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Old 03-09-2019, 12:40 PM
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Default priming bare metal for painting

Hello all, I've heard that primer helps with the adhesion of the paint, but can't I just rough up the metal with some sandpaper and paint? the reason I ask is that it's too cold outside, and I don't want to use the spray can primers in the house. this is just for a hobby craft project which will be used indoors. Thanks
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Old 03-09-2019, 12:59 PM
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Originally Posted by biker55 View Post
Hello all, I've heard that primer helps with the adhesion of the paint, but can't I just rough up the metal with some sandpaper and paint? the reason I ask is that it's too cold outside, and I don't want to use the spray can primers in the house. this is just for a hobby craft project which will be used indoors. Thanks
Primer is used to act as a:
An adhesion agent, which helps the color coat adhere to the surface among allowing the surface to be painted with less color coat having to be used.

The primer also serves as an inhibitor depending on the type of primer being used. (i.e.) sandable, high fill as well as a sealant in the intended application.

Sandable High fill primers are for use in hiding small scratches and blemishes in the surface to be color coated.
Sealer primers are used for sealing off contaminated surfaces and if changing from let say and acrylic single stage paint to a two or three stage like base coat clear coat.

and then you have the various degrees of primers for use as a rust inhibitor from basic primer to self-etching primers...

So yes it is prolly a good idea to use a primer on metals if you want the finish to come out high contrast and lasting...

But with all that being said if it Were me, and it is something for me and I have the extra pain to waste till I get a finish I am happy with by all means I'll paint the heck out of it with just a coat of candy color "paint" and be done with it... but if for a client I'll go through all the painstaking steps and with my beat down old Butt it is painstaking

I might post about it later on, and you might see what I'm talking about. as I'll be doing a re-color to match the trim and secondary color on a client's bumpers on his truck but am being lazy as I'm teaching a youngster the how too's... Being I'm not very mobile and is a literal pain in the bumper sitting in a chair trying to wet sand and prep, the bumpers.
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Last edited by MetalWolf; 03-09-2019 at 01:06 PM.
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Old 03-09-2019, 01:01 PM
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you can do what ever you want we are very supportive here.

The reason you use primer on metal is that it is designed to both adhere to the metal and provide a surface that paint will adhere to.
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Old 03-09-2019, 01:12 PM
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Maybe first I should ask what type of paint are you using??

and do you have any lacquer thinner or wash thinner to clean the metal once you sand to a suitable pre-prep finish.
a super clean surface will make all the difference
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Last edited by MetalWolf; 03-09-2019 at 01:29 PM.
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Old 03-09-2019, 01:24 PM
Spencer Spencer is offline
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Here is the way it was designed to me:

Primer is designed to stick to the base material and itself. Paint is designed to stick to primer and itself.
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Old 03-09-2019, 01:37 PM
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Originally Posted by MetalWolf View Post
Maybe first I should ask what type of paint are you using??

and do you have any lacquer thinner or wash thinner to clean the metal once you sand to a suitable pre-prep finish.
a super clean surface will make all the difference
I was going to use acetone to clean the metal and then use enamel paint on it with a clear finish. Thanks
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Old 03-09-2019, 01:39 PM
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you can do what ever you want we are very supportive here.

The reason you use primer on metal is that it is designed to both adhere to the metal and provide a surface that paint will adhere to.
you're a funny guy.
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Old 03-09-2019, 01:45 PM
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I was going to use acetone to clean the metal and then use enamel paint on it with a clear finish. Thanks
Sand the metal really good to your liking, if all you have is acetone it will work to clean but if you have mineral spirits. best prosses is to clean with a white cloth till you have no discoloring of the white cloth. as you would be surprised how much wiping it would take some time to achieve this then wipe down with acetone just before painting and you will have a fine lasting finish...

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Originally Posted by biker55 View Post
with a clear finish
This is JIMO...
Do you mean a clear coat after? When it comes to straight enamels I don't know of any clear coat the does not jeopardize the enamel and finish.
enamels usually have a natural luster once the paint has laid and flashed over. and so far any clear coating offered for enamels has been useless...
There is a brand of pain called magic can be found at TSC. that has served me well and leaves an amazing mirror luster finish. they as well offer a clear coating but I found it to be useless as well and had to strip and repaint once I tried it... due to the clear coating it took away all the glory of the enamel lustering shine.

here are two examples prolly a bit bigger project than I assume your doing but Red tractor is without the clear coat and the blue is one I had to re-do as I used the clear coat.
Click image for larger version

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Last edited by MetalWolf; 03-09-2019 at 02:08 PM.
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Old 03-09-2019, 02:08 PM
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It's simple really. How often do you want to re-paint your stuff? When it comes to paint there is no magic bullet. The better your prep the longer your finish will last. Period.

I hate painting--even having to use a spray-bomb irritates me. If a customer wants to paint something that we have fabricated I'll arrange for custom paint and I'll deliver it to the paint shop but that's it.

Depending on what the customer wants we use automotive finishes, industrial two-part epoxy processes and a lot of powder coating. For highest and best finish and durability we will specify a sandblast, phosphate dip, primer coat and two (or more) finish coats. Not cheap but the paint will stand up to a lot of outdoor use for a long time. On the other hand, if the customer just wants some "colour" on the product a quick wipedown with lacquer thinner and a single finish coat may be all it takes. It's always the customers choice and we always make sure they know what the end result will be.

It always amazes me how many people cheap out on paint. Customer will want a cheap finish and I will carefully explain their options and then (reluctantly) have someone spray it down with a spray bomb. Six months later the guy is back complaining about the rust spots on the part. Tough shit. You were warned...
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Old 03-09-2019, 04:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MetalWolf View Post
Sand the metal really good to your liking, if all you have is acetone it will work to clean but if you have mineral spirits. best prosses is to clean with a white cloth till you have no discoloring of the white cloth. as you would be surprised how much wiping it would take some time to achieve this then wipe down with acetone just before painting and you will have a fine lasting finish...


This is JIMO...
Do you mean a clear coat after? When it comes to straight enamels I don't know of any clear coat the does not jeopardize the enamel and finish.
enamels usually have a natural luster once the paint has laid and flashed over. and so far any clear coating offered for enamels has been useless...
There is a brand of pain called magic can be found at TSC. that has served me well and leaves an amazing mirror luster finish. they as well offer a clear coating but I found it to be useless as well and had to strip and repaint once I tried it... due to the clear coating it took away all the glory of the enamel lustering shine.

here are two examples prolly a bit bigger project than I assume your doing but Red tractor is without the clear coat and the blue is one I had to re-do as I used the clear coat.
Attachment 149784Attachment 149785Attachment 149786Attachment 149787
maybe it's my eye, but both tractors look nice. I'll take your advice and hold off on the clear coat.
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