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  #91  
Old 03-06-2019, 08:13 PM
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Dr Dean Dr Dean is offline
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Our big press at work is I think 75 ton and all we have is flat bars about 1.5 by 3. Then we also have some 1 by 3 inch bars to put cross ways to the thicker bars. I honestly don't see a need for the fancy cut plates. In all the shops I've worked in never had those plates. BTW if you're going to be working in the 40+ ton range make sure you put all the pins in on the height adjustment, 50 tons will shear a couple of 1 inch pins and cause a lot of excitement.

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  #92  
Old 03-06-2019, 08:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spencer View Post
9.75" from the outside edge to the outside edge. These plates will hang over the edge by 2 1/8" on each side if perfectly centered.

I mocked up a set of 12" x 12" plates and the 1 1/8" overhang just didn't seem large enough, especially when sliding them from side to side or rotating them around.
I would get yourself two 12" plates out of 3/4" or 1"material, you are not going to be happy with those big plates.
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  #93  
Old 03-10-2019, 07:16 PM
Spencer Spencer is offline
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I finally got the motor and remote control rewired yesterday, but while the press was technically operational at that point, I hadn't finished up my pushing adapter yet.

My water-cooled tig torch had sprung a leak a while back, so I finished up the last welding job I had with my old portable Thermal Dynamics unit. While I could have used that to weld up the pushing adapter, I used fixing or replacing the tig torch on my Miller Dynasty as an excuse to get it taken care of. I lucked out and fixing the broken line ended up being very easy.

So, now that I had my Miller up and running today I went ahead and got the pushing adapter welded together, as seen in this first photo. I tacked the two pieces together in three spots and then welded it in six different intervals, rotating it by one flat of the nut each time. It would have been helpful to have some kind of rotating weld positioner, but with as out of practice as I am on welding it probably wouldn't have made much of a difference.

I got the HAZ cleaned up a bit on the wire wheel while I was prepping it for paint, as seen in the second photo. Once they were both primed, I painted the two separate pieces of the pushing adapter separate colors. It sucks having to paint in an unheated shop in the Winter, but with a little help from a heat gun I think the paint will hold up for a while.
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  #94  
Old 03-10-2019, 07:29 PM
Spencer Spencer is offline
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Now that the pushing adapter is complete, it was time to put this press to the test. The toughest project I've had lined up for it is straightening out my forks on the front end loader on my tractor.

I abuse the hell out of these forks by taking out stumps and usually whole trees with the stumps still attached with it. I've taken these forks to a big fabrication shop a few miles away before and paid them to straighten them out. I've been looking forward to being able to do it myself, although I don't plan to do it too often.

Normally one fork is bent bit worse than the other, but remarkably, both of these were deflected by the same 1 5/16". I mentioned in post #82 that I still needed to move the press into its final position. The first spot I had it was sitting behind the miller welder in photo #3. I decided to move it to where you see in now in photo #3 for a variety of reasons, one of which is so I can use one of the arms of my 4-post vehicle lift as an adjustable height support. That worked out just as good as I had hoped while positioning these forks for straightening.

The original pressure gauge on the hydraulic pump is not working, so I have no idea how much force I was actually applying. I can tell you that while the motor changed sounds, it did not seem to be straining or showing any signs that it was going to stop on its own.
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  #95  
Old 03-10-2019, 07:32 PM
Spencer Spencer is offline
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This first photo shows how much of the deflection I took out of the first fork before I got started on the second. I could have played around with both of these forks a lot more than I did, but I know I'm just going to bend them up again this Spring and Summer.

I have a delivery I have to unload off of a semi-truck tomorrow, so I was glad to get them just somewhat straight, as it makes sliding under the pallets a lot less challenging than when they are bent up like clown shoes.
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  #96  
Old 03-10-2019, 07:46 PM
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While I won't bore you with every project I end up doing on this press, I will share the second quick little project I did right after straightening up the forks.

I have a variety of plumbing pipes that I've used for cheater bars in the past and I always wished I had a way to flatten them out a bit, so that I wouldn't need to use such an oversized section of pipe to fit over the end of a wrench.

This first attempt I made at making a more oblong end to one of those pipes turned out perfectly. This section of pipe has an approximate OD of 1 5/8", which isn't big enough to fit a very large wrench.

I got it sandwiched in between my new 2" arbor plates I mentioned in Post #88. I picked those up on Friday and yes, they are heavy. I have absolutely no regrets going with 2" or making them 14" square. When I get to old to be able to man-handle them I'll just use my lifting magnet to move them around. You can see my lifting magnet in Photo #2, as I was using it to keep the edges of the arbor plates lined up with each other.


In photo #3 you can see the pipe on the back side of the arbor plates. Although I had the arbor plates centered under the ram, it started compressing the end of the pipe first, which does make sense. I had put a couple of 1" square aluminum tubes between the arbor plates, so I could use those to judge how evenly it was pressing and to also act as a guide for just how far I was going to compress the pipe.

In photo #4 I'm checking to see how well a 3/4" wrench was fitting before I finished compressing the pipe down to a 1" thickness.

The last photo shows how I had to reposition the arbor plates to apply more pressure further away from the end of the pipe to get a uniform 1" thickness front to back and side to side.
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  #97  
Old 03-10-2019, 07:47 PM
Spencer Spencer is offline
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Here is the completed cheater bar, which is just the first of many I plan on making.

In the second photo you can see the nice radius it pressed into the pipe. I purposefully used the large radius on the one side of the arbor plates to give the cheater bar what I hope to be a less stressful transition from the round shape to the oblong shape. Photo #3 shows a side view of that same transition point.

Photos #4 is just showing it extended over that same 3/4" wrench. Photo #5 shows it in use on one of the quick-attach levers on my front end loader. As I mentioned, I abuse the hell out of that loader, so those levers are not as easy to engage and disengage as they were when it was new.
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  #98  
Old 03-10-2019, 08:13 PM
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Excellent. Now, are you going to paint the cheater bars too?
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  #99  
Old 03-24-2019, 06:34 PM
Spencer Spencer is offline
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The threads on the bottom of the hydraulic ram were a bit chewed up in one particular spot, which has bothered me.

They weren't chewed up so bad that the nut on my pushing adapter wouldn't thread on, but you could definitely tell there was an issue.

Even if I could have found a reasonable priced die for this large of a thread with having the portion of the threads that were chewed up right at the bottom of the ram, the die would not have been an ideal solution.

Here is a picture of the buggered up threads.
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  #100  
Old 03-24-2019, 06:37 PM
Spencer Spencer is offline
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I found that OTC, the same manufacturer of the press itself, makes a tool for situations like this. Their "OTC Tools 7402 Universal Outside Thread Chaser" comes with six different square dies, each one with a different thread on each side of the square. This will work on diameters from as small at 1 1/4" all the way up to 5". The tool is much larger that I was expecting.

One nice side benefit of this tool is that it works great to clean all the grime and grit out of the threads too.

You can see in a few of these pictures just how much crap it got out of the threads. That is after I had done by best to clean those threads weeks ago when I bought the press home.
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