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  #11  
Old 06-21-2019, 07:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Matt Shade View Post
Have to do something to balance the fact that I'm a sarcastic asshole
Right on..
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  #12  
Old 06-23-2019, 01:41 PM
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Hi,
Very nice!

When I started forging knives about 25 years ago...

I read about Rudy Ruana and his preference for using Studebaker car springs for steel.

Happened on an old man at the time, that had a junk 1939 Studebaker truck and bought both sets of the rear springs for $5!

I used those to make knives and sold the knives to co-workers that deer hunted.

They told me the knives would stay sharper than any other that they had used and also were easier/quicker to sharpen when needed.

I sold enough knives to just about pay for my little shop and still have some of the springs left!

If you want to know in more detail about heat treating 5160 (spring steel) for use as knives let me know.

I know what worked for me, to get the most out of the steel!
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  #13  
Old 06-23-2019, 06:24 PM
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so cool... just not set up for that work.


wish i had one of them little guys
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  #14  
Old 06-25-2019, 08:00 PM
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Originally Posted by seagiant View Post
Hi,
Very nice!

When I started forging knives about 25 years ago...

I read about Rudy Ruana and his preference for using Studebaker car springs for steel.

Happened on an old man at the time, that had a junk 1939 Studebaker truck and bought both sets of the rear springs for $5!

I used those to make knives and sold the knives to co-workers that deer hunted.

They told me the knives would stay sharper than any other that they had used and also were easier/quicker to sharpen when needed.

I sold enough knives to just about pay for my little shop and still have some of the springs left!

If you want to know in more detail about heat treating 5160 (spring steel) for use as knives let me know.

I know what worked for me, to get the most out of the steel!
You could definitely post your recipe here if you want, I'm sure someone could use it. I don't think these jeep springs are 5160 exactly, having used a good bit of it from a steel supply. Its in the ballpark but doesn't behave quite the same. I have done quite a bit of experimenting with this stuff and have a pretty good system down for the oil I quench in and the equipment I have.

At the very least you should share some pics of your knives with us


Thanks Woody. It doesn't take as much set up as some folks think though, I bet just about every member here could make a knife by stock removal with what they have in their shop, and most could build a forge if they wanted too as well.
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  #15  
Old 06-26-2019, 07:49 AM
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Hi,
Ok, here is how I forge and heat treat 1939 Studebaker spring for hunting or fighting knives.

I forge the knife to shape at probably orange heat which is way above it's "critical temperature".

Critical Temp for this steel is about 1550deg.F

These temps are gauged by eye.

So, forge the blade any way you want to shape, then I do a packing heat where I only bring the blade to critical temp (dull red) and then finish forging the edge only known as "packing the edge", this will mechanically and heat wise, shrink the grain structure of the steel.

Do this as many times as it takes but never let the blade get to over critical temp again.

I then bring blade to critical temp and set in ashes to anneal the steel for grinding the blade.

When I have the blade rough ground and ready to harden, I will bring the blade up to critical temp 3 more times and let it cool in the open to shrink the grain structure and to "normalize" the steel to remove stress.

This is important as you want to get rid of stress to stop any warpage or cracks or faults in the blade.

I use ATF for quenching oil and heat it to 150 deg.F., this is easily done by heating a steel bar and quenching in the oil to heat it. This also cuts down on stress at the quenching.

Ok, at the third heat at critical temp with the oil heated I quench the blade keeping it in a horizontal position to the oil tank.

Just as a side note if you like the looks of a Japanese hamon you can clay the top of the knife with premixed kiln cement.

This will make a very nice hamon and also of course give you a hard edge and a softer back which is desirable in a fighting knife.

Ok, knife is quenched, test hardness of blade with a new file.

The file should "skate" on the edge, not grabbing at all on the steel.

This tells you that you hit the numbers right on the temp when quenched.

I have a small toaster oven and use that with a oven temp gauge to temper with. I temper at 350 deg.F for an hour bring the blade out and let it cool then temper again for another hour at the same temp.

This gives me about a 57 Rc hardness.

Using this formula with my steel, works well for me.

I would advise anyone to take the time and experiment with the steel they decide to use and to even make blades to cut test, bend test and break test!

This will let you know what your knives will or won't do and give you some hard won knowledge!
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