do 30 amps on one Esab but another you might need to put it on 50 amps.

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  #35  
Old 07-15-2020, 07:24 AM
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gimpyrobb gimpyrobb is offline
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If you're new to welding, try slowing down your travel speed. Most new guys want to move down the line too quickly.
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