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Old 03-21-2020, 05:45 AM
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Default Getting shafted

I have a small project that requires attaching a 6" OD bicycle sprocket to a 1/2" shaft. I have considered using a Woodruff key to lock the shaft to the hub, but don't have a method to make a keyway in the shaft, other than by using a Dremel grinder. Since the applied torque and speed of rotation are both very low, I'm wondering if I can just drill shallow holes in the shaft to accommodate a couple of set screws through the hub to fix it to the shaft.

What do you guys think? And, thanks.
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Old 03-21-2020, 06:35 AM
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That will work
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Old 03-21-2020, 07:54 AM
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or a Dutch key, if the shaft was bigger. For 1/2" shaft setscrews will do.
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Old 03-23-2020, 05:36 AM
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You may need a long drill and tap to make the threaded hole. Rather than buying longer you could weld or braze mild steel extensions to your current tools. I have done this several times using s piece of angle steel and small C clamps as a jig to align the pieces. Use a steel rod of the same diameter as the tool it is attaching to.

Helpful hint: create a small flat on the pointed corner of the angle with a file or grinder. This makes positioning the C clamps much easier.
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Old 03-23-2020, 05:53 AM
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I considered drilling shallow holes in the shafts for the set screws to engage in order to lock the hubs to the shafts. But, now, I'm thinking it would be difficult to align the holes with the screws, should I need to R&R. So, plan is to tig tiny nubbins on shafts, and sculpt by Dremel, that will substitute for Woodruff keys.
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Old 03-23-2020, 12:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gadgeteer View Post
...Since the applied torque and speed of rotation are both very low...
I think people are over-complicating this. If you want a couple dimples in the shaft put one setscrew in place, lightly tighten it and then, using a drill that fits inside the threads of the other hole, put one dimple in the shaft. Put the second screw in place, remove the first and drill the second hole. You don't need much, just a little disturbance on the surface of the shaft to anchor the end of the setscrew.

Even a couple small flats ground onto the surface of the shaft will work. Same procedure. Line everything up, insert one screw, mark the second location with a pencil or transfer punch--if you've got one--take it all apart and grind your two flats. Done...
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Old 03-23-2020, 09:07 PM
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You could just drill through the whole works and put a small bolt or roll pin through it.

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