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  #21  
Old 01-03-2017, 09:09 AM
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LKeithR LKeithR is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TEK View Post
...When it's 100F at midnight and 5% humidity they dried pretty quick...
Back in the mid-60s I spent three years working on a ranch east of Williams Lake, B.C. People I worked for were Americans as were several other families in the same area--they all came from down around Redding in California.

Naturally they did a lot of socializing together and, since the people I worked for treated me like one of the family I often sat in on the get togethers. One of the things they loved to do was play Pinochle and, since I was available, I often got drafted to make up a "fourth" for a table. Pinochle is an American game--it took a while to catch on but it was fun and interesting once I got the hang of it. If you've never played take a moment to look up the rules--you'll find them to be rather unique.

Anyhow, I digress a bit but one of the things I really liked about the get togethers was all the storytelling. As I said, they were all American and they knew how to BS with the best of them. Everyone came from different backgrounds so there were always a variety of stories to be told--interesting stuff for and 18 year old.

The guy I worked for spent years working as a construction super for the McCloud River Timber Company north of Redding. He told many interesting tales of working in the bush on the flanks of Mt. Shasta.

Two of the other guys in the group had owned a hay company before moving north. A lot the hay they moved came from down around Modesto and I remember them talking about moving hay in the summer time. They timed their trips so that they could do their loading in the middle of the night when the temps were "only" 100 degrees...
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  #22  
Old 01-03-2017, 02:59 PM
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It's too hot down here for much ppe. I wear boots pants no shirt and a welding helmet.
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  #23  
Old 01-03-2017, 03:39 PM
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I generally wear a FR jacket, just the treated cotton, no leather. I keep one hanging in the shop and just put it on when I go out most of the time. I don't really think about what shirt I'm going to wear or what I'm going to be doing when I start the day and the FR jackets are a lot cheaper than burning holes in ever "nice" shirt I own. Beyond that its just safety glasses, gloves when necessary, and a helmet. I do have leather sleeves for when I'm in a bad spot or welding overhead.
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  #24  
Old 01-03-2017, 10:08 PM
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a nomex racing jacket isn't a good replacement for leathers when welding overhead. I tried that once!
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  #25  
Old 01-09-2017, 04:31 PM
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leather apron or light welding shirt long sleeves, long pants and definitely leather boots.
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  #26  
Old 01-12-2017, 01:06 AM
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Quote:
What's your preferred gear for welding protection? (I.E. hood, jacket or shirt, gloves, etc.)
At work I do the occasional welding job on eng cowlings or burner exh cans when they crack.

As we have a full fledged Safety Dept at work, I do no welding etc before 6pm so as to negate the negative impact of absolute proper use of PPE but still keeping myself and others safe.

At the farm and at work as far as dress goes for welding I still wear my bibs, but have a fresh pair of heavily starched bibs and long sleeved kacki shirts also heavy heavy on the starch. Work boots with steel toe are a must for me when working in a shop such as this or at the farm.

I have leathers and will wear them when the need arises and do not worry about the heat as this is part of the game.

Personal choice is nothing baggy or really loose fitting and starch, heavy on the starch.
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  #27  
Old 01-12-2017, 05:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terry lingle View Post
I started wearing winter crocs and wool socks.

PPE is usually minimal for the job and escalated as the job gets more dangerous.

Ie for a simple weld such as a plug weld in a nut to a broken bolt you really can not see so I might just shield with a glove and close my eyes.
visible welding gets a good hood and at least one glove . Overhead gets the leathers and ear plugs. Air arcing gets the full out treatment AN APPRENTICE.
Theres nothing like a sizzler in the ear is there.
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  #28  
Old 01-12-2017, 03:04 PM
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Hiway knows what's up. Starch works very well. I sometimes wear my old BDU jackets because after so many times thru the cleaners their starch is permanent.

I collect fire extinguishers when I go to liquidation auctions. They go for little or nothing and I scatter them around my buildings to ensure full coverage. )I also collect pressurized water extinguishers for spraying vegetation killer.)

I collect CO2 cylinders (vapor withdrawal) for portable tire inflation and to power impact wrenches, but if you hold a vapor withdrawal cylinder upside down with no regulator you get a powerful liquid withdrawal fire extinguisher.

A smoke detector saved my house and life many years ago, so while it's not welding PPE I mention them when discussing fire. Check your batteries!
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  #29  
Old 01-12-2017, 03:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironman View Post
There are plenty of guys out there who can build a fire with a welding rod, and can't put it out.
I know that during mine rescue training we were taught how to put out a burning pan of diesel. Armed with a 20 lb Ansul, it is still quite an achievement to get that sucker subdued. Wood/paper is easier than a vaporizing fuel.
I never was that good at it.
we used to burn pans of diesel in the wrecking yard for warmth in the winter. we just put a piece of plywood on top to put it out.
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  #30  
Old 01-13-2017, 08:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironman View Post
There are plenty of guys out there who can build a fire with a welding rod, and can't put it out.
I know that during mine rescue training we were taught how to put out a burning pan of diesel. Armed with a 20 lb Ansul, it is still quite an achievement to get that sucker subdued. Wood/paper is easier than a vaporizing fuel.
I never was that good at it.
That is a pretty common exercise for fire extinguisher training, and one I have done several times.
The best course I ever had was held over the course of a full day, and training was done by a professional fire training company, versus the half hour seminars usually put on by our corporate safety staff.
The course involved the pans of burning diesel,diesel dripping/running down from an elevated container onto the ground, natural gas coming from an underground pipe through soil and gravel, and other scenarios that I can't remember at present (took it probably around 10 years ago).
The course was not just a solo exercise, but also involved two people with extinguishers on the more complex fires. We were also taught how to maintain and recharge extinguishers and proper ways to carry them on our trucks.
Compared to some of the other "training" courses I have had to undergo over a long career, this one was more than worth whatever the cost per person was, and is something I would gladly take again if I was still working at my old job.
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