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  #11  
Old 03-08-2019, 10:05 AM
mikeysp mikeysp is offline
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Ok, this really helps. I did not even know what to call it "Strength of Materials" and "Weldment Design". This has opened up a bunch of info to my eyes.

I also found an 82 page pdf online "Design for Welding" by searching Lincoln Design of Weldments pdf. Mr Blodgett is one of the contributors to the book. Tiis will give me a book to read and discover how far away my ability to learn this information is.

The lincoln foundation also has a manual and a problem/solution book for $5 as well as the refernced manual.


GWIZ, Thanks. I followed that link and began reading when it referenced other links, so I will work through it and the follow on links there to see if it gets me closer to the mark.

Thank all of you for chiming in to help me on this journey.

I just finished fabricating a debarker for my sawmill and I need to go install it over the next few hours. But I will put aside some reading time this evening.

-Mike
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  #12  
Old 03-08-2019, 10:28 AM
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I was visiting Lincoln, and got Mr. Blodgett to sign my copy.
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  #13  
Old 03-08-2019, 10:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeysp View Post

I just finished fabricating a debarker for my sawmill and I need to go install it over the next few hours. But I will put aside some reading time this evening.

-Mike
Isn't that just a simple "Mud Saw", a small circular saw blade set ahead of the
cut ?
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  #14  
Old 03-08-2019, 06:50 PM
JBFab JBFab is offline
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Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
I was visiting Lincoln, and got Mr. Blodgett to sign my copy.
If you ever contemplate selling that book I'd love a chance to buy. I never did get to meet Omer before he passed, but he was certainly an incredible man.

I'd be honored to meet his successor Duane Miller someday.

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  #15  
Old 03-08-2019, 10:22 PM
mikeysp mikeysp is offline
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Yes, I have heard it called a mudsaw before. Below is a pic of the factory one that I am largely copying and the one I am installing.
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  #16  
Old 03-08-2019, 11:03 PM
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chumly2071 chumly2071 is offline
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Miller was a very nice guy, and a genius in his own right when I met him at the seminar I took in Cleveland.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBFab View Post
If you ever contemplate selling that book I'd love a chance to buy. I never did get to meet Omer before he passed, but he was certainly an incredible man.

I'd be honored to meet his successor Duane Miller someday.

Sent from my SM-N960U using ShopFloorTalk mobile app
Sent from my SM-G920V using ShopFloorTalk mobile app
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  #17  
Old 03-09-2019, 08:46 AM
threepiece threepiece is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by randydupree View Post
I'm going to say most of the guys here have built lots of stuff and never looked at any drawings or anything else.
They did pay attention to gantry cranes,wreckers,truck cranes,home made contraptions and swing sets modded to pull engines etc.
Tree limbs that were too small had a board shoring up the limb.
The board was small too,in most cases.

My advice,pay attention to everything,you will see failed creations and you will learn from that.
You will see overbuilt stuff too.
But mostly you will see things built out of whatever we had laying around,most of us never had the money to buy new steel,we stole,scrapped,traded and did whatever we could do to build what we needed.

Everyday i see something thats being built and i say "that will never work!"
Here Here!

Yes, most anybody can successfully build most anything without the need of advanced formulas. Many machines and structures have been built by people with little more knowledge of mathematics than reading a scale. (I am one of those people) These things are built by thoughtful people who have developed skill and an understanding of different types of stresses and how to cater to them. These stresses are primarily tension, compression, torsion and shear.

For the most part engineering formulas are needed when cost (either time or money) or packaging constraints is of concern.
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  #18  
Old 03-09-2019, 11:46 AM
mikeysp mikeysp is offline
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It is one of those projects that has a factor that returned me to this math issue.

I am trying to design a log lifting device and I want it to be a lot lighter than I would make it if I just did it with the 3x3 or 6x6 square tube I have lying around. I would make plenty strong enough if I just did it based on concept from experience and observation.

Because weight is a BIG concern for this project as well as the first concern: it works safely and without fail, I need to revisit this idea of math (including safety margin math) again.

What I would currently build would probably be good enough for a 30K Lb log, but.... that is all a guess

I think, but I want to know.

Thanks for the help gents.

-Mike
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  #19  
Old 03-09-2019, 01:48 PM
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Norm W Norm W is offline
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Most folks build something..... if it bends and it wasn't supposed to, build it heavier. If it is too heavy, figure out where to make it lighter. The "How" comes from experience. Good decisions come with experience, experience comes from bad decisions.
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  #20  
Old 03-12-2019, 08:37 AM
mikeysp mikeysp is offline
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interestingly, I had a retired corporate mechanical engineer at my place yesterday (sold him something). I mentioned to him this dilema, and he told me he doesn't go this route for stuff for himself. He looks for stuff to copy, as most shapes have been done. As has been mentioned. Interesting.

-Mike
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